Question about 2001 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide Ultra Classic

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I have a 2001 flhtcui what are the ac reading coming from stator at 2.5k rpm 3k rpm and 3600 rpm. At 2000 rpm I get about 12 volts dash guage reading but at 3000 I get 13.5 to 14 at lower rpm 2000 or so I don't get reading that msake one happy

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The AC output of the stator should be 32-40 volts at 2000 RPM (16-20 per 1000 RPM). With the battery fully charged, your regulator should supply between 13.5 and 15.0 DC volts to the battery. This should be the reading you get on your voltmeter. It will vary depending on what lights and other equipment you have turned on. Sounds like everything is working fine to me. The gauge is reading the DC voltage at the battery while the engine is running. At 2000 RPM, 12 volts is a little low but, considering the accuracy of the gauge, as long as it doesn't fall below 12 volts, it's about right. You don't ride for extended periods at engine RPMs that low. Then at 3000 RPM, 14 volts is about right. If your bike never ran anymore than 12 volts, your battery would slowly go down. If it goes any higher than 15.0 volts, it will boil the battery. Usually, about 14.3 or so with no load on the system is about right.

Good Luck
Steve

Posted on May 18, 2011

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2001 Honda VT 1100 C2 Shadow Sabre not charging


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage and must be replaced AGM types more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
VT1100 Charging Problem
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
Honda shadow vt1100 Owners Workshop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda VT1100C2 Owner Manual Page 3

Apr 11, 2014 | 2001 Honda VT 1100 C2 Shadow Sabre

1 Answer

99 fatboy stator output


Disconnect the stator plug from the regulator. Have your meter in Volts AC. Start the bike and watch the meter readings. typical output is 25 volts AC per 1000 rpm. So at 1000 rpm it should read around 25 VAC. At 2000 rpm it should read around 50 VAC. and finally 3000 rpm should produce around 75 VAC. Could be a little lower which is common.

Nov 12, 2013 | Harley Davidson Motorcycles

1 Answer

2001 ultra classic not charging. and losses electrical power when hot in city traffic.


Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12 volts or better after charging.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor. Good luck

Oct 02, 2013 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

2002 Harley ultra high voltage


Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12 volts or better after charging.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor. Good luck

Sep 23, 2013 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

Battery drain


Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your meter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe meter for drop in aprerage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v while cranking replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor.
17. For a free wiring diagram please visit the website below and good luck.Harley Davidson Wiring Diagrams and Schematics

Apr 28, 2013 | 2001 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

2001 Electraglide Ultra..battery won't charge. Where do I test the output of the Volt. Reg.?


Hi Thomas, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your meter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe meter for drop in aprerage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v while cranking replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor.
17. For a free wiring diagram please visit the website below and good luck.Harley Davidson Wiring Diagrams and Schematics

Nov 18, 2012 | 2001 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

Pucrchased 2001 ultra classic. Battery would not stay charged. Replaced battery and still would not keep charge. Replaced ststor and voltage regulator. Rode 750 miles and stator went out. What would c


Hi Ed, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your meter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe meter for drop in aprerage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at BOTH ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v while cranking replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor.
17. For a free wiring diagram please visit the website below and good luck. Harley Davidson Wiring Diagrams and Schematics

Jul 07, 2012 | 2001 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

I was drving 2001 honda cbr929rr and idle sounded funny. when i went to start it after work..the battery was dead. i tried to push start it and made it almost all the way home. charged battery and it...


Hi, Djetude before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage and must be replaced AGM types more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://www.fireblades.org/forums/honda-fireblade/83463-929-charging-problems.html
bike wont hold charge
2000 2001 Honda CBR929RR Fireblade Service Manual Moto Data Project
OEM parts for Yamaha
Honda CB Owners Manuals

May 02, 2017 | 2001 Honda CBR 929 RR Fireblade

1 Answer

2000 ultra wont charge, iread how to troubleshoot found problem to be stator is it a complicated repair and where is it located thanks


AHHHH the old charging system problems, lol.

Your stator is located on the left side of the engine (as your sitting on it), behind your primary(behind your compensating sprocket, and rotor). Yes, this is a little complicated to diagnose but I will try my best to help you out.

1. Start your bike, and put your multimeter on your battery(black to neg. and red to pos.).
2. at idle you may read 11.5-13.5 Volts, this is normal. now when you rev the engine to 3000 RPM your Voltage should jump to no more than 14.7 or very close to it. If it stays low It could be either your stator or regulator. If its way higher, you need a new regulator. But first, lets test the stator. Turn the engine off.

Locate the stator wires directly in front of your oil filter, see it going into the inner primary?? Ok follow those wires to the regulator, in fron of the frame kind of by the oil filter and front motor mount, but connected to the frame. OK, go it?? Unplug the stator from the regulator. Now your gonna be testing the stator so dont even worry about the regulator. Now that you have the wires from the staor in your hands ( your hands should be filthy by now, lol)

1. Set your multimeter to Volts AC. Youll be going to about less than 100 VAC so set it max off 100 or 200.
2. Remember that this is a 3 phase system so you should 3 pins, so youll have 3 readings, Pin 1-2, pin 1-3, and pin 2-3.

3. Touch your mutlimeter probes to pins 1 and to pin 2, with the engine on and at idle, you should be about 20-30 VAC around there.
4. As you rev the engine, you should jump about 20 VAC per 1000 RPM. This means that at 3000 RPM you should be reading about 60-70 VAC. Do this test with the other pins. Pin 1-2, pins 1-3, pins 2-3. You should have about the same readings on all of them, and, your readings should be steady, and not drop off or gain alot.
5. Remember about 20 VAC per 1000 RPM. But, dont go over 3000 Rpm.

Results:
1. If the AC voltage at the stator is steady at 3000 RPM at about 60 VAC., but, battery voltage stays at 13V at 3000 RPM with stator and regulator hooked up, You got a bad regulator.
2. If your not getting a good AC voltage from the stator, your stator is bad.
3. If the AC voltage from your stator changes drastically as you go up in RPM (meaning as you slowly go up in RPM the AC Voltage goes from 10 Volts to 60 Volts back down to 20 volts.) You have a bad rotor.

Thats pretty much the basics, lol. Also open your clutch cover and smell your primary, if its an overwhelming disgusting burnt smell, and your clutch is working. 99.9% you have a burned stator and needs replaced.

May 03, 2011 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

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