Question about kawasaki GPX 750 R Motorcycles

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I have just purchased a Kawasaki 98 GPXR motorbike and need to replace the front wheel tyre. How do i go about removing the wheel so that i can take it to the mechanics to get this done?

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Torque specs:

Front axle = 80 ft/lb
Front axle clamp bolt = 15 ft/lb
Front axle caliper mounting bolts = 25 ft/lb

Front Wheel Removal:

1. While the bike is still on the rear stand (but before putting it on the front stand), loosen the front axle clamp bolt with a 6mm hex bit. You do not need to remove it fully, just be sure it's loose.

2. Using the 14mm hex bit, loosen the front axle bolt. A breaker bar makes this step easier. Once it is loose you can go ahead and place the motorcycle on the front stand.

3. Using the 12mm socket, remove the front brake caliper mounting bolts. Once you have the brake off of the rotor, replace the bolts back in the caliper to prevent losing them. Hang the brake using cable ties or twine. BE SURE NOT TO PUSH THE BRAKE PEDAL! This will compress the brake pads and make it difficult to re-install. Repeat the process for the other side.

4. Once the brakes are tied off out of the way, finish removing the front axle bolt. It's helpful to use some wood to support the wheel while removing the axle bolt. Be sure to note the spacers on the wheel between the forks and the wheel. Remove them so they don't get lost. These will need to be greased before reinstalling.

5. Installation is the reverse of removal. Be sure to replace the calipers and torque them to 25 ft/lb. Once the front axle bolt has been torqued to 80 ft/lb, be sure to drop the front to the ground and bounce the front forks 4-5 times. This will seat the forks on the axle. Then you can tighten the front axle clamp bolt to 15 ft/lb.

Posted on Mar 26, 2011

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1 Answer

How many ft lbs of torch do you use for rear tire


bit confused. Do you want the psi of the tyre or the torque of the rear wheel axle.
Tyre should be about 21psi
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Frount end wobble on my 1992 kawasaki voyager


So many differnt things can cause this.
worn tyre front
bent wheel
bent discs
worn wheel bearings
worn or unlubricated head bearings.
leaking fork seals'lack of fork oil

the problem can also be caused from the rear of the bike, tyre, bearings, swing arm. misaligned wheels, bent frame etc.

If this has just started happening, tyres and bearings most common.
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Could you the tyre pressures front and rear for a kawasaki ninja 600 year 2000 please .thanks


hi, in there wisdome kawasaki played around with tyre sizes on the zx6r ninja,

tyre size rear 160/60/17.
tyre size front 120/60/17 1995-98 models zx600f

rear. 170/60/17
front 120/60/17 1998-2000 models zx600-g1

rear 180/55/17
front 120/65/17 2000-01 models zx600j

the only thing they didnt play around with is the tyre pressures all models front 36psi or 2.5 bar
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3 Answers

Vibrations from the front wheel


well you asked for this!!!!
check the fork bushes for any play and that they move freely no jumping about,,,,check the wheel bearings for play,,,heck the head race bearings for play and that they are free to turn with out being *****,
check the swinging arm bushes,,,now if all this is good,,,have your wheel balanced

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2 Answers

Have a 2002 chev malibu v6 front wheel drive, have a howling noise and a vibration when approaching speeds of 100 kph (60 mph), I have replaced both front bearings, rebalanced tires, rotated as well, still...


If it is a tire related howl you are getting as well as the vibration through the steering wheel once you hit about 60 mph there is a number of things you need to do.

1. If you have not had a wheel alignment carried out on the vehicle in the last 6 months then have it done at a reputable suspension specialist (not a tyre dealer). Check your front tires for wear pattern in any event as uneven wear on the tyre is a sure sign of poor alignment. Bad alignment can also contribute to vibration problems. I will guarantee you that when you get the alignment checked it will be out. I am not sure if the rear alignment is adjustable on your model but if it is you will in fact need a 4 wheel alignment. (REFER point 7 also)

2. When the alignment and other necessary front end work is done check to see if the problems persists..

3. I assume your vehicle has the steel rims fitted with the plastic wheel cover. Remove the covers on the front wheels and check for the vibration. If it disappears then the out of balance condition is caused by the covers. (This would not explain the tyre howl though).

4. Remove both front wheels (clean them) and check for damage to the rims on both sides including outside scuffing. (Check tyres also.)
If the steel rim is bent or warped it will not run true and you will get vibration and the tyres will tend to be noisy on the road. It is not always easy to identify a warped steel rim from a visual check. Spinning the wheel on a wheel balance machine should normally show this up though.
If you have alloy wheels fitted these tend to crack and break rather than bend or warp.

5. Out of balance wheels.

It is possible for a wheel to be so badly manufactured that no amount of balancing on a tyre balance machine will fix it. This is a particular problem with cheap alloy wheels but even good quality wheel manufacturers will occasionally let a bad alloy wheel slip past their quality control .

6. Tyres.
If you buy budget tyres you are generally buying poor performance and potentially poorly constructed tyres. Tyres can be produced with inbuilt heavy spots that will make them impossible to properly balance. You will forever have a balance problem (and hence vibration) with such tyres. A good manufacturer will not allow such tyres to slip through quality control. Others are much less fussy. It is always a bad decision to purchase tyres in the lower price ranges.
In your case it is quite possible that if your wheels are ok the tyres are badly constructed and it is not possible to balance them properly. (This would not explain the tyre howl though).

7. Given the age of your vehicle you should have the front suspension and steering components inspected. It is possible that wear in critical components could be the source of the problem. When you take the car to the suspension specialist for the wheel alignment you need to have the front end fully checked over first and any problem areas attended to.

Without test driving and pysically inspecting the vehicle it is not possible to identify the source or sources of the problems. My best estimate is that there are significant wear problems in front end components and that your front end aligment is also out.
However , I hope this helps.

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1 Answer

Noise from front wheel of motorbike


Tread pattern can affect road noise considerably. Did you select a type designed for dirt? It would be a sort of rough buzz. Check for correct air pressure. An incorrect tire mounting usually causes a 'lumpy' ride and could be very dangerous at speed. Raise the front end till the wheel is clear and spin the tire. An improper mounting will show as an uneven tire pattern as the wheel turns.

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1 Answer

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Simply undo the axle nut and slide out the axle bolt. You might need to take out the split pin if your bike has one.

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