Question about Suzuki GSF 250 Bandit Motorcycles

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Carburetor Diagram. I want to know where the O' rings are most importantly so I dont wreck them when cleaning the carburetors.

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6ya6ya
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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 2336 Answers

SOURCE: Carburator cleaning

The First thing you have to NOT DO, is try to start it if it has been sitting for any long duration of time, 6 months or more, second, you have to remove the gas tank, drain the contents, into a can you can see in, look for a dark brown colored corpusal, in the gas, if there is some, that is an indication, that your carbs need to come apart, unless you are a seasoned mechanic, you will have to remove the carb, take the bowl off, of course you will look for the brown couloured substance again, clean the bowl,remove the pin, holding the float in placebeing carfule to secure the needle valve in its proper place after cleaning it thouroughly, remove the jet, using a tiny bit, you reem the jet hole center, taking care not to bore it out, the you run the bit in the jet hole, cleaning any debri that may be there, use carb cleaner and keep spraying it in all in puts and out puts the carb may have, then if you put your mouth to the feul input to the carb, blow in it to be sure it is clear, if not youl have to use carb cleaner and air to clean it out, air and carb cleaner is the key to cleaning it properly, some carbs need to be taken apart and soaked in a carb cleaner, before reassembly, just keep blowing air in all the inputs and out puts, to be sure they are cleared, reassemble and GO

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

  • 2712 Answers

SOURCE: Cleaning the carburetor

Once it has been determined that the carbs are the problem it's time to get to it. Some racks of carbs are easier to remove than others. If you're working on a newer model bike the rubber boots from the airbox to the carbs and the manifold boots from the carbs to the motor should be relatively soft and pliable. On older bikes however this is rarely the case. First remove the fuel tank, seat, and side covers. Depending on your model of bike other parts may need to be removed too. For many single cylinder bikes the carb can often be removed without removing any body work at all. The bike below is a 1983 Yamaha XJ750 Seca with 4 inline Hitachi carburetors You'll want to loosen the circle clamps on all of the rubber boots. Sometimes I'll even take them all right off (carefully, without bending them too badly) so that they aren't in the way. Inspect the airbox. On many bikes it is bolted in place to tabs on the frame. Remove those bolts and try to create as much space as possible for the airbox to pull backwards. Next, put the bike on it's centerstand and straddle it facing forward. Put your right hand on the right-most carburetor and your left hand on the left-most carburetor and get ready to sweat. Sometimes you'll be able to pull the carbs straight backwards nice and easy, but that is pretty rare. I usually end up rotating them up then rotating them down as best I can while pulling backwards furiously. This can really take some work and time, especially if you've never done it before. In real extreme cases where you simple can't get the carbs to pull backwards out of the manifold boots I have a couple tips. These tips should only be used in extremely difficult cases when you have been struggling for an hour and simple can't get the carbs to pull backwards out of the manifold boots. Tip 1: Ratchet Straps - This is sort of a last resort, but it has worked without fail for me when I'm pooling sweat on the garage floor and the carbs aren't budging. Wrap a ratchet strap around one of the outer carbs and put the hooks somewhere on the rear of the frame. Then slowly ratchet the carbs right out of the boots. Be careful not to pull them too cockeye'd or you could damage the boots. Attach a second ratchet strap to the other side if necessary. (Note: you can do this in the opposite direction to force carbs back into the boots once they are clean.) Tip 2: Full Pull! - You should do this before you do the ratchet strap method above. Sit down on your butt along one side of the bike. Wedge one of your feet up between the forks and the front fender, then put both hands on the same outermost carb and PULL PULL PULL! This might not work so well if you're short! Ha. Ok, So The Carbs are pulled back Chances are the airbox boots are all crammed up now. Do your best to rotate the carbs up and out from the boots and pull them out one side of the bike. Sometimes it's easier to pull the carbs out one side than the other, so have a look to see if there are frame elements, motor elements, or hoses that may block the carbs from coming out on one side. Also keep note of the throttle cable(s) and choke cable (if there is one). Now may be a good time to loosen the nuts that hold them in place and disconnect them. Struggle just a couple more minutes wriggling the carbs out the side. Ok, You have the carbs off the bike Make sure you brush off any loose dirt or grime, then flip the carbs over and remove the screws from the corners of the carburetor. Some carbs won't have bolts in the corner and instead have a wire latch over top which can just be forced over. Remove the bowls. If the carbs are real gummed up the insides might look like this: It's obvious that these carbs are all clogged up. Some carbs might not look so bad, some might be a lot worse. It's always a mystery what will be inside the bowls. Now it's time to remove the floats. It's generally a good idea to drench everything in carb cleaner (available at any autoparts store). Sometimes the pins will practically fall right out, sometimes they'll be so stubborn you won't think they'll ever come free. But they will! Carefully push on the pin from either side. Sometimes a nail and a gentle tap from a hammer is helpful. **BE CAREFUL**, using force to remove a stuck float pin can break off the pin tower. If they are really stuck and you can't seem to work them free here are a couple tips. Tip 1: Heat - Adding a little flame to the float pin towers can help. **Don't Burn Down Your Garage!!** Tip 2: Pliers - Using pliers to gently clamp the end of the pin and push it through has worked well for me in the past. **Don't break the towers!!** Once the float pin is out you can remove the floats, the float needle, and unscrew the float jet screen. Set everything aside. Next remove the main jet, pilot jet, and idle jet (if there is one). They should come out easily with a flathead screw driver. Set them aside. Next flip the carburetors back over and remove the caps. Underneath the caps is a rubber diaphram with a spring. Sometimes the caps have a tendency to shoot off the top, so be very methodical when removing the screws. Other times the cap tends to stick down until you start to pry at it, then it shoots off, again, just be cautious and don't loose any parts. Next you'll want to gently pull the slides up out of the carburetor body. You can gently pull on the rubber diaphrams, but be very careful not to tear them. If they don't come up easily stick your finger into the carb intake and push the slide up with your finger. You can also gently pry it with a screw driver (gently). If it doesn't want to budge don't force it. Instead finish reading this article and pay attention to the boiling tips further down. Now your carbs should be pretty well emptied out. If the throttle on the bike moved fluidly and smooth there is little reason to do much to the carb bodies themselves. However, if the trottle was real sticky or frozen there are a few things you can do to free it up. Sometimes just drenching all the throttle components on the carbs and letting it soak is enough, other times it is not. I generally try to break racks of carbs apart. It isn't often necessary and can be confusing to put everything back together in the right places. Also, the little rubber connector hoses and o-rings have a tendency to crack or leak if you mess with them. If you can't work the throttle back and forth until its smooth have a look at the boiling tips further down. Keep it Neat Organization pays off. Clean the Main, Idle and Pilot Jets Hold each jet up to the light and see if you can look through it. The idle and/or pilot jets have extremely small holes so make sure you are looking through them straight. If you can see through the jet it isn't clogged. There could be a little gunk built up around the edges so spray them down with carb cleaner and let them sit a bit. If you can't see through the jet it is clogged and needs to be cleaned. Always try the easiest things first. Here's an ordered list of a few things you can do to clean the jet. Blow through it. - Rarely works, but hey, who knows. Compressed air. - Force 100 pounds into it. Works occassionally. Make sure to hold the jet tightly so it doesn't go flying across the garage. You might put the jet back into the carb body to hold it in place for this. Soak it in cleaner. - When I first started cleaning carbs I thought carb cleaner would be the magic answer. It isn't. In fact, I hardly ever use carb cleaner any more, because it simply doesn't do a very good job of anything but removing varnish from the bowl and slide. But try this. Poking it through. - Collect a few different diameters of needle like objects. A wire from a steel bristle brush works well, a bristle from a broom works well, a baby pin, small sewing needle, etc. Very gently try to poke it through the jet. If you are using a metal needle use caution, brass jets can scratch and deform easily. Boiling! - This works better than anything. Toss the jets into a pot of boiling water and let them bounce around for a couple minutes. When you pull them out blow some compressed air through them and you'll most likely be good to go. Some idle jets can be real tricky and never seem like they'll be cleaned out . . . Just keep working at it, I've never met a jet that couldn't be cleaned. Cleaning the Choke and Air Mixture Screw Air mixture screws have a tendency to strip or break. If the carbs were real gummed up you might find that the air screws are stuck. Don't force them, if they don't want to come out, just leave them for now. It is fairly rare that these screws will need to be cleaned because they are above the float level. If you can get them out just wipe them down with carb cleaner and spray some through the jet. Cleaning the Slide and Needle These are easy to clean. Squirt them with a bit of carb cleaner, wd-40, or anything similar, then wipe them down with a rag. Once the varnish is gone they're good to go. Sometimes they get heavy varnish on them which I will scratch off carefully with a piece of plastic. Scratching the slide and needle is a BAD thing, use caution. Cleaning the Carb Bodies Use the same squirt and wipe method noted above. Most of the time the other pressed jets and passages in the carburetors won't be clogged. But if the bike has been sitting a real long time with squirrels in the airbox it is certainly possible. Us a compressor to blow some air into every passage you can see. Listen for the air coming out the other side. If no air compressor is available use a can of WD-40 with a straw attachment. If some of the pressed jets are clogged it can be difficult to open them up. There are a few things you can do. Carb Dip - Most autoparts stores sell carb dip. It comes in a can similar to a paint can and is a VERY harsh cleaning agent. Soak the entire carbs in this dip. This dip can eat at rubber and plastics if they are submerged for too long, so try and remove everything you can from the carb bodies before soaking them. Once you pull them out swish the carbs around in a bucket of water to clean off the excess dip, then hose them down with WD-40 to get rid of the water. Boiling in Water - Not many people do this but it is by far the best way of cleaning carburetors. Dropping the carbs into a pot of boiling water will instantly free up stuck slides, throttle plates, and other frozen parts. It will also loosen the dirt and grime clogging up pressed jets and other passages. Just make sure to dry the carbs thoroughly with compressed air or the sun afterwards. Boiling in Lemon Juice - There is NOTHING BETTER at cleaning carbs than a giant pot of boiling lemon juice. The acidity from the lemons eats through everything; gas varnish, oil build up, dirt, grime, etc. Sometimes I won't even bother doing anything but this - I'll just remove the bowls, remove the caps, then drop everything into the pot and let it sit for 20 minutes (rotate them a few times). The one caveat to doing this is that you'll want to wash the lemon juice off the carbs as soon as you pull them out. So have a bucket of water ready, or a can of WD-40 to hose them down. Also note that the acidity has a tendency to put a dull finish on the aluminum bodies of the carbs. This isn't a problem in most cases, but if you must have everything shiny be prepared to do a little scrubbing and polishing afterwards. It may sound weird, but trust me, I just saved you LOTS of time. (Most dollar stores sell 1/2 gallon jugs of lemon juice, so buying a few gallons will only cost you $6. Plus you can put it back into the bottles afterwards and save it for next time.) Cleaning the Bowls This is pretty straight forward. Use any of the methods above to tranform your varnished bowls. Most carb bowls are simple, just clean them up and they are good to go. But I picked this Hitachi's for photos because they have a jet built into the bowl. You can see the 'fifth' hole along the edge of the bowl, that is actually a thin passage that extends to the bottom of the bowl. This is for the idle jet and is extremely important. If these passages are clogged, the bike won't stay running, period. Use the same poke, soak, and boiling methods outlined elsewhere in this article. Not all bowls have these passages, only some, if your's don't - good for you! Once Everything is Clean Now that everything is clean it's time to put it all back together. Take your time and make sure you put everything back where it came from. WD-40 is your friend. When screwing in the jets don't over do it, they only need to be seated and snug, do NOT use any force putting the carbs back together. If the bowl gaskets got goobered up you can put a little RVT on them. So long as the float needles are still in good condition leaky gaskets shouldn't be an issue. However, prudent carb tinkerers may want to order replacements if necessary. Once the carbs are back together stuff them back into the bike! Extra Notes Rebuild Kits - This guide did not mention rebuild kits until now. Rebuild kits (consisting of new gaskets, jets, needles, etc) can be purchased for nearly any bike, both old and new. 95% of the time these are NOT needed. I have rebuilt enough carbs to block off main street, and only once have I used new parts. ONCE! Carburetor Adjustment - Carburetor adjustment, setup, jetting, and synchronizing is a whole encyclopedia waiting to happen. Those topics are not covered in this article, but I will address them in future articles. Carburetor Polishing - External carb asthetics will be important to some, and not to others. Cleaning is all I am covering here, this will be addressed in the future. Work Space - Make sure you have lots of space to keep organized. I also like to work on a wooden surface because it absorbs the spilled gas and cleaners rather than pooling. That's it! You're Done! I'll continue to write a couple more related articles about diagnosing carburetion issues as well as the proper way to adjust, jet, and tune your carbs.

Posted on Nov 20, 2008

  • 200 Answers

SOURCE: schematic diagram of a 1981 yamaha 750 virago carburetor

Should get a good view of it by downloding free manual at
carlsalter.com...good Luck to you friend...Tim

Posted on May 13, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Carb needs cleaning

Hey this link might help, lots of pictures in case its your first time. http://www.kawiforums.com/zzr600-zx-6r-old-school/104220-cleaning-carbs-your-old-school-6r-complete-writeup-w-pics.html

Posted on Jul 29, 2009

  • 3567 Answers

SOURCE: how do I clean the carburetor?

ALWAYS have a fire extinguisher on hand when working on carburetors.
Remove the water trap bowl at the bottom of the petcock, (gas valve). Is there any water or trash in the bowl? Drain a cup of gas from the tank. Is there any water or trash in the cup? Dump it, clean it and re-mount it, ( not all bikes have a water trap bowl ).

Drain the carburetor. There should be a screw on the lower side or bottom of the carb float bowl. Remove the screw then replace it after the fuel drains. Install a new stock NGK spark plug and clean the air filter. If the bike still doesn't start and run properly then shut off the gas and remove the carburetor from the engine.

Remove the float bowl and clean the entire carb with a spray carb cleaner from the auto parts store. Wear protective goggles to avoid getting spray in your eyes. Spray into all the little airways and fittings in the carb. Remove the idle screw and the air screw on the outside throat of the
carb and spray into the screw holes as well.
< < READ CLOSELY > >
Be sure to put these two screws back in the same hole they came out of. IMPORTANT > do not tighten these two adjusters down. Only screw these in until they LIGHTLY seat. Now turn each adjuster one and one half turns outward. Re-
install the carb. Let the float bowl fill then start the engine.

Please rate this solution. Thanks!

Posted on Aug 19, 2009

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Hi getles...

Sounds like you have dirt/debris in your carburetor jets,fuel passages or a diaphgram that is becoming non-flexible.
NOTE: Before you dissemble the carburetor:
Make sure you mark each piece with a awl, or some kind of instrument that will make an alignment scratch before you dissemble the carburetor into separate pieces.
That way you will know which way it goes back together when you reassemble it.
Be sure to check your fuel tank for water and dirt/debris, if there is water/debris then you need to clean your tank.
Also check you fuel line condition after a while they will degrade and need replacment.
Make sure you are getting spark at the spark plug, to do this:
Remove your spark plug and check to be sure you are getting fire at the spark plug.
You do this by grounding the plug on the head of the engine and pulling the crank rope, if you are getting spark then:
Check/Clean/Replace your fuel filter if you have one.
Also make sure you are using fresh fuelIf the mower/weedeater is over a couple of years old, then I recommend that you buy and install a new carburetor repair kit,because the diaphragm will get hard and that will cause it to be hard to crank.
Sounds like you will need to clean the carburetor or replace your carburetor internal rubber parts like the diaphgram and O rings.
I recommend that you use a laquer thinner type cleaner to clean and dissolve the laquer build-up in the float and needle jet passages.
Be sure to remove all plastic and rubber parts before using the laquer thinner because it can dissolve the plastic parts and render them unuseable.
Be sure to use compressed air to blow out all the fuel and air passages.
Be careful when blowing out the passages, because there are sometimes small rubber type seats in the bottom of some of the passages.
Sometimes you can get by with priming the carburetor or using starting fluid and letting it run a few times like that and it will flush the gunk out of the jets,but most of the time you will need to rebuild the carburetor.
Keep in mind that the float (if you have one) for the carburetor must be level when you go to reassemble the carburetor or follow the instructions you get with the carburetor kit.
When you clean your carburetor and remove the jet screws, you will first need to lightly seat the jet screws.
But before you lightly seat the jet screws count the number of turns it takes to seat the jet screws from their original position.
Be sure to mark the turns down on a piece of paper.
That way when you put the jets back in, you know to lightly seat them first and then turn them back out to their original position before you started.
Once you have your carburetor rebuilt that should solve your problem.
This is a FREE answer,Please take time to rate me

Jun 21, 2011 | Garden

1 Answer

Homelite mighty lite 26ss model ut21546 won't start. I need a carburetor diagram.


Hi tbronco44...
I have no diagram but try this solution to your problem.
Be sure to mark your parts as you take the carburetor apart...

Check your fuel filter if you have one, normally they are located in the fuel tank.
Also make sure you are using fresh fuel...and oil mix if your using a two cycle mower or weedeater with the oil to the right mixture and not too much oil as it can cause hard starting.
If the mower/weedeater is over a year old, then I recommend that you buy and install a new carburetor repair kit,because the diaphragm will get hard and that will cause it to be hard to crank.
Sounds like you will need to clean the carburetor or replace your carburetor internal rubber parts like the diaphgram and O rings.
Be sure to use compressed air to blow out all the fuel and air passages.
Be careful when blowing out the passages, because there are sometimes small rubber type seats in the bottom of some of the passages.
Sometimes you can get by with priming the carburetor or using starting fluid and letting it run a few times like that and it will flush the gunk out of the jets,but most of the time you will need to rebuild the carburetor.
Keep in mind that the float for the carburetor must be level when you go to reassemble the carburetor or follow the instrucitons you get with the carburetor kit.
When you clean your carburetor and remove the jet screws, you will first need to lightly seat the jet screws.
But before you lightly seat the jet screws count the number of turns it takes to seat the jet screws from their original position.
Be sure to mark the turns down on a piece of paper.
That way when you put the jets back in, you know to lightly seat them first and then turn them back out to their orginal position before you started.
This is a FREE answer,Please rate me

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Check your fuel filter in the fuel tank, if you have one.
It may need replacement or cleaning.
Also check your fuel tank for debris/trash and clean it out if necessary.
If the mower/weedeater is over a year old, then I recommend that you buy
and install a new carburetor repair kit,because the diaphragm will get hard
and that will cause it to be hard to crank.
Sounds like you will need to clean the carburetor or replace your carburetor
internal rubber parts like the diaphgram and O rings.
Be sure to use compressed air to blow out all the fuel and air passages.
Be careful when blowing out the passages, because there are sometimes small
rubber type seats in the bottom of some of the passages.
Sometimes you can get by with priming the carburetor or using starting fluid
and letting it run a few times like that and it will flush the gunk out of
the jets,but most of the time you will need to rebuild the carburetor.
Keep in mind that the float for the carburetor must be level when you go to
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When you clean your carburetor and remove the jet screws, you will first need
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But before you lightly seat the jet screws count the number of turns it takes
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Be sure to mark the turns down on a piece of paper.
That way when you put the jets back in, you know to lightly seat them first
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This is a FREE answer,Please rate me

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I have a 1yo Yard Machine snowblower that idle surges.. I used it maybe 6 times last winter, cleaned it and parked it. Just took it out once again and now its surging.. I have changed the plug, topped off...


Your probem is the carb...it has some trash/debris in one of the fuel passages.
I highly recommend that you reclean and reset your float level.

Check your fuel filter, if you have one.
It may need replacement or cleaning.
Also check your fuel tank for debris/trash and clean it out if necessary.
If the mower/weedeater is over a year old, then I recommend that you buy
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When you clean your carburetor and remove the jet screws, you will first need
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But before you lightly seat the jet screws count the number of turns it takes
to seat the jet screws from their original position.
Be sure to mark the turns down on a piece of paper.
That way when you put the jets back in, you know to lightly seat them first
and then turn them back out to their orginal position before you started.
This is a FREE answer,Please rate me

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Hello cmsbss:

>>From your Description it Sounds like the Carburetor requires Soaking and Cleaning.
>>The Following is a Basic File I Made for Cleaning Carburetors. Any Input is Appreciated. Even though the Carburetor Looks Clean, the Internal Passages May be Restricted with Varnish that Gas Causes to Build Up over Time.
>>Spray Cleaners Remove this Varnish in Layers, so Soaking is the Only Sure Way to Remove ALL this Varnish.
>>I Suggest you Make Sure the Gas is Free Flowing to the Carburetor Inlet Port (if the Model does Not have a Fuel Pump). If the Gas is Free Flowing to the Inlet Port, then
>>**Remove, Disassemble and Soak the Carburetor Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk).
>>The Primer Bulb is Held in Place with a Locking Collar at the Base of the Primer Bulb. Use a Small Flat Screw Driver and Carefully Pry the Lock Ring Up in Small Amounts All Around the Lock Ring until the Lock Ring and Primer Bulb can be Removed from the Carburetor Body. Usually a New Primer Bulb is Required when you have to Soak the Carburetor. The Rubber is Usually Rotted to Much for the Primer to be Reused.
>>Your Primer Bulb May Differ Slightly, but Removal is Usually Almost the Same Except for the Primer Bulbs that are Bolted to the Carburetor. These are Simply Unbolted and Changed with the new Primer Bulb.
>>I have Found that Most People can Use a Breakdown/IPL and Disassemble the Carburetor Enough for Proper Cleaning.
>>You Only have to Remove the Bowl (if Applicable), Float Pin (if Applicable), Float (if Applicable), Needle Valve and Needle Valve Seat if Applicable. This is a Flat O-Ring Located in the Inlet Port the Float Needle Rests in. Use a Strong Wire with a Slight Bend to Remove the Old Seat. Sometimes a Small Pocket Screw Driver can be Use Also.
>>The New Seat will have a Slightly Beveled Side and a Flat Side. The Flat Side goes Towards the Carburetor Body when Inserted into the Inlet Port. Spray the Seat with Spray Lubricant to make Installation Easier. The End of a Drill Bit that is Slightly Small than the Seat can be Use as an Insertion Tool.
>>Wear Gloves or Use a Rag when Handling the Sharpened End of the Drill Bit. Remove Any Adjustment Screws that Go Into the Carburetor Body. The Welch Plugs Do Not have to be Removed.
>>If you are Able to Remove and Disassemble the Carburetor and Keep the Gaskets Intact, then Usually these Gaskets can be Reused. Even the O-Ring Around the Bowl can be Reused if it is Not Broken. The Only Parts you May Need to Replace is the Float Needle Valve (and Seat if Applicable).
>>The Float Needle Usually is Not Replaced Unless it is Not Operating Properly (the gas flow not shutting off and the carburetor is Flooding). Do Not Remove the Main Nozzle. This is a Pressed Fit and Removal is Not Required for Cleaning. Soaking and Blowing the Carburetor Out After Soaking will Clean the Nozzle.
>>Once Disassembled, then Soak the Carburetor Body and Parts in a 1 Gallon Can of Gunk Carburetor Cleaner Overnight. The Can has a Parts Tray Inside it for the Small Parts.
>>Once the Carburetor and Parts are in the Cleaner, you can Replace the Lid for Safety and to Prevent Accidental Spillage. Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air.
>>***(Do Not Use High Pressure Air for the Zama Carburetors, they have Check Valves for the Primer and these are Usually Blown Out of the Carburetor if Not Careful. Allow the Zama Carburetor to Set on a Drip Pan and Dry)***.
>>****All the Carburetor Adjustments are the Same for Lawn Mower and Trimmers. There are Several Location for the Air Mixture Screws. The Idle Air Mixture Screws are Usually Located at the Top of the Carburetor Bowl and the Top of the Carburetor Body.****
>>If the Main Air and Idle Air Mixture Screws are Side by Side on the Side of the Carburetor, then the Idle Air is Nearest the Engine. The Main Jet Air Mixture Screw is Located in the Bottom of the Carburetor Bowl or Beside the Idle Air Screw on the Side of the Carburetor Body.
>>Some of the Older Model Carburetors have the Main Jet Mixture Screw Straight in from the Top of the Carburetor Body (this is Rare anymore). If you have Cleaned the Carburetor (Disassembled and Soaked Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk). Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air and Install a New Kit if Required. Now Setting the Air Mixture Screws:
>>****Turn the Idle Air and Main Air Mixture Screws In Until SNUG **Do Not Jam** Then Reverse Both Screws 1 1/2 Turns. Holding the Throttle Full Open, Start the Engine. Turn the Main Air Mixture Screw Clockwise Until Proper Revs are Obtained. Occasionally you May have to Turn this Counter Clockwise to Achieve the Proper Revs. Now Allow the Engine to Idle. Set the Engine Idle Screw (Not Idle Air) so the Engine will Stay Running if Required. Now Set the Idle Air Mixture Screw so there is No Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle. Reset the Engine Idle if Required.****
>>If This Carburetor has a Single Air Adjustment (Except Tank Mounted 9200 and 100900 Engine Model Carburetors), Use the Section Above that Pertains to Full Throttle RPM Air Mixture Screw and then Adjust the Screw if Required to Eliminate Any Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle.
>>For the 9200 Model Tank Mounted Carburetor Adjust the Air Mixture Screw Full In, then Reverse 1 1/2 Turns. Set the Throttle Lever to Full Throttle and Start the Engine.
>>Now Carefully Use 1 Finger and Open the Throttle Plate and Over Rev the Engine Slightly. If the Engine Over Revs and Does Not Struggle to Over Rev, then the Carburetor is Set. If the Engine Struggles to Over Rev, then Turn the Adjustment Screw In 1/4 Turn and Repeat the Over Rev Test.
>>If you Adjust to 1/2 Turns In and the Engine Still Struggles to Over Rev, then Return the Adjustment Screw to 1 1/2 Turns Out from Snug and Turn the Screw Out 1/4 Turn. Do the Over Rev Test. Continue this Process Until you have the Engine Over Revving without Struggle.
>>By Adjusting the Carburetor on this Style Carburetor Until the Engine Over Revs without Struggle, you have Adjusted the Air Mixture to the Best Possible Setting.
>>This file was Intended to Give you the Basic Carburetor Cleaning Instructions and May Not Reflect Your Carburetor Components.
>>If you have Questions, Please Ask. The links above Provide Good Directions on Cleaning the Carburetor. Make sure you use an Compressed Air to Blow through all the Carburetor Passages to make sure they are Clear.
>>1- http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmclctc.htm
>>2- http://www.cpdonline.com/692509.pdf .
>>If you Hit a Snag or this Does Not Correct the Problem, I am Here if You Require More Assistance. Hope this Helps. Let me Know What Happens, Please. May the All Mighty Bless You and Yours. Be Safe and Happy.
>>Thanks.

Respectfully

John

Apr 21, 2009 | Troy-Bilt Pony Garden Tiller

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