Question about 1979 Harley Davidson XLH 1000 Sportster

2 Answers

Polorized generator as per manual. went from no output to .2-.4 amps. do I need to rebuild the generator?

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2 Answers

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  • Master
  • 8,909 Answers

Hi, I own a 1976 XLCH1000 and had a similar problem some years ago.
The dynamo must be energized correctly as if not it wouldn't work.
Disconnect the two wire on the dynamo.
Connect a volt meter from the armature connection to the bike frame, negative.
Start the bike up and on a fast tickover there should be 2 to 5 volts present. Momentarily connect, while still monitoring the voltage, a wire link from the field connection to the bikes frame (earth or negative of the battery). The voltage should shoot up to about 25 to 30 volts. If it does you have a good dynamo. If the dynamo is flashed the wrong way around then a negative voltage instead of a possitive voltage will be produced and damage the regulator if it is the electronic type, like on mine.
If the voltage is low, change the brushes and clean the commutator with some wet and dry paper scraping out between the segments to clear the dead carbon deposits. Don't forget the end bearings are "Oilite Bearings" Don't use grease a drop of 20-50 is fine.
Anywhere else in the world, we put voltage on to the field terminal to produce current at the armature, trust the Americans to be different!
Ride safe and loud pipes save lives!
Hope this solves your problem.

Posted on Nov 09, 2010

  • wd4ity
    wd4ity Nov 09, 2010

    What do you mean "trust the Americans to be different!"? LOL After all, we do drive on the "right" side of the road. BG> Yes we did it differently but considering the problems with those "other" bikes and their "Lucas, Prince of Darkness" electrics. I'll take the backwards H-D stuff anyday. I've got a friend that restores the British bikes. He likes Triumphs the best and they are beautiful machines. He also does Norton's. Not too big on the BSA's. Man, I miss those days and those bikes. Back then, motorcycles were motorcycles. Not these chrome plated idols people have turned them into today. When I tell riders that I used to ride a Sportster in the woods, they gasp like it was some kind of unforgivable sin. But, the Bonnevilles and the Commando's were right there with me. Even had an old Zundapp that rode with us.

    Best Regards,
    Steve

  • specialistel Nov 09, 2010

    I don't mean to be against American Motorcycles, after all my 1959 Triumph Thunderbird with the 6TA 650cc engine is still lovelly but I would rather ride the Harley!
    I got into trouble a good few years ago at our local Harley Dealer. I asked for some Champion R4 Spark Plugs and the sales guy replied, "We only sell Harley Davidson Spark Plugs", I replied, " Well I am learning about these Left Hand Drive Motorbikes.
    I was escorted to the door, via a free cup of coffee as I ordered m y first Buell. A Cyclone. 1200cc of brute force, lovelly!. I, a few years later also purchased a Buell Firebolt with stage 2 tuning. What a monster, it will pee al over those Japanese bikes.
    Any problems please drop me a line at harleyjon@live.co.uk
    Best Regards, Jon

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  • Master
  • 4,565 Answers

Take the band off and check the brushes and the commutator. How much voltage are you getting out of it. If your battery is fully charged, you won't get much current flow (amperage) out of it unless you load the generator with a "carbon pile" load tester. You can have voltage with no current flow. This is the principle that the "GEN" light works on. If you noticed, this light has no ground. You have a wire from the battery and a wire from the generator going to the light. As long as both voltages are equal, you have no current flow and the light is out. If one or the other voltages goes high, then you have current flow and the light glows.

Good Luck
Steve

Posted on Nov 09, 2010

  • wd4ity
    wd4ity Nov 09, 2010

    Oh, no problems Jon. Just I don't get many "old school bikers" here. My first Harley was a brand new 1966 XLH. I wanted the "H" model because it was battery fired and had a larger tank. When you got to talking about everything being backwards on a Harley, I knew I had an old British fan. No insult taken and glad to meet you. Steve

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1993 Honda shadow vt 1100 drove it to work today park it for about 2 hours went out to crank it the bike started for a second then died hit starter button again and lost all electrics no electrical power...


Hi, Bobby the following is a comprehensive charging system test that is guaranteed to the find issue with your system.
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
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2005 vl 1500 charging system system not charging checked generator 3 wires giving pluss 80v at 5000rpm instaled new rectifier voltage across battery under 13 volts could faulty battery be problem


Hi, Anonymous the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
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The generator performs three functions in the EFX. First, by controlling the amount of electrical
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Warning
Because this is a self powered unit, it will either be necessary to either equip the unit with the
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using the optional external power supply is strongly recommended.
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2. The following voltage reading must be taken while the unit is in motion. Extreme care must
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Hi, Anonymous the following is a comprehensive charging system test that is guaranteed to the find issue with your system.
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
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Procedure 6.4 - Troubleshooting the Generator
The generator performs three functions in the EFX. First, by controlling the amount of electrical
load applied to the generator, the user's pedalling resistance is controlled. Second, the generator
is used to charge the EFX's internal battery. Lastly, one of the generators six phase output
windings is monitored to determine when the unit is in use and when it is idle. This system also
determines the stride rate by determining the operating speed (output frequency) of the
monitored generator winding.
Warning
Because this is a self powered unit, it will either be necessary to either equip the unit with the
optional external power supply or have an assistant pedal on the unit while voltage
measurements are being taken. Because of the danger of working on the unit while it is in motion
using the optional external power supply is strongly recommended.
1. Perform the generator resistance test per Procedure 5.1. If any of the resistance
measurements are significantly high or significantly low, replace the generator.
2. The following voltage reading must be taken while the unit is in motion. Extreme care must
be taken to keep meter leads, hands, etc. clear of all moving parts. Using an AC voltmeter,
measure the voltage between 1 & 3, 2 & 3, 5 & 7 and 6 & 7 on J1 of the lower PCA. All AC
voltage readings will vary depending on the unit's stride rate at the time the measurement is
taken. At a stride rate of 100 strides per minute, all three voltage readings will be
approximately 100 VAC -110 VAC.
3. If any of the six readings in step 2 are significantly low, replace the generator.


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I am installinga 4548 inverter. At 4500 watts, it puts out approximately 20 amp per phase. My generater that will feed the charging current for the batteries will put outapproximately 28 amps. Is the...


Let just wait a minute. You have an inverter that is rated at 4500 watts. This spooky. The inverter has a three phase input/three phase output? What is the inverter going to be used for?

Next question. What type of batteries are you using and what is the voltage/current in series or parallel? What will be the total voltage you will producing with the batteries? What is the total current of the batteries.

Another question? What is the voltage of the 28 amps? If it going to dump 28 amps across some batteries that rated at 12 volts and 1400 amp/hrs. For 12 volt batteries with a total of 1400 amps. What you will need approx 14 to 14 1/2 DC and with 28 amps across the batteries for charging these batteries. The batteries will be gone in about 1 hour. Boil all the water out of them. When a battery starts to boil it release water with hydrogen gas (the gas is very explosive and dangerous).

You also don't have a regulation circuit to limit the amount of current depending on the needs of the batteries. Also, you don't have a trickle charger to keep the batteries fully charge when the batteries are idle.

You will also need DC regulated charger that will keep the voltage 2-4 volts above you battery voltage. Without this voltage above the batteries voltage it will not charge those batters. Batteries need to forced to except a charge that why voltage above the source voltage. If you can check the voltage on your car/truck with a 12 volt system. While engine is running the voltage across the battery will be 13.8 to 14.1 volts. Now, the current limiter is the alternator it has a regulator built into it for stabiizing voltage and current went the batteries require more current but it limited by alternator regulator
Now, to get more current out of the alternator the regulator will supply dc voltage to the stator of the alternator generator more current. More dc voltage is supplied by the regulator but the dc voltages is limit to about 24 volts. Another limiting factor is the alternator copper windings diameter---larger diameter more current, small diameter less current. Utilities systems use big mega watts generators. The maxi um dc voltage for these three phase generator would like 500 to 800dc volts for peak to peak output. There is a simpler way of doing this.

You need to rethink everything here. Also, I can help you if you supply the needed information.
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Hi, Sasha684 before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
http://www.sloneservices.com/SilverBack/Other-Stuff/VS-1100-chagre-syst.pdf
Yamaha Super Tenere XTZ750 Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-xt-owners-manuals

Feb 21, 2010 | 1990 Yamaha XTZ 750 Super T?n?r?

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