Question about Yamaha YZ 450 F Motorcycles

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I need to know how tight I should tighten the rear and front axles after replacing the tires...

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You will need give the model and year since these torques are different.

Posted on Oct 12, 2010

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To know specifically how tight they should be, can only bedone with a torque wrench.

Please go to this site, it will provide you with the right values.

http://raskcycle.com/techtip/webdoc14.html

Posted on Oct 12, 2010

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1 Answer

Changed both front bearings,both u-joints,still getting vibration when speed reaches 50+mph.Tires are tight and balanced


didnt specify vehicle --generic answer --recheck balance,was alignment done after pars replaced is this an all wheel drive ,front wheel drive ,4wheel drive or rear drive vehicle --check c/v axles ,transfer axle /shafts -bent rims bad tire belt

Oct 25, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Chain will not stay on


Jessica:

First, check the chain and sprockets. Check the two chain sprockets for worn or bent teeth. If either of the sprockets is damaged, replace them. If the sprockets are OK, Check the chain for any damage If the chain is damaged, replace it. You are checking the chain for kinks, stiff links, damage to the link side connectors, and checking that the chain is not bent (side to side) Check to see If the chain is loose. If it is, you'll need to loosen the rear axle nuts and pull the rear tire backwards to tighten the chain, then tighten the rear axle nuts. *Make sure that the rear sprocket lines up with the front sprocket*. Just lay a straight edge along the two sprockets, ( A yardstick will do), and make sure that the sprockets touch the yardstick along the whole length of the sprockets. If the rear sprocket is cocked (not lined up with the front sprocket) loosen the axle nuts again and push on one side of the rear tire or the other side until the sprockets line up.
When you are finished tightening the rear axle nuts, pull up on the chain between the sprockets... the chain should not move up or down more than 1/8 of an inch. The chain will stretch over time, and you need to check the chain for looseness before riding.


Happy and safe riding!

Feb 01, 2014 | Razor MX500 Dirt Rocket

1 Answer

Hi, I tightened my honda cbf 600's chain but i can not loose it again and now it's too tight.


steps to loosen the chain on a CBF600:
-check the chain tension while the bike is sitting on the kickstand in neutral. It should have 1" to 1.5" FREEplay when measuring halfway between the front and rear sprocket.
-loosen the rear axe nut approx 1 full turn, this should require a 27mm socket.
-look for adjusting bolts on either side of the swingarm, sticking out from the rear plate. There will be an adjusting nut and lock nut on it.
- Loosen the 10mm locknuts on both sides (bringing it towards the rear of the bike) while holding the head of the 12mm adjusting nut from turning.
- Adjust both of the adjusting nuts outwards to loosen the chain, inwards to tighten the chain. 1/2 turn on the adjusting bolt will change the chain freeplay by about 10mm.
- Hold the 12mm nut, and snug the 10mm nut up to it. This will lock the adjusters in place.
- While holding the bike, press firmly on the back of the rear tire, This will move the rear wheel forward, and taking up any slack that was created by loosening the adjusting nuts.
- (Optional step but suggested) Use the hatch marks on the swingarm, just below the axle, to gauge whether the rear axle is adjusted evenly on both sides. Make any adjustments necessary to align the axle evenly on both sides. This will require moving the adjuster on one side ONLY. Consider your chain tension while doing this step (if necessary) since you can either loosen one side or tighten the other. After making any adjustments, press the wheel forward again and re-check your alignment.
- Using a 27mm socket, tighten the axle to the proper torque, which should be around 85 Ft.Lbs. If you are not sure about whether or not the axle nut was properly tightened, be sure to ride the bike carefully to a motorcycle shop and ask them to double check it.
-Finally, check the chain tension and make any adjustments necessary by following the previous steps.

Dec 10, 2012 | 2008 Honda CBF 600

1 Answer

When Coasting chain rolls backwards and falls off


Chains usually fall off because the chain is not tight enough. With the bike sitting upside down on the seat and handle bars the nuts on the rear axle should be loosened and the axle moved rearward so the chain tightens. When it is tight the nuts can be tightened. In addition to having a tight chain the rear axle nuts adjust the alignment of the wheel to the frame. You know you have it right if both the chain is tight and the tire closest to the crank is centered in the frame. The nuts should be tight enough so they don't allow the axle to move when you ride it. I hope this helps.

Aug 16, 2011 | Schwinn Windwood 26 Men s Cruiser Bicycle

1 Answer

I need to tighten my chain on my fzr 1000,its a 1987


The first step is to find the tightest part of the chain. Unless it's a brand new chain it will have a tight spot somewhere on it. It's easiest to do this with the bike on a race stand if you have it. Rotate the wheel and observe the lower part of the chain and watch it lift up when you hit tight spots. The spot where the chain lifts highest is the tightest part of the chain. Once you have found this spot, grab the chain on the low side under the swingarm and move it up and down. It should move up and down around 30-35mm or so, or an inch and a bit if you're an imperialist :) If the chain moves more or less than this then it needs to be adjusted.

To adjust the chain, you need to loosen the axle first. Don't take the nut off but it has to be loose enough to undo by hand. Using 2 spanners, unlock the lock nuts on the end of the swingarm and wind the nut in or out until you get the correct amount of chain slack. always do the sprocket side (left side) first, then repeat the same on the other side. Check the chain adjuster marks to make sure that the adjusters are equal on both sides, this will make sure your rear wheel is aligned properly.

Once you have adjusted the chain, tighten the rear axle and check again. The chain slack will change slightly after you tighten the axle, it might go tighter, it might go looser. Depends on the bike. But the chain slack must be correct with the axle tightened. A bit of practise here and you will be able to guess the correct amount before tightening the rear axle.

Once you have the slack set correctly and the axle is tight, make sure to tighten the adjusters. Tighten the front nut first against the swingarm plate so it can't move. Do it tight but not crazy tight. Then holding the first nut so it can't move tighten the locknut against the first nut. Repeat this on both sides.

If you are not quite sure if the chain is right, always err on the side of making it too loose rather than too tight. Running your chain too tight can destroy your output shaft bearing. It's only about $30 or so for a new one but your engine needs to be completely stripped down to replace it, it's not a fun job. I have seen a lot of FZs and FZRs have this problem because people ran chains too tight. If your chain really is too loose then it will start making your gear changes harder to do, that's the sign you need to tighten it.

Feb 14, 2011 | 1987 Yamaha FZR 1000

1 Answer

The bike makes a loud, rubbing noise. Any ideas?


The most common problem that causes a loud rubbing sound is a tire, usually the back tire, rubbing on the frame, and you can usually see exactly where it is rubbing. Brakes can rub too, but they usually are not that loud, so let's assume it is the tire. This happens when the rear axle wasn't tight enough, and when you pedal hard or hit a pothole, it can make the axle pivot in the slots it fits in, and this lets the tire to rub on the frame, usually on the front part of the rear tire.
Solution: For this kind of work, I usually flip the bike upside down on an old piece of carpet, etc. so it is sitting on the seat and handlebars with the front wheel pointing straight ahead. There are two common methods to secure the axle:
1. Two pretty good sized nuts, one on each side. Find a wrench that fits just right. I prefer a socket, box end or open end wrench, one for each side. On metric nuts, it will often be 14mm or 15mm, sometimes bigger. American sizes are usually in the 9/16 - 5/8 - 11/16" range. I strongly discourage you from using any kind of pliers or even an adjustable (crescent) wrench. You have to tighten these babies pretty tight, and you can easily burr the corners off your nuts with adjustable tools, believe me I've done it. The tricky part is you have to do three things at once. First, you have to keep the front part of the tire evenly spaced between the two sides of the frame. Next, you have to slide both sides of the axle back in their slots until the chain has the proper tension. If you have a ten-speed style bike, the derailler mechanism will adjust the tension automatically for you, so slide the axle all the way back until the side with the gears is against the back of its slot, and let the other side move forward or back as needed for the tire to be centered between the frame. Finally, while you are keeping things lined up - a patient friend who is willing to help makes this much easier, just have them hold the tire so it is evenly spaced between the frame, and then you have to tighten the nuts. If you don't have a ten-speed style gear changer on the back tire, you have to take up most of the slack in the chain yourself and hold it tight until you get those nuts tight enough to keep the axle from slipping. Don't be surprised if you have to loosen up the nuts and do it again - on a single speed bike you should have about 1/4" to 1/2" of flex in the middle of the chain, halfway between the front and rear sprockets. Too tight, and it can wear out your bearings or chain well before their time. Too loose, and your chain will fall off at the worst possible moment, and you will have to do this process all over again, after you push your bike back home. Tighten a little on each side until things get snug, and if the tire is still centered between the frame, do both sides again, harder now (grunt a little this time, it helps) and you should be good to go. Remember, you are not trying to strip the axle threads, or break anything, but you do have to get it tight enough so it won't slip on you again.
2. Oh, yeah, there is another common method you find pretty often on ten-speed style bikes, the quick release.
91177b4.jpg This is an assembly that consists of a lever built onto the axle nut, and the lever is only on one side. You don't use a wrench on the quick release, but they are a little tricky until you understand how they work. As you pull the lever away from the frame, a cam inside loosens the axle, and as you push the lever toward the frame, it tightens. When the lever is in the loose position, you can also spin the nut on the axle tighter or looser (careful, it doesn't take much, and clockwise should be tighter on most bikes). Tightening or loosening the nut part does most of travel, and the lever does the last little bit. The lever is short, usually only 2-3 inches, so if you don't have to push pretty hard on the lever, the nut is probably too loose, and you need to loosen the lever and rotate the nut part clockwise a little bit, until it feels like the axle is getting really good and tight just about the time the lever gets close to the frame. This can also take 2-3 tries of loosening the lever, tightening or loosening the nut, and retightening the lever again, until it feels good and tight, and of course, you have to check your tire alignment one more time to make sure it is still nicely centered between the frame of the bike. Turn the wheel by hand a few turns to make sure it doesn't rub on the frame. If everything is tight, and your tire is still centered, you're ready for a test ride. Just up and down the driveway to start with, and make sure your brakes are okay. Then you can go a little farther, and pedal a little harder. Hopefully the axle will be nice and solid, and you can say, "Good Job! I fixed it myself, on Fixya!"

May 09, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

Shakes in the front when I back off


Tighten the front wheel axle nut and the clamp nuts and bolts. Also check the headstock nuts and bolts for tightness. Make sure the front and rear wheel spokes are firm. Check the rear wheel axle and swing arm for looseness. Check the chain adjustment and make sure it is properly lubricated. Check both tires for condition and correct pressure. Has the bike had a front end accident?

Dec 29, 2009 | 1985 Honda CBX 750 F

1 Answer

Blade popping off front wheel


Is the axle tight? Has the tool been dropped to warp the frame? But a quick fix if everything else is OK is to loosen up the axle and put a THIN metal shim on the backside of the axle and then tightening it back down.

Jul 29, 2009 | Makita 2107F Portable Band Saw

1 Answer

Rear axle bearing replacement



REAR WHEEL BEARING/ HUB

Removal Procedure
  1. Raise the vehicle. Refer to Vehicle Lifting in General Diagnosis.
  2. Remove the wheel and the tire. Refer to Tire and Wheel Removal and Installation in Wheels, Tires and Alignment.
    1. Remove and support the brake caliper. Refer to Brake Caliper Replacement (Front) or Brake Caliper Replacement (Rear) in Brakes.
    2. Remove the brake rotor. Refer to Brake Rotor Replacement in Disc Brakes.
    3. Remove the ABS sensor wire connector.
    4. Remove the four bolts from the control arm.
    5. Remove the hub and bearing from the control arm.
    6. Remove the brake shield from the control arm.
    7. Clean the control arm face and the bore before installing the hub and the bearing.
    Installation Procedure

    Notice: Refer to Fastener Notice in Service Precautions.
    1. Install the brake shield and the hub and the bearing to the control arm with the four bolts. Be careful not to drop the hub and the bearing, as it could be damaged. Reconnect the ABS sensor. Tighten the hub and bearing bolts to 70 Nm (52 ft. lbs.).
    2. Install the brake rotor. Refer to Brake Rotor Replacement in Disc Brakes.
    3. Install the brake caliper. Refer to Brake Caliper Replacement (Front) or Brake Caliper Replacement (Rear) in Disc Brakes.
    4. Install the wheel and the tire. Refer to Tire and Wheel Removal and Installation in Wheels, Tires and Alignment. Tighten the wheel nuts to 140 Nm (100 ft. lbs.).
    5. Lower the vehicle.

Feb 14, 2009 | 2002 Pontiac Bonneville

1 Answer

Axil torque for a 2007 roadglide


On the front, 35-40 ft lbs, be sure to use a blue lock tight or lock washer. On the rear, tighten the rear axle nut snug to where the cotter pin can easily go through the axle and slots on the nut.

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