Question about Harley Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard Motorcycles

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How to test the voltage regulator - FLHT Electra Glide Standard Harley Davidson Motorcycles

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To test the voltage regulator, first you must have a FULLY charged battery in the bike. You'll need a good DVOM (digital volt ohm meter). Connect the DVOM across the battery, red lead to the positive post, black lead to the negative post. Put the meter's function switch in DC VOLTS, 20 VOLT range. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. You should read 14.5 to 15.0 volts within a few seconds of starting the engine.

To check the output of the alternator, put your meter's function switch in AC VOLTS, 50 VOLT range. Follow the two wires that come from the regulator down to where they connect to the alternator either at the engine case or a plug. Disconnect the plug and look inside. You'll see two metal contacts in the alternator side of the plug. Here's where you're going to check for voltage. Start the engine, bring it to a high idle, and insert one meter lead into each contact. Since you're measuring AC voltage, it makes no difference which lead goes where. You should read at least 25 volts on a Sportster and 30 volts on a Big Twin.

If your alternator checks good but at the battery the voltage checks low. Replace the regulator.

Good Luck
STeve

Posted on Oct 10, 2010

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EZGO TXT, what is the voltage I should see at the battery while engine running under load?


Around 15 + or - a little. This indicates the alternator is charging.

Oct 18, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

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I need a rectifier or avr for generac 3500 xl genarator


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  • Jun 28, 2016 | Generac Electrical Supplies

    1 Answer

    How to test voltage regaltor


    Voltage Regulator Bleed Test if the battery is discharging wile sitting unused.

    Ensure that the regulator is connected to battery, then unplug voltage regulator connector at the engine crankcase (the stator connector) to isolate the regulator from the stator windings. THEN using a test light, touch one probe to a suitable ground and touch the other to the regulator pins, one at a time. IF the tester light glows at any time the regulator is defective (shorted) and needs to be replaced.

    OTHERWISE:

    Motorcycle voltage regulator connections must be clean and tight for proper operation so it must be verified that both the AC (stator) connections and the DC (battery supply side) connectors are clean, fully inserted and locked in place with the regulator latches (they should also be coated with dielectric grease to keep them clean and corrosion free).

    The motorcycle voltage regulator is a series regulator that is also a rectifier that changes stator supplied alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) which the battery system requires. If the charging system does not keep the battery properly charged both with regards to Voltage (between 13 VDC minimum and 15.5 VDC maximum) and the current supply at a high enough amperage to meet the system lighting, ignition, TSM/TSSM, security and accessory requirements plus a minimum of 3.5 more amps (3.5 amps more than the foregoing system requirements) there are a number of tests that can be done to ascertain why.

    As the voltage regulator must have a good, clean, tight (and otherwise secure) ground connection for proper operation a Voltage Regulator Ground Circuit Test can be accomplished by connecting an ohmmeter to a known good ground (like the battery negative post) and the case of the regulator. If there is continuity with little resistance the ground is GOOD and nothing more needs to be done BUT if there is NO continuity or there is more than minimal resistance the ground will need to be fixed so there is a low resistance continuity by either locating and fixing the poor ground or adding a new grounding wire from the regulator case to a know good ground.

    A Voltage Regulator Power Circuit Test can be accomplished by turning OFF the Ignition, disconnecting the voltage regulator and with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting, testing for continuity between the voltage regulator wire harness supply terminal and the main fuse terminal (with the fuse removed) and if there is continuity present then the wiring circuit here is GOOD but if there is NO continuity then you will need to either find the open and repair it or replace the whole wire running from the voltage regulator to the main fuse.

    As there should be no short circuit in the power supply from the regulator to battery (main fuse) wiring OR in the regulator internal circuitry continuity from these both need to be checked again with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting. If the regulator to main fuse wiring connector is not disconnected from the regulator you can connect an ohmmeter with one lead on the regulator supply wire terminal end at the main fuse (with the main fuse removed) and the other lead to a known good ground. If there is NO continuity then you know that both the supply wire and the regulator are okay (as there is no short to ground). BUT if there is continuity then either the regulator or wiring or both is/are shorted to ground. To determine where there is a short circuit (i.e. either the wiring or the regulator internal circuitry) you must disconnect the DC side of the wiring harness (the connector at the DC side of the regulator) from the regulator and test between either or both ends of the wire i.e. from the regulator wire harness connector terminal and a known good ground and/or the main fuse terminal end of the wire and a known good ground. If there is any continuity the wire is shorted to ground and the short circuit must be found and repaired or the wire must be completely replaced. If there is no such continuity then the regulator DC supply terminal (with the DC side of the regulator connector disconnected) must be tested by putting one lead of an ohmmeter on the regulator terminal and the other on a known good ground. If there is continuity the regulator is shorted to ground and must be replaced. If there is a short in the wiring it is unlikely BUT the regulator could ALSO be internally shorted so it should also be checked either before or after any wiring short is located and repaired.

    The voltage regulator must also properly regulate the rectified DC voltage supplied to the battery so that it is not less than 13 VDC or more than 15.5 VDC. If the regulator is not properly limiting supply voltage to the battery to 15.5 VDC or less it will be overcharging the battery. This can be tested for by operating the motorcycle engine at 3000 rpm while placing a voltmeter between the battery positive and negative posts and reading the supplied voltage. If the reading is greater than 15.5 VDC the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the voltage is less than 15.5 VDC but more than 13 VDC the regulator and the rest of the charging system are operating correctly. If the supplied voltage is less than 13 VDC the AC side of the system must be tested and if the AC side is good but the supplied voltage at the battery is less than 13 VDC then the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the AC side of the system is not providing correct AC supply then the stator must be tested and if it is bad, replaced and if it is good then the rotor inspected (cannot be electrically tested as it consists of permanent magnets but it could be inspected fro physical damage and roughly tested for strong magnetic force fields by using a ferrous metal object to see if the attraction of the magnets is strong or weak, but this is basically a better guess rather than a precise measurement). The rotor can also be physically inspected for physical signs of damage including signs of the center hole having become oval AND the stator bolts inspected for possibly having come loose and into contact with the rotor.

    Sep 09, 2014 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHTC - FLHTCI...

    1 Answer

    Charging voltage to high, cooking batteries and head lights


    Hi, Anonymous you may need a new voltage regulator the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website 1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
    2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
    3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
    4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
    AC Output Check:
    Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
    Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
    Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
    The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
    Generic Specs:
    22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    Stator Resistance Check:
    Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
    Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
    Generic Specs:
    22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
    32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    Stator IB test or Ground Check:
    Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
    There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
    If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
    5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
    Identifying Wires:
    Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
    AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
    Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
    Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
    Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
    Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
    Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
    Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
    The reading should be Infinite.
    With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
    The reading should be Infinite.
    Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
    Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
    AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
    AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
    Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
    Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
    Ground AC output 1 Voltage
    Ground AC output 2 Voltage
    AC output 1 Ground ?
    AC output 2 Ground ?
    For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
    http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
    Electrical issue and fault finding chart
    Yamaha zeal 250 service manual
    Manuals Data Zealous
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    Dec 02, 2012 | 2000 Yamaha FZX 250 Zeal

    1 Answer

    I have an 04 thundercat and the charging voltage at the battery is only about 12.2 vdc what voltage should i have coming out of the stator before regulator


    Hi, Kenneth the following is a comprehensive charging system test that is guaranteed to the find issue with your system.
    1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
    2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
    3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
    4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
    5. AC Output Check:
    Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
    Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
    Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
    The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
    Generic Specs:
    22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
    Stator Resistance Check:
    Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
    Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
    Generic Specs:
    22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
    32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
    Stator IB test or Ground Check:
    Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
    Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
    There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
    If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
    5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
    Identifying Wires:
    Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
    AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
    Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
    Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
    Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
    Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
    Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
    Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
    The reading should be Infinite.
    With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
    The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
    Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
    The reading should be Infinite.
    Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
    Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
    AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
    AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
    Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
    Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
    Ground AC output 1 Voltage
    Ground AC output 2 Voltage
    AC output 1 Ground ?
    AC output 2 Ground ?
    For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
    http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
    HOW TO CHECK YOUR CHARGING SYSTEM and CHANGING the STATOR and REGULATOR...
    http://www.thundercat.nl/index.php/download/category/2-manuals
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    YAMAHA YZF600R Owner Manual
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    Aug 15, 2012 | 2002 Yamaha YZF 600 R thunder cat

    1 Answer

    Testing voltage regulator


    ENGINE OFF,UNPLUG the regulator, test continuity from each conductor to ground on the stator, if you have continuity STATOR IS SHORTED... if you test voltage OUTPUT at the stator, it should be around ten volts AC! NOT DC! per thousand RPM... THEN use a 12 volt test lite from regulator leads to ground, if ANY light happens at either lead, BAD regulator

    Aug 02, 2012 | 2002 Harley Davidson FXDWG Dyna Wide Glide

    1 Answer

    P1409


    DTC P1409: MEASURE RESISTANCE ACROSS EGR VACUUM REGULATOR SOLENOID
    Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) P1409 indicates that Self-Test has detected an electrical fault in the EVR circuit.

    Possible causes:

    Open EVR circuit.
    Open VPWR circuit to EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid.
    EVR circuit shorted to VPWR.
    EVR circuit shorted to GND.
    Damaged EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid.
    Damaged PCM.
    Key off.
    Disconnect EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid.
    Measure EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid resistance.
    Is solenoid resistance between 26 and 40 ohms?
    Yes No
    The EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid resistance is within specification. GO to HE111 . REPLACE EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid. RECONNECT all components. COMPLETE PCM Reset to clear DTCs. RERUN Quick Test.

    HE111 CHECK VPWR CIRCUIT VOLTAGE AT EGR VACUUM REGULATOR SOLENOID
    Key on, engine off.
    EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid disconnected.
    Measure voltage between VPWR circuit at the EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid vehicle harness connector and chassis GND.
    Is voltage greater than 10.5 volts?
    Yes No
    GO to HE112 . SERVICE open in VPWR circuit to EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid. RECONNECT all components. COMPLETE PCM Reset to clear DTCs. RERUN Quick Test.

    HE112 CHECK EVR CIRCUIT RESISTANCE
    Key off.
    EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid disconnected.
    Disconnect PCM. Inspect for damaged or pushed out pins, corrosion, loose wires. Service as necessary.
    Install breakout box and leave PCM disconnected.
    Measure resistance between Test Pin 47 (EVR) and EVR circuit at the EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid vehicle harness connector.
    Is resistance less than 5.0 ohms?
    Yes No
    GO to HE113 . SERVICE open in EVR circuit. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test.

    HE113 CHECK EVR CIRCUIT FOR SHORTS TO POWER OR GROUND
    Key off.
    EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid disconnected.
    Breakout box installed, leave PCM disconnected.
    Measure resistance between Test Pin 47 (EVR) and Test Pins 71 and 97 (VPWR) at the breakout box.
    Measure resistance between Test Pin 47 (EVR) and Test Pins 24 and 103 (PWR GND) at the breakout box.
    Is each resistance greater than 10,000 ohms?
    Yes No
    REPLACE damaged PCM. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test. SERVICE EVR circuit for short to VPWR or PWR GND. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test.

    HE120 CONTINUOUS MEMORY DTC P1409: WIGGLE EGR VACUUM REGULATOR SOLENOID WHILE MONITORING VPWR
    Continuous Memory DTC P1409 indicates that Continuous Memory Self-Test has detected an electrical malfunction in the EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid sometime during vehicle operation.

    Note: If DTC P1409 was output in Key On Engine Off (KOEO) or Key On Engine Running (KOER) Self-Test, go to HE110 to diagnose present fault.

    Possible causes:

    Open EVR circuit.
    Open VPWR circuit to EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid.
    EVR circuit shorted to VPWR.
    EVR circuit shorted to GND.
    Damaged EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid.
    Damaged PCM.
    Disconnect PCM. Inspect for damaged or pushed out pins, corrosion, loose wires.
    Install breakout box, leave PCM disconnected.
    Measure voltage between Test Pin 47 (EVR) and Test Pins 24 (PWR GND) at the breakout box.
    Key on.
    Voltage must read greater than 10.5 volts. For an indication of a fault, look for this voltage to drop while performing the following:
    Lightly tap on the EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid.
    Wiggle the EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid connector.
    Grasp the EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid vehicle harness connector and wiggle wires between solenoid and PCM.
    Is a fault indicated?
    Yes No
    ISOLATE fault and SERVICE as necessary. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test. Unable to duplicate or identify fault at this time. GO to Pinpoint Test Step Z1 with the following data: DPFEGR and EGRVR PIDs and list of possible causes.

    Sep 25, 2011 | 2001 Mazda Tribute

    2 Answers

    My battery light is on all time on the dash, why?


    There is a fault in your battery or the alternator or voltage regulator. It is most likely the alternator as in this model the voltage regulator should be built into the alternator. You can remove the alternator and have it tested at Auto Zone or Advance auto or Pep Boys, most major auto parts stores offer to test them to make sure that is the problem. Since you would have to trade in the old one as a Core to get the new one it only makes sense to have it tested first anyway.

    Jun 04, 2011 | 1997 Honda Odyssey

    1 Answer

    The computer in our 2003 Ford focus is not having the alternator charge the battery . we have had all things tested ie.. alternator,battery,all the wires..they say it is the computer, not sure if we should...


    sounds to me like you have a bad voltage regulator. The voltage regulator will shut off the flow of juice to the battery if it exceeds a level, usually 14.5 volts. So if the alternator is over charging then the voltage regulator will shut off the flow to keep your battery form dying completely and having to be replaced. Now a days the regulator is located in the alternator.

    that was your education for the day. :)

    If they only tested the charge the alternator puts out and it passed they most likely bypassed the voltage regulator. If the voltage regulator is bad then you will still need a new alternator.
    follow the link below and read the full field testing portion for a better explanation if you dont understand my explanation.

    anything else? just post it :)

    http://books.google.com/books?id=3q85p56_PxIC&pg=PA84&lpg=PA84&dq=test+voltage+regulator+inside+alternator&source=bl&ots=neLFU7USZK&sig=fmzJ2GjbxqULa9pU2UHylJahYS0&hl=en&ei=r9bySvXhNo2Xtge89omuAw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CBIQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=test%20voltage%20regulator%20inside%20alternator&f=false

    Nov 04, 2009 | 2005 Ford Focus

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