Question about 2003 Yamaha WR 250 F

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How do u check the engine oil ;do they have a inspection glass

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On The Right Side under de brake pedal check for oil bubble

Posted on Oct 09, 2010

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1996 model 550 MXCi. Need to replace gear oil. How much and what type of oil should I use?


oil Only use synthetic high-quality oils (Motorex Power Synt 4T) meeting or surpassing the quality requirements of API classes SG, or SH (for specifications see containers). ! CAUTION ! INSUFFICIENT OIL OR POOR QUALITY OIL RESULTS IN PREMATURE WEAR OF THE ENGINE. Checking the engine oil level The engine oil level can be checked when the engine is cold or warm. To check, place the motorcycle in an upright position on a level surface (center stand). If the engine is cold, the oil level should be visible at the lower edge A of the inspection glass. If the engine is warm, the oil level should be visible at the upper edge B of the inspection glass. Add engine oil if necessary. ! CAUTION ! - INSUFFICIENT AMOUNTS OF OR LOW-GRADE ENGINE OIL LEAD TO PREMATURE WEAR IN THE ENGINE. - DO NOT OVERFILL THE ENGINE CASE. - DO NOT UNDERFILL THE ENGINE CASE.  - + 0°C 32°F 15W 40 15W 50
KTM motorcycle manuals

Nov 20, 2015 | KTM Motorcycles

1 Answer

How do I check the oil in a 2002 Chevy cavalier


Oil rises when it is hot..So with engine cold and not running set parking brake,get safety glasses.get a shop towel..Remove oil dipstick and wipe it clean..Inspect stick and it will show you where oil level should be....Stick it back in slowly until it bottoms out..Remove slowly and check level...

Feb 20, 2015 | 2002 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

Replace sight glass ducati pantah


Hi, Rick sorry you can't find the first and best tool you ever bought for your Ducati despair not, for a mere $10 you can download another one. For more information about your issue and free valuable downloads that you will need please visit the websites below. Good luck and have a nice day.
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Ducati 500 SL Pantah PDF Motorcycle Service Shop Manual Repair Guide...
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Ducati Maintenance

Oct 21, 2012 | Ducati 500 Pantah Motorcycles

2 Answers

Purchased focus sport 2006 model no service manual. Mileage 43,000 kms. Need to know service intervals either time/mileage perhaps a copy of the service schedule will suffice.


These maintenance intervals come from the maintenance interval calculator
at www.autozone.com, using a starting point of 25,800 miles (43000 km), and
assuming 1000 miles (1666 km) driven per month, and "severe driving conditions," which
are actually normal usage characteristics, such as frequent short trips, urban driving, waiting in traffic, driving in hot weather, trips under 16 km in cold weather, etc.

STARTING MILEAGE: 25800 (43,000 Kilometers)
Item
Action
Service History

20000 miles or 32000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


21000 miles or 33600 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


24000 miles or 38400 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


25000 miles or 40000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


27000 miles or 43200 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


30000 miles or 48000 kilometers

Battery Check
Air Filter Element Check
Wheel Bearing Lubricate
Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Fuel Filter Replace
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Fluid - A/T Replace
Cabin Air Filter Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Cooling System Inspect
Wheel Bearing Inspect
Ball Joint Inspect
Drive/Propeller Shaft Inspect
Exhaust System Inspect
Steering and Suspension Inspect
Heat Shield, Exhaust Inspect
Tires Rotate


33000 miles or 52800 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


35000 miles or 56000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


36000 miles or 57600 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


39000 miles or 62400 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


40000 miles or 64000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate



42000 miles or 67200 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


45000 miles or 72000 kilometers

Battery Check
Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Fuel Filter Replace
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Cabin Air Filter Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Cooling System Inspect
Wheel Bearing Inspect
Ball Joint Inspect
Drive/Propeller Shaft Inspect
Steering and Suspension Inspect
Tires Rotate


48000 miles or 76800 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


50000 miles or 80000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


51000 miles or 81600 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


54000 miles or 86400 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


55000 miles or 88000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


57000 miles or 91200 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


60000 miles or 96000 kilometers

Battery Check
Air Filter Element Check
Wheel Bearing Lubricate
Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Fuel Filter Replace
Spark Plug Replace
Fluid Filter - A/T Replace
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Fluid - A/T Replace
Cabin Air Filter Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Cooling System Inspect
Wheel Bearing Inspect
Ball Joint Inspect
Drive/Propeller Shaft Inspect
Exhaust System Inspect
Steering and Suspension Inspect
Heat Shield, Exhaust Inspect
Tires Rotate


63000 miles or 100800 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


65000 miles or 104000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


66000 miles or 105600 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


69000 miles or 110400 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


70000 miles or 112000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate


72000 miles or 115200 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


75000 miles or 120000 kilometers

Battery Check
Air Filter Element Check
Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Fuel Filter Replace
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Cabin Air Filter Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Cooling System Inspect
Wheel Bearing Inspect
Ball Joint Inspect
Drive/Propeller Shaft Inspect
Steering and Suspension Inspect
Tires Rotate


78000 miles or 124800 kilometers

Steering and Suspension Lubricate
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace


80000 miles or 128000 kilometers

Battery Check
Oil Filter, Engine Replace
Engine Oil Replace
Vehicle Inspect
Brakes and Traction Control Inspect
Tires Rotate



And you can continue the pattern from there...

May 14, 2011 | Ford Focus Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Air conditioner


System Inspection
Although the A/C system should not be serviced by the do-it-yourselfer, preventive maintenance can be practiced and A/C system inspections can be performed to help maintain the efficiency of the vehicle's A/C system. For A/C system inspection, perform the following: The easiest and often most important check for the air conditioning system consists of a visual inspection of the system components. Visually inspect the air conditioning system for refrigerant leaks, damaged compressor clutch, abnormal compressor drive belt tension and/or condition, plugged evaporator drain tube, blocked condenser fins, disconnected or broken wires, blown fuses, corroded connections and poor insulation.
CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS Refrigerant leaks show up as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines, and especially on the hose and tubing connections. If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a certified air conditioning specialist.
Fig. 1: Run your hand along the underside of all hose connections and check for leaks. If you find a leak, have it fixed by a certified air conditioning specialist.
check%20ac%20leak.jpg KEEPING THE CONDENSER CLEAR Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush.

Fig. 1: The position of the condenser in front of the radiator makes it particularly susceptible to collecting debris. Periodically, remove the accumulated bugs, leaves and other trash from the condenser. ac%202.gif
CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT LEVEL There are two ways to check refrigerant level. On vehicles equipped with sight glasses, checking the refrigerant level is a simple matter. Many late model vehicles, however, do not have a sight glass, and you have to check the temperature of the lines to determine the refrigerant level.
With Sight Glass The sight glass is normally located in the head of the receiver/drier. The receiver/drier is not hard to locate. It's a large metal cylinder that looks something like a fire extinguisher. Sometimes the sight glass is located in one of the metal lines leading from the top of the receiver/drier. Once you've found it, wipe it clean and proceed as follows:
  1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
  2. Cycle the air conditioner on and off to make sure what you are seeing is clear refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system off and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the off cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running, and the airflow from the unit in the vehicle is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
  3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant. Have it checked by a professional.
  4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as a series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost.
  1. Fig. 1: Oils streaks (A), constant bubbles (B) or foam (C) indicate there is not enough refrigerant in the system. Occasional bubbles during the initial operation are normal. A clear sight glass indicates a proper charge of refrigerant or no refrigerant at all, which can be determined by the presence of cold air at the outlets in the vehicle. If the glass is clouded with a milky white substance, have the receiver/dryer checked by a certified air conditioning specialist. ac%203.jpg

Without Sight Glass On vehicles that are not equipped with sight glasses, it is necessary to feel the temperature difference in the inlet and outlet lines at the receiver/drier to gauge the refrigerant level. Use the following procedure:
  1. Locate the receiver/drier. It will generally be up front near the condenser. It is shaped like a small fire extinguisher and will always have two lines connected to it. One line goes to the expansion valve and the other goes to the condenser.
  2. With the engine and the air conditioner running, hold a line in each hand and gauge their relative temperatures. If they are the same approximate temperatures, the system is correctly charged.
  3. If the line from the expansion valve to the receiver/drier is a lot colder than the line from the receiver/drier to the condenser, then the system is overcharged. It should be noted that this is an extremely rare condition.
  4. If the line that leads from the receiver/drier to the condenser is a lot colder than the other line, the system is undercharged.
  5. If the system is undercharged or overcharged, have it checked by a professional air conditioning mechanic.
Fig. 3: Checking the refrigerant charge if the system has no sight glass. ac%204.jpg

Feb 19, 2011 | 1997 Suzuki Sidekick

1 Answer

What does the looking glass supposed to look like if full


Hi, do you mean the oil inspection glass, located on the righthand engine cover?, this should have a level of oil about two thirds full from the bottom,with the remaining 1third oil free.

Feb 18, 2011 | 1982 Suzuki GS 650 GT

1 Answer

Air conditioning not working


System Inspection
Although the A/C system should not be serviced by the do-it-yourselfer, preventive maintenance can be practiced and A/C system inspections can be performed to help maintain the efficiency of the vehicle's A/C system. For A/C system inspection, perform the following: The easiest and often most important check for the air conditioning system consists of a visual inspection of the system components. Visually inspect the air conditioning system for refrigerant leaks, damaged compressor clutch, abnormal compressor drive belt tension and/or condition, plugged evaporator drain tube, blocked condenser fins, disconnected or broken wires, blown fuses, corroded connections and poor insulation.
CHECKING FOR OIL LEAKS Refrigerant leaks show up as oily areas on the various components because the compressor oil is transported around the entire system along with the refrigerant. Look for oily spots on all the hoses and lines, and especially on the hose and tubing connections. If there are oily deposits, the system may have a leak, and you should have it checked by a certified air conditioning specialist.
Fig. 1: Run your hand along the underside of all hose connections and check for leaks. If you find a leak, have it fixed by a certified air conditioning specialist.
check%20ac%20leak.jpg KEEPING THE CONDENSER CLEAR Periodically inspect the front of the condenser for bent fins or foreign material (dirt, bugs, leaves, etc.). If any cooling fins are bent, straighten them carefully. You can remove any debris with a stiff bristle brush.

Fig. 1: The position of the condenser in front of the radiator makes it particularly susceptible to collecting debris. Periodically, remove the accumulated bugs, leaves and other trash from the condenser. ac%202.gif
CHECKING THE REFRIGERANT LEVEL There are two ways to check refrigerant level. On vehicles equipped with sight glasses, checking the refrigerant level is a simple matter. Many late model vehicles, however, do not have a sight glass, and you have to check the temperature of the lines to determine the refrigerant level.
With Sight Glass The sight glass is normally located in the head of the receiver/drier. The receiver/drier is not hard to locate. It's a large metal cylinder that looks something like a fire extinguisher. Sometimes the sight glass is located in one of the metal lines leading from the top of the receiver/drier. Once you've found it, wipe it clean and proceed as follows:
  1. With the engine and the air conditioning system running, look for the flow of refrigerant through the sight glass. If the air conditioner is working properly, you'll be able to see a continuous flow of clear refrigerant through the sight glass, with perhaps an occasional bubble at very high temperatures.
  2. Cycle the air conditioner on and off to make sure what you are seeing is clear refrigerant. Since the refrigerant is clear, it is possible to mistake a completely discharged system for one that is fully charged. Turn the system off and watch the sight glass. If there is refrigerant in the system, you'll see bubbles during the off cycle. If you observe no bubbles when the system is running, and the airflow from the unit in the vehicle is delivering cold air, everything is OK.
  3. If you observe bubbles in the sight glass while the system is operating, the system is low on refrigerant. Have it checked by a professional.
  4. Oil streaks in the sight glass are an indication of trouble. Most of the time, if you see oil in the sight glass, it will appear as a series of streaks, although occasionally it may be a solid stream of oil. In either case, it means that part of the charge has been lost.
  1. Fig. 1: Oils streaks (A), constant bubbles (B) or foam (C) indicate there is not enough refrigerant in the system. Occasional bubbles during the initial operation are normal. A clear sight glass indicates a proper charge of refrigerant or no refrigerant at all, which can be determined by the presence of cold air at the outlets in the vehicle. If the glass is clouded with a milky white substance, have the receiver/dryer checked by a certified air conditioning specialist. ac%203.jpg

Without Sight Glass On vehicles that are not equipped with sight glasses, it is necessary to feel the temperature difference in the inlet and outlet lines at the receiver/drier to gauge the refrigerant level. Use the following procedure:
  1. Locate the receiver/drier. It will generally be up front near the condenser. It is shaped like a small fire extinguisher and will always have two lines connected to it. One line goes to the expansion valve and the other goes to the condenser.
  2. With the engine and the air conditioner running, hold a line in each hand and gauge their relative temperatures. If they are the same approximate temperatures, the system is correctly charged.
  3. If the line from the expansion valve to the receiver/drier is a lot colder than the line from the receiver/drier to the condenser, then the system is overcharged. It should be noted that this is an extremely rare condition.
  4. If the line that leads from the receiver/drier to the condenser is a lot colder than the other line, the system is undercharged.
  5. If the system is undercharged or overcharged, have it checked by a professional air conditioning mechanic.
Fig. 3: Checking the refrigerant charge if the system has no sight glass. ac%204.jpg

Feb 04, 2011 | 1986 Jaguar XJSC

1 Answer

Check oil level


Standard 'oil in frame' inspection is to make sure (through the engine sight glass that there is oil) start it, let it warm up, leave it for 7-10 mins and check the level of the glass. oil should be visible and ideally not more than 1/2 way up the window.
hope this helps.

Sep 11, 2010 | 1993 Suzuki VS 800 Intruder

2 Answers

Engine oil


This bike does not have a dipstick; Instead, there is a sight glass low on the right side of the crankcase. To get an accurate reading of the oil level, the bike has to be level, not on the side stand.

Please let me know if this is helpful.

May 16, 2010 | 2005 Suzuki Boulevard C50T

2 Answers

Check the oil


There is a small glass inspection window on the lower flange of the clutch cover (r.h.s.)
Picture of part attached.

Leave bike to cool on the centre stand allowing all oil to drain to sump and inspect window for oil level. It should just cover the window when bike is level. If the window is blackened from oil stains and no oil movement is detected, drain oil, remove clutch cover and clean window from inside with solvent and replace, replace oil with 2200cc oil, Cheers.510a044.jpg

May 12, 2010 | 1980 Yamaha XJ 650

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