Question about Yamaha XT 660 R Motorcycles

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2001 raptor 660r with k&n air filter and full Yoshimura exhaust I need to know the settings for the carburetor jets, needles, and pilot jets

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Will need to fit larger pilot and main jet
size will depend where you are as colder climate will need to be richer than warm climate, normally 1 size up from std on pilot and 2 on main

Posted on Sep 02, 2010

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Yamaha carb settings


Hi, Anonymous if you have changed your fuel delivery system, air filter size or flow rate, mufflers or exhaust system your carburetors need re-tuning and if your fuel system (gas tank, filters, fuel valve and carburetor) is contaminated with ethanol sludge, varnish, rust, dirt, water etc. or your bike has been sitting for months or years without running these components must be "PROPERLY" cleaned and reassembled "CORRECTLY" before any adjustments can be made. Tuning your carburetor is fairly simple once you understand the basic principals. You engine is a simple airbox sucking air in and blowing it out, it is finely tuned at the factory for maximum performance once you upset that delicate balance by changing air filters, camshafts or exhaust systems your performance may go down the and the engine may run poorly, you need to compensate the air-fuel mixture in the carburetor in order for the engine to run smoothly and at peak performance. If you are running multi carburetors you need to sync them first and make sure your air cleaner element is clean and dry for paper elements or lightly oiled for foam and meshed elements and properly installed. Here is how and where you compensate trouble: "TIP" if your engine "BOGS" your not getting enough fuel.
1. Closed to 1/8 throttle is managed by the air screw and pilot/slow jet.
2. 1/8 to 1/4 throttle is managed by the air-screw, pilot/slow jet, and throttle slide.
3. 1/4 to 1/2 throttle is managed by the throttle slide and jet needle.
4. 1/2 to 3/4 throttle is managed by the jet needle, needle jet, main jet, and air jet.
5. 3/4 to wide open throttle is managed by the main jet and air jet.
6. Wide open throttle is managed by the main jet.
If you are running lean, spark plug electrode color is white, engine runs hot and feels like it is starving for fuel you need to go up on the jet size or move the c-clip down one notch. If you are running rich, spark plug color is black or dark gray, engine runs cool, and bogs down when accelerating you need to go down on jet size or move the c-clip up one notch. When your carburetor is properly tuned for maximum performance your spark plug electrode will be a light tan color like coffee with cream. If you prefer fuel economy over performance you can go down on main jet sizes until a satisfactory level of lower performance is acceptable versus MPH, your spark plug color will be whiter and your engine will run warmer. These tuning adjustments will only make improvements if your intake and exhaust system have no air leaks or sealing issues and the entire electrical system is in proper working order and you have no mechanical issues. For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the websites below. Good luck and have nice a day.
Need help wth 06 WR450 carb set up Intake Jetting Fuel Injection
How To 4 Stroke MX Fuel Screw Adjustment YZF CRF KXF RMZ FCR Part 1 of 2
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Jul 20, 2014 | 2006 Yamaha WR 450 F

1 Answer

Adjust carburetor yamaha 125 ttr


Hi, Anonymous if you have changed your fuel delivery system, air filter size or flow rate, mufflers or exhaust system your carburetors need re-tuning and if your fuel system (gas tank, filters, fuel valve and carburetor) is contaminated with ethanol sludge, varnish, rust, dirt, water etc. or your bike has been sitting for months or years without running these components must be "PROPERLY" cleaned and reassembled "CORRECTLY" before any adjustments can be made. Tuning your carburetor is fairly simple once you understand the basic principals. You engine is a simple airbox sucking air in and blowing it out, it is finely tuned at the factory for maximum performance once you upset that delicate balance by changing air filters, camshafts or exhaust systems your performance may go down the and the engine may run poorly, you need to compensate the air-fuel mixture in the carburetor in order for the engine to run smoothly and at peak performance. If you are running multi carburetors you need to sync them first and make sure your air cleaner element is clean and dry for paper elements or lightly oiled for foam and meshed elements and properly installed. Here is how and where you compensate trouble: "TIP" if your engine "BOGS" your not getting enough fuel.
1. Closed to 1/8 throttle is managed by the air screw and pilot/slow jet.
2. 1/8 to 1/4 throttle is managed by the air-screw, pilot/slow jet, and throttle slide.
3. 1/4 to 1/2 throttle is managed by the throttle slide and jet needle.
4. 1/2 to 3/4 throttle is managed by the jet needle, needle jet, main jet, and air jet.
5. 3/4 to wide open throttle is managed by the main jet and air jet.
6. Wide open throttle is managed by the main jet.
If you are running lean, spark plug electrode color is white, engine runs hot and feels like it is starving for fuel you need to go up on the jet size or move the c-clip down one notch. If you are running rich, spark plug color is black or dark gray, engine runs cool, and bogs down when accelerating you need to go down on jet size or move the c-clip up one notch. When your carburetor is properly tuned for maximum performance your spark plug electrode will be a light tan color like coffee with cream. If you prefer fuel economy over performance you can go down on main jet sizes until a satisfactory level of lower performance is acceptable versus MPH, your spark plug color will be whiter and your engine will run warmer. These tuning adjustments will only make improvements if your intake and exhaust system have no air leaks or sealing issues and the entire electrical system is in proper working order and you have no mechanical issues. For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the websites below. Good luck and have nice a day.
Stock TTR125 Carb Screw Settings TTR
Ttr 125 Carb Idol settings
http://www.yamaha-motor.com/assets/service/manuals/2007/LIT-11626-20-01_ttr125all_1961.pdf
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-tt-owners-manuals

Jun 21, 2014 | 2006 Yamaha TTR 125 E

1 Answer

How can i adjust the fuel richness on my carburetor on my WR 426


Hi, Ibergen if you have changed your fuel delivery system, air filter size or flow rate, mufflers or exhaust system or a significant change in altitude your carburetors need re-tuning and if your fuel system (gas tank, filters, fuel valve and carburetor) is contaminated with ethanol sludge, varnish, rust, dirt, water etc. or your bike has been sitting for months or years without running these components must be "PROPERLY" cleaned and reassembled "CORRECTLY" before any adjustments can be made. Tuning your carburetor is fairly simple once you understand the basic principals. You engine is a simple airbox sucking air in and blowing it out, it is finely tuned at the factory for maximum performance once you upset that delicate balance by changing air filters, camshafts or exhaust systems your performance may go down the and the engine may run poorly, you need to compensate the air-fuel mixture in the carburetor in order for the engine to run smoothly and at peak performance. If you are running multi carburetors you need to sync them first and make sure your air cleaner element is clean and dry for paper elements or lightly oiled for foam and meshed elements and properly installed. Here is how and where you compensate trouble: "TIP" if your engine "BOGS" your not getting enough fuel.
1. Closed to 1/8 throttle is managed by the air screw and pilot/slow jet.
2. 1/8 to 1/4 throttle is managed by the air-screw, pilot/slow jet, and throttle slide.
3. 1/4 to 1/2 throttle is managed by the throttle slide and jet needle.
4. 1/2 to 3/4 throttle is managed by the jet needle, needle jet, main jet, and air jet.
5. 3/4 to wide open throttle is managed by the main jet and air jet.
6. Wide open throttle is managed by the main jet.
If you are running lean, spark plug electrode color is white, engine runs hot and feels like it is starving for fuel you need to go up on the jet size or move the c-clip down one notch. If you are running rich, spark plug color is black or dark gray, engine runs cool, and bogs down when accelerating you need to go down on jet size or move the c-clip up one notch. When your carburetor is properly tuned for maximum performance your spark plug electrode will be a light tan color like coffee with cream. If you prefer fuel economy over performance you can go down on main jet sizes until a satisfactory level of lower performance is acceptable versus MPH, your spark plug color will be whiter and your engine will run warmer. These tuning adjustments will only make improvements if your intake and exhaust system have no air leaks or sealing issues and the entire electrical system is in proper working order and you have no mechanical issues. For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the websites below. Good luck and have nice a day.
Yamaha 426 fuel screw adjustment
Carburetor Set up 101
YAMAHA WR426F Owner Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
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Jan 28, 2013 | Yamaha WR 426 F Motorcycles

1 Answer

Wont start


Instructions
    • 1 Remove the seat by unscrewing the bolts found on the four corners of the seat. Remove the clamps from the top of the air box using a pair of pliers to access and remove the air filter. The air filter is removed by unscrewing the wing nut and sliding the filter out of the box. Loosen the hose clamp that connects the carburetor to the intake manifold, using a screwdriver.
    • 2 Loosen the fuel delivery hose clamp with a screwdriver and pull the carburetor out of the Blaster. Before troubleshooting the carburetor, it's important to note whether you've made a significant change in altitude or a change in your exhaust/intake setup. If you've made an altitude change, installed an aftermarket exhaust pipe or modified your air box, the jets will need to be changed. Refer to your manual for specific re-jetting instructions based on your altitude. Your exhaust kit will provide a recommended jetting setup. Do-it-yourself modifications like removing an air box will require you to experiment with the jet setup until you find the right one.
    • 3 Disassemble the carburetor by unscrewing the bowl screws from the bottom of the carburetor. With the bowl removed, the float, pilot jet and main jet will be exposed. To remove the pilot and main jet, unscrew them from their respective holes. The main jet will sit in the exact center of the bowl, while the smaller pilot jet will be set just below the main jet.
      Use a blunt object like a stick or rod to push the bottom of the needle receiver assembly out of the carburetor. The needle receiver (which houses the needle jet) will slide out of the top of the carburetor along with the slide, spring, carburetor cap and gasket. The carburetor is now completely disassembled and ready to be inspected.
    • 4 Inspect the pilot jet for blockage, slide a thin wire through the pilot jet's hole, spray it with carburetor spray and blow the center hole with compressed air. Repeat this process with the main jet. If there is any blockage or wear, replace the jets. If you have made altitude changes or exhaust/intake modifications, insert jets that correspond to your changes as recommended in your manual. Note that this may take some experimentation with different jets to get the correct jet setup, as there are many jet sizes for different scenarios.
    • 5 Inspect the bowl, floats and ports for any signs of debris or gunk. If debris or gunk is found, remove it using a spray carburetor cleaner, soft wire brush, or thin wire (to insert into small orifices). If no gunk or debris is found, you've ruled this out as a possible cause for the starting issues, and can focus on the replacement of carburetor components.
    • 6 Look for abnormal wearing on the jets, float valve, gaskets, O-rings and springs. If you have not changed altitude or modified your bike in any way, then it is best to inspect these components. Any one of these components, or a combination, may be contributing to your starting issues. You may choose to replace individual parts such as a new float valve, though replacing all the interior components with a carburetor "rebuild kit" is advised. Rebuild kits can be ordered online or through your dealer, and will ensure your carburetor is fully repaired.
    • 7 Slide the gasket, spring, spring holder and needle jet assembly back onto the carburetor cap and insert the assembly into the top of the carburetor. Screw the main jet into the bottom of the needle jet assembly by accessing it through the bowl area. Screw the pilot jet back into its hole below the main jet. Clip the float valve onto its hinge within the bowl a insert the bowl gasket. Screw the bowl to the bottom of the carburetor to complete the re-assembly process.
    • 8 Re-attach the carburetor to the intake manifold using the hose clamp and screwdriver. Slide the fuel feeder line onto the brass receiver port on the side of the carburetor and slide the air box boot over the carburetor's intake port, which should be facing toward the back of the bike. Re-install the air filter with its wing nut, slide the clips over the air box top to secure it to the box and slide the seat into place. Re-install the seat screws to complete the re-assembly process.
    • 9 Prime the carburetor by twisting the throttle once and start the Blaster.

Jan 14, 2013 | Yamaha V Star 1100 Custom Motorcycles

1 Answer

What size are the factory jets in a 2001 Honda Shadow 600?


Hi, Debbie if you have changed your fuel delivery system, air filter size or flow rate, mufflers or exhaust system or a significant change in altitude your carburetors need re-tuning and if your fuel system (gas tank, filters, fuel valve and carburetor) is contaminated with ethanol sludge, varnish, rust, dirt, water etc. or your bike has been sitting for months or years without running these components must be "PROPERLY" cleaned and reassembled "CORRECTLY" before any adjustments can be made. Tuning your carburetor is fairly simple once you understand the basic principals. You engine is a simple airbox sucking air in and blowing it out, it is finely tuned at the factory for maximum performance once you upset that delicate balance by changing air filters, camshafts or exhaust systems your performance may go down the and the engine may run poorly, you need to compensate the air-fuel mixture in the carburetor in order for the engine to run smoothly and at peak performance. If you are running multi carburetors you need to sync them first and make sure your air cleaner element is clean and dry for paper elements or lightly oiled for foam and meshed elements and properly installed. Here is how and where you compensate trouble: "TIP" if your engine "BOGS" your not getting enough fuel.
1. Closed to 1/8 throttle is managed by the air screw and pilot/slow jet.
2. 1/8 to 1/4 throttle is managed by the air-screw, pilot/slow jet, and throttle slide.
3. 1/4 to 1/2 throttle is managed by the throttle slide and jet needle.
4. 1/2 to 3/4 throttle is managed by the jet needle, needle jet, main jet, and air jet.
5. 3/4 to wide open throttle is managed by the main jet and air jet.
6. Wide open throttle is managed by the main jet.
If you are running lean, spark plug electrode color is white, engine runs hot and feels like it is starving for fuel you need to go up on the jet size or move the c-clip down one notch. If you are running rich, spark plug color is black or dark gray, the engine runs cool, and bogs down when accelerating you need to go down on jet size or move the c-clip up one notch. When your carburetor is properly tuned for maximum performance your spark plug electrode will be a light tan color like coffee with cream. If you prefer fuel economy over performance you can go down on main jet sizes until a satisfactory level of lower performance is acceptable versus MPH, your spark plug color will be whiter and your engine will run warmer. These tuning adjustments will only make improvements if your intake and exhaust system have no air leaks or sealing issues and the entire electrical system is in proper working order and you have no mechanical issues.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
VLX 600 Re Jet
Carburator Theory and Tuning
http://www.vt600vlx.com/VLX%20VT600%2097%20and%20up%20Service%20Manual.pdf
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda VT600C Owner Manual

Jul 23, 2012 | 2001 Honda VT 600 C Shadow

1 Answer

Hi was wondering if anyone was familiar with a Yamaha fj1250 carbs for tuning needle size emulsion tubes etc cheers


Hi, Robbieburgoy if you have changed your fuel delivery system, air filter size or flow rate, mufflers or exhaust system or a significant change in altitude your carburetors need re-tuning and if your fuel system (gas tank, filters, fuel valve and carburetor) is contaminated with ethanol sludge, varnish, rust, dirt, water etc. or your bike has been sitting for months or years without running these components must be "PROPERLY" cleaned and reassembled "CORRECTLY" before any adjustments can be made. Tuning your carburetor is fairly simple once you understand the basic principals. You engine is a simple airbox sucking air in and blowing it out, it is finely tuned at the factory for maximum performance once you upset that delicate balance by changing air filters, camshafts or exhaust systems your performance may go down the and the engine may run poorly, you need to compensate the air-fuel mixture in the carburetor in order for the engine to run smoothly and at peak performance. If you are running multi carburetors you need to sync them first and make sure your air cleaner element is clean and dry for paper elements or lightly oiled for foam and meshed elements and properly installed. Here is how and where you compensate trouble: "TIP" if your engine "BOGS" your not getting enough fuel.
1. Closed to 1/8 throttle is managed by the air screw and pilot/slow jet.
2. 1/8 to 1/4 throttle is managed by the air-screw, pilot/slow jet, and throttle slide.
3. 1/4 to 1/2 throttle is managed by the throttle slide and jet needle.
4. 1/2 to 3/4 throttle is managed by the jet needle, needle jet, main jet, and air jet.
5. 3/4 to wide open throttle is managed by the main jet and air jet.
6. Wide open throttle is managed by the main jet.
If you are running lean, spark plug electrode color is white, engine runs hot and feels like it is starving for fuel you need to go up on the jet size or move the c-clip down one notch. If you are running rich, spark plug color is black or dark gray, engine runs cool, and bogs down when accelerating you need to go down on jet size or move the c-clip up one notch. When your carburetor is properly tuned for maximum performance your spark plug electrode will be a light tan color like coffee with cream. If you prefer fuel economy over performance you can go down on main jet sizes until a satisfactory level of lower performance is acceptable versus MPH, your spark plug color will be whiter and your engine will run warmer. These tuning adjustments will only make improvements if your intake and exhaust system have no air leaks or sealing issues and the entire electrical system is in proper working order and you have no mechanical issues. For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the websites below. Good luck and have nice a day.
FJR1300 Throttle Body Synchronization
Carburator Theory and Tuning
Yamaha XJR1300 99 Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
Yamaha XJR1300 Owner Manual

May 08, 2012 | 2001 Yamaha FJR 1300

1 Answer

Shadow 1100 sabre carb setting on cobra exhaust


Hi, Hitmagedz if you have changed your fuel delivery system, air filter size or flow rate, mufflers or exhaust system or a significant change in altitude your carburetors need re-tuning and if your fuel system (gas tank, filters, fuel valve and carburetor) is contaminated with ethanol sludge, varnish, rust, dirt, water etc. or your bike has been sitting for months or years without running these components must be "PROPERLY" cleaned and reassembled "CORRECTLY" before any adjustments can be made. Tuning your carburetor is fairly simple once you understand the basic principals. You engine is a simple airbox sucking air in and blowing it out, it is finely tuned at the factory for maximum performance once you upset that delicate balance by changing air filters, camshafts or exhaust systems your performance may go down the and the engine may run poorly, you need to compensate the air-fuel mixture in the carburetor in order for the engine to run smoothly and at peak performance. If you are running multi carburetors you need to sync them first and make sure your air cleaner element is clean and dry for paper elements or lightly oiled for foam and meshed elements and properly installed. Here is how and where you compensate trouble: "TIP" if your engine "BOGS" your not getting enough fuel.
1. Closed to 1/8 throttle is managed by the air screw and pilot/slow jet.
2. 1/8 to 1/4 throttle is managed by the air-screw, pilot/slow jet, and throttle slide.
3. 1/4 to 1/2 throttle is managed by the throttle slide and jet needle.
4. 1/2 to 3/4 throttle is managed by the jet needle, needle jet, main jet, and air jet.
5. 3/4 to wide open throttle is managed by the main jet and air jet.
6. Wide open throttle is managed by the main jet.
If you are running lean, spark plug electrode color is white, engine runs hot and feels like it is starving for fuel you need to go up on the jet size or move the c-clip down one notch. If you are running rich, spark plug color is black or dark gray, the engine runs cool, and bogs down when accelerating you need to go down on jet size or move the c-clip up one notch. When your carburetor is properly tuned for maximum performance your spark plug electrode will be a light tan color like coffee with cream. If you prefer fuel economy over performance you can go down on main jet sizes until a satisfactory level of lower performance is acceptable versus MPH, your spark plug color will be whiter and your engine will run warmer. These tuning adjustments will only make improvements if your intake and exhaust system have no air leaks or sealing issues and the entire electrical system is in proper working order and you have no mechanical issues.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Honda Shadow 1100 Carburetor Jetting PegMonkey
Carburator Theory and Tuning
Honda shadow vt1100 Owners Workshop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda VT1100C2 Owner Manual Page 3

Apr 10, 2012 | 2001 Honda VT 1100 C2 Shadow Sabre

1 Answer

1992 Suzuki GSF 400 Bandit carburetor jetting


Hi, Crazystang79 if you have changed your fuel delivery system, air filter size or flow rate, mufflers or exhaust system or a significant change in altitude your carburetors need re-tuning and if your fuel system (gas tank, filters, fuel valve and carburetor) is contaminated with ethanol sludge, varnish, rust, dirt, water etc. or your bike has been sitting for months or years without running these components must be "PROPERLY" cleaned and reassembled "CORRECTLY" before any adjustments can be made. Tuning your carburetor is fairly simple once you understand the basic principals. You engine is a simple airbox sucking air in and blowing it out, it is finely tuned at the factory for maximum performance once you upset that delicate balance by changing air filters, camshafts or exhaust systems your performance may go down the and the engine may run poorly, you need to compensate the air-fuel mixture in the carburetor in order for the engine to run smoothly and at peak performance. If you are running multi carburetors you need to sync them first and make sure your air cleaner element is clean and dry for paper elements or lightly oiled for foam and meshed elements and properly installed. Here is how and where you compensate trouble: "TIP" if your engine "BOGS" your not getting enough fuel.
1. Closed to 1/8 throttle is managed by the air screw and pilot/slow jet.
2. 1/8 to 1/4 throttle is managed by the air-screw, pilot/slow jet, and throttle slide.
3. 1/4 to 1/2 throttle is managed by the throttle slide and jet needle.
4. 1/2 to 3/4 throttle is managed by the jet needle, needle jet, main jet, and air jet.
5. 3/4 to wide open throttle is managed by the main jet and air jet.
6. Wide open throttle is managed by the main jet.
If you are running lean, spark plug electrode color is white, engine runs hot and feels like it is starving for fuel you need to go up on the jet size or move the c-clip down one notch. If you are running rich, spark plug color is black or dark gray, engine runs cool, and bogs down when accelerating you need to go down on jet size or move the c-clip up one notch. When your carburetor is properly tuned for maximum performance your spark plug electrode will be a light tan color like coffee with cream. If you prefer fuel economy over performance you can go down on main jet sizes until a satisfactory level of lower performance is acceptable versus MPH, your spark plug color will be whiter and your engine will run warmer. These tuning adjustments will only make improvements if your intake and exhaust system have no air leaks or sealing issues and the entire electrical system is in proper working order and you have no mechanical issues.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Carb Rebuilding Needle Jets Jet Needles etc
Carburator Theory and Tuning
Suzuki GSF 400 BANDIT Service Manual
OEM parts for Suzuki
http://mybikemanuals.com/suzuki

May 17, 2017 | 1992 Suzuki GSF 400 Bandit

1 Answer

2001 Honda Shadow 1100 Sabre is running hot with new jet kit and exhaust system


Hi, Anonymous "ABSOLUTELY" not being jetted "PROPERLY" if you have changed your fuel delivery system, air filter size or flow rate, mufflers or exhaust system or a significant change in altitude your carburetors need re-tuning and if your fuel system (gas tank, filters, fuel valve and carburetor) is contaminated with ethanol sludge, varnish, rust, dirt, water etc. or your bike has been sitting for months or years without running these components must be "PROPERLY" cleaned and reassembled "CORRECTLY" before any adjustments can be made. Tuning your carburetor is fairly simple once you understand the basic principals. You engine is a simple airbox sucking air in and blowing it out, it is finely tuned at the factory for maximum performance once you upset that delicate balance by changing air filters, camshafts or exhaust systems your performance may go down the and the engine may run poorly, you need to compensate the air-fuel mixture in the carburetor in order for the engine to run smoothly and at peak performance. If you are running multi carburetors you need to sync them first and make sure your air cleaner element is clean and dry for paper elements or lightly oiled for foam and meshed elements and properly installed. Here is how and where you compensate trouble: "TIP" if your engine "BOGS" your not getting enough fuel.
1. Closed to 1/8 throttle is managed by the air screw and pilot/slow jet.
2. 1/8 to 1/4 throttle is managed by the air-screw, pilot/slow jet, and throttle slide.
3. 1/4 to 1/2 throttle is managed by the throttle slide and jet needle.
4. 1/2 to 3/4 throttle is managed by the jet needle, needle jet, main jet, and air jet.
5. 3/4 to wide open throttle is managed by the main jet and air jet.
6. Wide open throttle is managed by the main jet.
If you are running lean, spark plug electrode color is white, engine runs hot and feels like it is starving for fuel you need to go up on the jet size or move the c-clip down one notch. If you are running rich, spark plug color is black or dark gray, the engine runs cool, and bogs down when accelerating you need to go down on jet size or move the c-clip up one notch. When your carburetor is properly tuned for maximum performance your spark plug electrode will be a light tan color like coffee with cream. If you prefer fuel economy over performance you can go down on main jet sizes until a satisfactory level of lower performance is acceptable versus MPH, your spark plug color will be whiter and your engine will run warmer. These tuning adjustments will only make improvements if your intake and exhaust system have no air leaks or sealing issues and the entire electrical system is in proper working order and you have no mechanical issues.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Honda Shadow 1100 Carburetor Jetting PegMonkey
Carburator Theory and Tuning
Honda shadow vt1100 Owners Workshop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda VT1100C2 Owner Manual Page 3

May 21, 2010 | 2001 Honda VT 1100 C2 Shadow Sabre

1 Answer

2002 Honda CR 250 R carburetor tuning


Hi, Lymangroverg if you have changed your fuel delivery system, air filter size or flow rate, mufflers or exhaust system or a significant change in altitude your carburetors need re-tuning and if your fuel system (gas tank, filters, fuel valve and carburetor) is contaminated with ethanol sludge, varnish, rust, dirt, water etc. or your bike has been sitting for months or years without running these components must be "PROPERLY" cleaned and reassembled "CORRECTLY" before any adjustments can be made. Tuning your carburetor is fairly simple once you understand the basic principals. You engine is a simple airbox sucking air in and blowing it out, it is finely tuned at the factory for maximum performance once you upset that delicate balance by changing air filters, camshafts or exhaust systems your performance may go down the and the engine may run poorly, you need to compensate the air-fuel mixture in the carburetor in order for the engine to run smoothly and at peak performance. If you are running multi carburetors you need to sync them first and make sure your air cleaner element is clean and dry for paper elements or lightly oiled for foam and meshed elements and properly installed. Here is how and where you compensate trouble: "TIP" if your engine "BOGS" your not getting enough fuel.
1. Closed to 1/8 throttle is managed by the air screw and pilot/slow jet.
2. 1/8 to 1/4 throttle is managed by the air-screw, pilot/slow jet, and throttle slide.
3. 1/4 to 1/2 throttle is managed by the throttle slide and jet needle.
4. 1/2 to 3/4 throttle is managed by the jet needle, needle jet, main jet, and air jet.
5. 3/4 to wide open throttle is managed by the main jet and air jet.
6. Wide open throttle is managed by the main jet.
If you are running lean, spark plug electrode color is white, engine runs hot and feels like it is starving for fuel you need to go up on the jet size or move the c-clip down one notch. If you are running rich, spark plug color is black or dark gray, the engine runs cool, and bogs down when accelerating you need to go down on jet size or move the c-clip up one notch. When your carburetor is properly tuned for maximum performance your spark plug electrode will be a light tan color like coffee with cream. If you prefer fuel economy over performance you can go down on main jet sizes until a satisfactory level of lower performance is acceptable versus MPH, your spark plug color will be whiter and your engine will run warmer. These tuning adjustments will only make improvements if your intake and exhaust system have no air leaks or sealing issues and the entire electrical system is in proper working order and you have no mechanical issues.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
2002 CR250R carb settings
Carburator Theory and Tuning
1985 1987 Fourtrax 250 Service Manual pdf
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda CR250R Owner Manual Competition Handbook

Apr 29, 2010 | 2002 Honda CR 250 R

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