Question about 2000 kawasaki ZX-12R

1 Answer

I have a 2000 Kawi ZX1200R. I have had to replace voltage regulator & the battery twcie in the space of 8 months. The mechanic that has done the work claims the my problem with the voltage regulator is that when i wash my bike i'm not blowing the water off of it. Please give me your thoughts.

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Top Expert:

    An expert who has finished #1 on the weekly Top 10 Fixya Experts Leaderboard.

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

  • kawasaki Master
  • 40,627 Answers

Hi Ccjr82, the washing of the bike should have nothing to do with the failing voltage regulator, the bike is designed to be driven in rain. My guess is you may have a bad battery ground connection to the frame or broken cable end in the harness, or weak alternator and for more information about your question please visit the website below. Good luck and have a nice day.
2000 Kawasaki Motorcycle Service Repair Workshop Manuals

Posted on Sep 27, 2015

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 492 Answers

SOURCE: generator warning light stays on dimly and

Your charging system should be checked. It should put out 13-14.5 volts to charge the battery. How is you battery? Does it run down a lot? If so its because the battery system is not getting charged. Try changing the voltage regulator first then look at a burned stator.

Posted on Apr 30, 2009

  • 13 Answers

SOURCE: the wires going to the voltage regulator keep burning up.

Common problem with poor quality parts, the regulator is the problem, the generator is working other wise you would not have fried the wiring, you answered your own question. someone telling porkies to get more money from unsuspecting client?
The regulator controls the voltage not the generator, the generator only supplys the voltage it cannot overcharge unless the regulator is not working properly, simple!

Posted on Jul 28, 2009

protvrepair
  • 153 Answers

SOURCE: i haved the original owners

Found them on ebay.. Most were around 9.95.

Posted on Nov 11, 2010

wd4ity
  • 4565 Answers

SOURCE: battery went dead while on the road, voltage gauge

yes, it could be the regulator or the stator in the alternator.

To check the regulator, fully charge your battery and reinstall it in the bike. Now connect a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) "across" the battery by connecting the red meter lead to the positive post of the battery and the black meter lead to the negative post of the battery. Put the meter's function selector in DC VOLTS, 20 VOLT OR GREATER range. Start the engine and bring the engine to a high idle. The meter should read 14.5-15.0 volts. If not, you need to check the stator.

Find the stator plug where the regulator wires plug into the engine cases in the front of the engine. Unplug the wires and look into the engine side of the plug. there will be two contacts. this is where we'll be testing the output voltage. Put your meter's function selector switch in AC VOLTS, 50 VOLTS OR GREATER RANGE. Notice this time you're measuring AC VOLTAGE not DC voltage. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Stick one meter lead (either one) into on contact in the engine side of the plug and the other lead into the other contact. Do not allow the probes to touch each other or the side of the case. You should be reading at least 30 volts at a high idle rpm. If you are, then the regulator is bad. If you are not reading at least 30 volts, your stator is bad and must be replaced.

Good Luck
Steve

Posted on Jan 31, 2011

  • 409 Answers

SOURCE: Can a bad voltage regulator cause the main 30 amp fuse to blow?

Usually a bad regulator will only cause problems with charging...
Sounds like you've got a short somewhere in the wiring...I'd start by checking the ignition switch wiring and the connections going into the fuse box.

Posted on Mar 20, 2012

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

My battery keeps dieing


take it to an accredited auto electrician as it indicates that the voltage regulator is not in the circuit and the alternator is boiling the battery from way over voltage

Jul 18, 2017 | 1994 Chevrolet Camaro

1 Answer

Looking for help charging system not charging battery on 1999 Harley Davidson fatboy


Check regulator ground by using an ohmmeter with one lead on a known good ground, such as the battery ground cable, and the other on the regulator base.
The connection where the alternator stator wires plug into the regulator could be corroded/dirty and need to be cleaned and sprayed with electrical contact cleaner and protected with dielectric grease because corroded wires going to the battery or alternator from the stator or the regulator will affect the ability of the charging system to properly charge a battery.

Motorcycle voltage regulator connections must be clean and tight for proper operation so it must be verified that both the AC (stator) connections and the DC (battery supply side) connectors are clean, fully inserted and locked in place with the regulator latches (they should also be coated with dielectric grease to keep them clean and corrosion free).

The motorcycle voltage regulator is a series regulator that is also a rectifier that changes stator supplied alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) which the battery system requires. If the charging system does not keep the battery properly charged both with regards to Voltage (between 13 VDC minimum and 15.5 VDC maximum) and the current supply at a high enough amperage to meet the system lighting, ignition, TSM/TSSM, security and accessory requirements plus a minimum of 3.5 more amps (3.5 amps more than the foregoing system requirements) there are a number of tests that can be done to ascertain why.

As the voltage regulator must have a good, clean, tight (and otherwise secure) ground connection for proper operation a Voltage Regulator Ground Circuit Test can be accomplished by connecting an ohmmeter to a known good ground (like the battery negative post) and the case of the regulator. If there is continuity with little resistance the ground is GOOD and nothing more needs to be done BUT if there is NO continuity or there is more than minimal resistance the ground will need to be fixed so there is a low resistance continuity by either locating and fixing the poor ground or adding a new grounding wire from the regulator case to a know good ground.

A Voltage Regulator Power Circuit Test can be accomplished by turning OFF the Ignition, disconnecting the voltage regulator and with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting, testing for continuity between the voltage regulator wire harness supply terminal and the main fuse terminal (with the fuse removed) and if there is continuity present then the wiring circuit here is GOOD but if there is NO continuity then you will need to either find the open and repair it or replace the whole wire running from the voltage regulator to the main fuse.

As there should be no short circuit in the power supply from the regulator to battery (main fuse) wiring OR in the regulator internal circuitry continuity from these both need to be checked again with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting. If the regulator to main fuse wiring connector is not disconnected from the regulator you can connect an ohmmeter with one lead on the regulator supply wire terminal end at the main fuse (with the main fuse removed) and the other lead to a known good ground. If there is NO continuity then you know that both the supply wire and the regulator are okay (as there is no short to ground). BUT if there is continuity then either the regulator or wiring or both is/are shorted to ground. To determine where there is a short circuit (i.e. either the wiring or the regulator internal circuitry) you must disconnect the DC side of the wiring harness (the connector at the DC side of the regulator) from the regulator and test between either or both ends of the wire i.e. from the regulator wire harness.

AC Output Check
Disconnect the voltage regulator connector from the alternator stator wiring and then connect an AC voltmeter across both stator sockets of a two wire stator, or if a three wire stator across two of the three for example 1 & 3 and then later you will repeat the test between 2 & 3 and later between 1 & 2. THEN run the engine at as close as possible in the circumstances to 2000 RPM. The AC output should be approximately 32-40 VAC, approximately 16-20VAC per 1000 RPM. If you have done a stator static test and the stator has proven to be in good mechanical condition and the AC output is below specifications, the charging problem is going to be a faulty rotor. If you have not done a static stator check yet and the AC output is less than as set out above it may be that the stator is defective and the static stator check will need to be done. While the regulator has nothing whatsoever to do with the alternator output, if the alternator output is good the regulator might be defective in either rectification or in limiting the output to the battery to under 15 VDC. If AC output is low and the stator has passed the static stator check then it is likely that the permanent magnets in the alternator rotor are weak. A permanent magnet can lose its magnetic strength if it is dropped or shocked such as letting it snap into place when being installed or possibly by use of an impact wrench to remove the compensator fastener etc.

May 27, 2014 | Harley Davidson FLSTF - FLSTFI Fat Boy...

1 Answer

Why battery not charging, test bat its good


Could be a bad regulator or alternator.

The connection where the alternator stator wires plug into the regulator could be corroded/dirty and need to be cleaned and sprayed with electrical contact cleaner and protected with dielectric grease because corroded wires going to the battery or alternator from the stator or the regulator will affect the ability of the charging system to properly charge a battery.

Check regulator ground by using an ohmmeter with one lead on a known good ground, such as the battery ground cable, and the other on the regulator base.

Current and Voltage Output Test
This test requires a load tester. As it appears that many shops/techs do not understand electricity and as they are relatively expensive testers many shops do not even have one. If you have one connect the negative and positive leads to the battery terminals, place the load tester induction pickup over the positive regulator cable and run the engine at 3000 RPM, increasing the load until a constant voltage reading of 13.0 VDC is obtained. At this point the current output should be 26 to 32 AMPS. Make a note of this reading as it will be used if a TOTAL CURRENT DRAW TEST will also be done. (A rider's riding habits, i.e. rpm of the engine while usual riding is being done could be significantly lower than 3000 RPM which would mean that less than the above optimal voltages would be produced so a rider in too high a gear for a given speed might have too low an operating RPM and thereby produce less current than is required to meet the bike's electrical load demands.)
CAUTION
Do not under any circumstances leave any load switch turned on for more than 20 seconds or overheating and tester damage are quite likely to occur.

Voltage Output Test
After removing the load, read the load tester voltage meter AND if voltage to the battery is not more than 15 VDC then voltage output is within specifications but if the voltage is higher then the regulator is not functioning properly or there are lose or dirty connections present.

AC Output Check
Disconnect the voltage regulator connector from the alternator stator wiring and then connect an AC voltmeter across both stator sockets of a two wire stator, or if a three wire stator across two of the three for example 1 & 3 and then later you will repeat the test between 2 & 3 and later between 1 & 2. THEN run the engine at as close as possible in the circumstances to 2000 RPM. The AC output should be approximately 32-40 VAC, approximately 16-20VAC per 1000 RPM. If you have done a stator static test and the stator has proven to be in good mechanical condition and the AC output is below specifications, the charging problem is going to be a faulty rotor. If you have not done a static stator check yet and the AC output is less than as set out above it may be that the stator is defective and the static stator check will need to be done. While the regulator has nothing whatsoever to do with the alternator output, if the alternator output is good the regulator might be defective in either rectification or in limiting the output to the battery to under 15 VDC. If AC output is low and the stator has passed the static stator check then it is likely that the permanent magnets in the alternator rotor are weak. A permanent magnet can lose its magnetic strength if it is dropped or shocked such as letting it snap into place when being installed or possibly by use of an impact wrench to remove the compensator fastener etc.

Rotor Inspection
Inspect the rotor for physical signs of damage. THEN remove center bolt and inspect for signs of the center hole having become oval and ensure that the stator bolts have not come loose and come into contact with the rotor.

May 08, 2014 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage...

1 Answer

2004 Ultra classic won't charge battery


Motorcycle voltage regulator connections must be clean and tight for proper operation so it must be verified that both the AC (stator) connections and the DC (battery supply side) connectors are clean, fully inserted and locked in place with the regulator latches (they should also be coated with dielectric grease to keep them clean and corrosion free).

The motorcycle voltage regulator is a series regulator that is also a rectifier that changes stator supplied alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) which the battery system requires. If the charging system does not keep the battery properly charged both with regards to Voltage (between 13 VDC minimum and 15.5 VDC maximum) and the current supply at a high enough amperage to meet the system lighting, ignition, TSM/TSSM, security and accessory requirements plus a minimum of 3.5 more amps (3.5 amps more than the foregoing system requirements) there are a number of tests that can be done to ascertain why.

As the voltage regulator must have a good, clean, tight (and otherwise secure) ground connection for proper operation a Voltage Regulator Ground Circuit Test can be accomplished by connecting an ohmmeter to a known good ground (like the battery negative post) and the case of the regulator. If there is continuity with little resistance the ground is GOOD and nothing more needs to be done BUT if there is NO continuity or there is more than minimal resistance the ground will need to be fixed so there is a low resistance continuity by either locating and fixing the poor ground or adding a new grounding wire from the regulator case to a know good ground.

A Voltage Regulator Power Circuit Test can be accomplished by turning OFF the Ignition, disconnecting the voltage regulator and with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting, testing for continuity between the voltage regulator wire harness supply terminal and the main fuse terminal (with the fuse removed) and if there is continuity present then the wiring circuit here is GOOD but if there is NO continuity then you will need to either find the open and repair it or replace the whole wire running from the voltage regulator to the main fuse.

As there should be no short circuit in the power supply from the regulator to battery (main fuse) wiring OR in the regulator internal circuitry continuity from these both need to be checked again with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting. If the regulator to main fuse wiring connector is not disconnected from the regulator you can connect an ohmmeter with one lead on the regulator supply wire terminal end at the main fuse (with the main fuse removed) and the other lead to a known good ground. If there is NO continuity then you know that both the supply wire and the regulator are okay (as there is no short to ground). BUT if there is continuity then either the regulator or wiring or both is/are shorted to ground. To determine where there is a short circuit (i.e. either the wiring or the regulator internal circuitry) you must disconnect the DC side of the wiring harness (the connector at the DC side of the regulator) from the regulator and test between either or both ends of the wire i.e. from the regulator wire harness connector terminal and a known good ground and/or the main fuse terminal end of the wire and a known good ground. If there is any continuity the wire is shorted to ground and the short circuit must be found and repaired or the wire must be completely replaced. If there is no such continuity then the regulator DC supply terminal (with the DC side of the regulator connector disconnected) must be tested by putting one lead of an ohmmeter on the regulator terminal and the other on a known good ground. If there is continuity the regulator is shorted to ground and must be replaced. If there is a short in the wiring it is unlikely BUT the regulator could ALSO be internally shorted so it should also be checked either before or after any wiring short is located and repaired.

The voltage regulator must also properly regulate the rectified DC voltage supplied to the battery so that it is not less than 13 VDC or more than 15.5 VDC. If the regulator is not properly limiting supply voltage to the battery to 15.5 VDC or less it will be overcharging the battery. This can be tested for by operating the motorcycle engine at 3000 rpm while placing a voltmeter between the battery positive and negative posts and reading the supplied voltage. If the reading is greater than 15.5 VDC the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the voltage is less than 15.5 VDC but more than 13 VDC the regulator and the rest of the charging system are operating correctly. If the supplied voltage is less than 13 VDC the AC side of the system must be tested and if the AC side is good but the supplied voltage at the battery is less than 13 VDC then the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the AC side of the system is not providing correct AC supply then the stator must be tested and if it is bad, replaced and if it is good then the rotor inspected (cannot be electrically tested as it consists of permanent magnets but it could be inspected fro physical damage and roughly tested for strong magnetic force fields by using a ferrous metal object to see if the attraction of the magnets is strong or weak, but this is basically a better guess rather than a precise measurement). The rotor can also be physically inspected for physical signs of damage including signs of the center hole having become oval AND the stator bolts inspected for possibly having come loose and into contact with the rotor.


AC Output Check
Disconnect the voltage regulator connector from the alternator stator wiring and then connect an AC voltmeter across both stator sockets of a two wire stator, or if a three wire stator across two of the three for example 1 & 3 and then later you will repeat the test between 2 & 3 and later between 1 & 2. THEN run the engine at as close as possible in the circumstances to 2000 RPM. The AC output should be approximately 32-40 VAC, approximately 16-20 VAC per 1000 RPM. If you have done a stator static test and the stator has proven to be in good mechanical condition and the AC output is below specifications, the charging problem is going to be a faulty rotor. If you have not done a static stator check yet and the AC output is less than as set out above it may be that the stator is defective and the static stator check will need to be done. While the regulator has nothing whatsoever to do with the alternator output, if the alternator output is good the regulator might be defective in either rectification or in limiting the output to the battery to under 15 VDC. If AC output is low and the stator has passed the static stator check then it is likely that the permanent magnets in the alternator rotor are weak. A permanent magnet can lose its magnetic strength if it is dropped or shocked such as letting it snap into place when being installed or possibly by use of an impact wrench to remove the compensator fastener etc.

Apr 28, 2014 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

2002 Harley ultra high voltage


Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12 volts or better after charging.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor. Good luck

Sep 23, 2013 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

2nd newly rebuilt alternator burning out.


Due to the nature of the battery technology used with vehicles the alternator is mostly incapable of charging the battery. The car alternator is designed to keep a fully charged battery fully charged and to provide all the power for the car equipment.

The alternator charge rate is regulated by a voltage regulator. Because the alternator output is connected to the battery, the alternator and battery voltage will be the same and the voltage regulator monitors that voltage.

The lower the battery voltage the more output the alternator will produce in order to correct the situation but because a lead acid battery has a high internal resistance to accepting a charge the terminal voltage will quickly rise to the alternator regulated voltage and fool the alternator into thinking the battery is fully charged when the output will drop to the order of just a couple of amps.

Switch on the headlights or a similar load that will lower the battery voltage and the alternator will increase it's output again - but only by the amount of current the headlamps or other load is consuming.
It matters not what the alternator rated maximum output is, it is designed to provide only the necessary current and no more.

The only time an alternator should ever need to produce maximum output is when on a dedicated testbed and then only for a short duration to avoid damaging the unit. Testing the current output on a modern vehicle is not recommended except for the regulated voltage testing and a rule-of-thumb output test where all equipment is switched on and the engine speed raised while the battery voltage is monitored.

Most modern alternators use an internal voltage regulator but a few systems use a separate voltage regulator. No alternator rebuild would be complete without a regulator test and probably a new or replacement regulator, which is where the majority of charging system problems are, or the brush gear.
Assuming the wiring is ok, no alternator should suffer any harm if the voltage regulator and auxilliary diodes (if fitted) are in good order though fitting a defective or a discharged battery can cause it to overheat and be damaged.

The alternator usually just about stops producing an output when the battery voltage is in the region of 14.5/14.8 volts.
Your description indicates the voltage regulator is not working correctly - unless 40 amps was being consumed by the car equipment the alternator should not have been producing 40 amps.. I suggest you also have your battery tested

May 12, 2017 | 1988 Acura Legend

1 Answer

Major electrical issue. Always a draw on the battery ... Went through 12 batteries and finally put a dump truck battery in it. Replaced the alternator as well. Now the car will not start at all. Three...


Hello. Install amp meter on the battery main feed. One the amp meter is coupled by direct or induced coupling. Start remove the fuses and watch the amp meter and when the amp meter indicator drops that one of the circuit that have some shorted or running. Now they can be more than one circuit that is operating when it shouldn't.

First thing with the amp meter connect disconnect the alternator. Do get wrong here. It a percaution if you happen to concur a large short. Also, when disconnecting the alternator look at the amp meter to see if there is a drop in current being used.

An alternator is a three phase AC generator. There are 6 to 8 high current diodes hook up where it turn the three phase AC voltage to DC voltage half wave + side of the AC. Then this DC voltage being combined voltages goes to a regulator which smooth out the voltage to 13.8 volts approx. The 13.8 DC voltage is need to recharge the battery. Because the vehicle operates on 12 voltage system it uses the battery for the constant voltages of 12 volts and a story house of current. stewbison

Aug 20, 2011 | 2004 Chrysler Pacifica

1 Answer

I have a 2005 dodge grand caravan. The battery light came on so I had the battery checked and it checked out ok. The alternator is relatively new (8 months). It has now develope a miss in the engine. We...


The code P2503 is Charging system voltage is low

Take a Muti meter and check the voltage output of the alternator Put the red lead on the red wire of the alternator and the black lead on the negative side of the battery and then start the engine. The voltage should read between 13.9 - 14.2 volts if it does not then you have a bad alternator or voltage regulator. Either way you have to replace the alternator because the voltage regulator is built in to the alternator.It does not matter if it is only 8 months old some times you can get bad parts. Hope fully you kept the receipt for the alternator because being only 8 months old it would be covered under a parts warraty which is usually at least 1 year on alternators.If you had a garage replace it then take it back to them they should replace it under warranty and it should not cost you a dime for labour either since they installed the first one. If you can't check the output voltage yourself take it to Autozone or Partsource they usually do this test on alternators for free.

Apr 30, 2011 | Dodge Caravan Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Can I use a 8 volt battery on a 6 volt tractor or will it trip the voltage regulator and blcck the generator?


YOU CAN USE AN 8 VOLT BATTERY, IT SHOULDN'T HURT ANYTHING. THE ONLY THING IS IT WON'T STAY FULLY CHARGED. THE GENERATOR IS DESIGNED FOR A 6 VOLT BATTERY NOT 8 VOLTS. WHAT I DO IS CHANGE THE SYSTEM TO 12 VOLTS. NOTHING WILL HAVE TO BE DONE TO THE STARTER, IF THE TRACTOR STARTS LIKE IT IS SUPPOSED TO. IT WILL JUST START FASTER. YOU WILL NEED NEW POINTS & CONDENSER & A RESISTOR FOR THE DISTRIBUTOR. ALSO A 12 VOLT BATTERY & A MID 1970'S INTERNALLY REGULATED ALTERNATOR, MOUNTED IN PLACE OF THE GENERATOR. THIS A LITTLE WORK BUT THE TRACTOR WILL START AMAZINGLY FAST. I HAVE DONE THIS SEVERAL TIMES & IT WORKS GREAT. IF THE FUEL GAUGE STILL WORKS YOU WILL NEED A SPECIAL RESISTOR FOR THAT. OF COURSE ANY LIGHTS WILL HAVE TO BE CHANGED TO 12 VOLT GOOD LUCK. DR. VOLT.

Jan 25, 2011 | Ford Expedition Cars & Trucks

Not finding what you are looking for?
2000 kawasaki ZX-12R Logo

109 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top kawasaki Experts

Arnie Burke
Arnie Burke

Level 3 Expert

4514 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

75744 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22114 Answers

Are you a kawasaki Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...