Question about 2003 Harley Davidson FXDL Dyna Low Rider

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Replace the Battery and Regulator but still not holding a charge. Stator was check and is ok.

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The very first thing to do is to take the battery to an automotive parts house. Ask them to load test the battery for you. If the battery isn't up to par, it won't hold a charge.

Now, with a fully charged battery, connect a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) to the battery. Red lead of the meter to the positive post, black meter lead to the negative post. Put the meter's function switch in "DC VOLTS, 20 VOLT or greater range". Start the bike and bring the engine to a high idle. The meter should build up rapidly to read between 14.5 and 15.0 volts. If it does not. Move on to the stator.

Down on the left side of the engine cases, find and unplug the plug for the voltage regulator. Look down into the plug in the engine case. You'll see to metal contacts. You are going to put your meter leads on these contacts. First, change the setting on your meter to "AC VOLTS, 50 VOLTS or greater". Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Put one meter lead on each metal contact down in the plug. It make no difference which lead goes to which contact because we are measuring in AC voltage. Your meter should read at least 30 volts or more. If not, your stator is not up to snuff.

If your stator is putting out enough voltage and the battery is getting 14.5 volts or better, it would appear that your charging system is working as designed. Now, that doesn't mean that it is ALWAYS working as it should. I fought a charging system on a 1991 FXR once for months. It would do fine most of the time but every once in a while, the battery would be dead. Even after a good ride it would be dead. We never could "catch" the charging system messing up. The owner finally got disgusted and had me change the entire system, stator, rotor, and regulator. No more problems. I would guess that the stator or regulator had an intermittant short or open circuit in it somewhere. At any rate, the entire thing went into the recycle bin.

Good Luck
steve

Posted on Aug 25, 2010

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03 wr 250 is blowing light bulbs


Hi, Dean the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website 1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
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YAMAHA WR250F Owner Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-wr-owners-manuals

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1 Answer

Battery wont hold a charge. Testing stator n regulator/rectifyer both checked out ok. connectors look good along with wires. pulled stator out to check it visually also... looks like new. Im puzzled?


Have you put a meter across the battery to check its charging? I would expect to get 13.5 volts plus if the charging sytem is working.
It sounds like you have done all the good checks, but what about the battery itself? A failing battery can drag the charging sytem down. I would charge it up and ask a shop to load check it, or keep it off the bike and monitor if its holding charge for a few days. If it drops below 12 volts, it had it.

Sep 15, 2010 | 2007 Triumph Daytona 675

1 Answer

If you charge the battery bike starts and runs fine.When battery gets low bike dies. Charging system not working.How do you check voltage regulator?


Unfortunately you cannot check the regulator portion of the regulator/rectifier. The common failure on these units is the stator itself, which is located in the rear of the motor and requires motor removal to replace. If you haven't done so already, check the stator connector (3 pin connector with yellow wires located near the battery). Often these leads develop resistance and get hot and melt the wires in this area. A repair kit is available from Honda with new wires and connectors. However first I would check the stator to be sure it is ok. You can check resistance between each of the yellow wires. The readings should be fairly equal and should have no continuity to ground. If you have continuity to ground, your stator is bad. You can also check AC output between yellow wires with the motor running, you should get voltage readings from about 20VAC at idle that increase to approximately 60-90VAC as the motor is revved up.
Hope this helps.

Aug 21, 2010 | 1984 Honda GL 1200 Aspencade Gold Wing

1 Answer

Honda 2004 Sabre will not charge the battery


Hi, Rhall20448 before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
5. Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
6. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
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Honda shadow vt1100 Owners Workshop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
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1 Answer

Battery went dead & I replaced battery with a new battery, wont hold a charge. Is the stater bad?


If the battery is good, but the bike is not charging, it is either the stator or the regulator/rectifier. If you confirm that the stator is good (resistance and output check) then the regulator/rectifier is the problem.

Jun 15, 2010 | 1997 Honda VF 750 C Magna

1 Answer

I have replaced the battery and it will not hold a charge.the motor sounds like it is not firing right and when it idles the led mileage indicator flashes on and off. after I let it run for a period of...


Three things. The battery, voltage regulator and stator/rotor are all dependent on one another. If the battery is bad it can pull the voltage regulator and stator both down trying to keep it charged. So you need a known good battery to start, then check the output of the regulator with a voltmeter, if that is good, then it will keep the battery charged. If not good check stator output. Somewhere therein lies the problem, as they say.
The engine will misfire and run erratic because it is not getting enough electrical power to run the electronics that control it.
Bottom line, it sounds like the voltage regulator or stator is the problem, which are both easy to check.

May 19, 2010 | 2003 Harley Davidson FXDL Dyna Low Rider

1 Answer

How do i check the charging system?


You can't check the charge system by taking off a cable,you need to use a volt meter.If the tractor is running between 13.5 and 15 volts then you are ok.If the tractor is charging above 15v and needs to be boosted then you need a battery.If the battery never gets above 12.6 v then the alternator or regulator is defective.The only way to know if it is the stator or the regulator is to find the wires that come from the stator and see if they will put out more than 20 volts a.c. at half throttle,if so the stator is good.Next step is to check the regulator to see if at least one wire goes to the battery live[12volts],if so replace the regulator,if not repair the wiring.

May 16, 2010 | Craftsman 17.5 hp 42 in. Deck Lawn Tractor...

1 Answer

Regulator..battery in good condition..not charging when running


Check the stator first. Remove the stator to regulator plug on the left side front of the engine. Test for ground short between the pins and engine case. There should be infinate resistance between pin and ground If there is any continuity, replace the stator. If the resistance test is good, check vor voltage. Start the bike and run up to 2000 RPM. There should be at least 60V AC at across the pins. If either of these tests fail, replace the stator. If these tests are good and it isn't charging, replace the regulator. Good luck.

Apr 15, 2010 | 2004 Harley Davidson FXDX - FXDXI Dyna...

1 Answer

New stator cover bike wont start


useing a multimeter set to d.c check your charge at the battery whith out the motor running it should read above 12 volts determine the voltage stored in the battery with the meter stil conected hit the start button if the meter shows a dramatic drop in voltage its almost certain that the battery is shot howevwer if the voltage does not drop & it wont start bump start it conect the meter still set on dc increase the revs asyou do this the voltage should climb to 13.50 if it does & maintains 13.50 to 13.65 the chargeing system can be declared ok & you only need replace the battery however if it goes above 14 volts the voltage regulator is faulty & cooking the battery so you will need to replace both

Apr 14, 2010 | 1998 kawasaki ZX-6R Ninja

2 Answers

I have a 1980 suzuki 850 gs and its not charging the battery properly what should i do and where is the charging system located on the engine


As suggested, check the voltage with the engine running accross the battery. If its below 14 volts you have an issue with the stator windings/regulator/rectifier/wiring.
Do the cheapest thing first and clean up all electrical connections, esp the earths.
A manual will tell you how to test the charging system, but the Suzuki GS range has always had charging issues.
The simplist method is to fit the combined reg/rectifier unit from a Honda CB250/400 Superdream.
Always keep your engine oil topped to the max mark, as this cools the stator.
Dont leave this, it is not unknown for the entire system to fail including the CDI if left unchecked.

Mar 21, 2010 | 1980 Suzuki GS 750 L

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