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How do I take the seat off to charge the battery?

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Take off the side panels, I believe 2 screws each, then pop off the "buttons" that hold them in. On each side, there's a screw for the seat. Remove them, slide the seat back, and you have access to the battery.

Posted on Aug 24, 2010

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How do i charge battery on yamaha 2008 royal star venture


First, I should explain the difference between most motorcycle batteries and the car batteries that people are more familiar with.

A car battery is usually a "lead-acid" battery, a design largely unchanged, except for the composition of the lead plates, since the turn of the century. The battery is composed of alternating plates of lead and lead dioxide in an acid bath. Adding plates increases the electrical capacity, dividing groups of plates into "cells" increases the voltage available. It's a very basic battery that has worked in stationary and vehicular applications for centuries.

A motorcycle battery is usually an Absorbed Glass Mat (AGM) battery, differing from the car battery in only one respect; the space between the plates is filled by a porous, fiberglass-like material that has been saturated by acid. The advantage of the AGM battery is that it is less susceptible to damage from the increased vibration experienced in a motorcycle or high-performance car.

New motorcycle owners are frequently tempted to use the same battery charger they're accustomed to hooking up to the family sedan, but this can, and usually does, cause premature failure of the battery. Because the motorcycle battery is smaller, it requires less current to charge it, and the excess current generates heat. Because the acid does not circulate between the plates of the battery and distribute the heat and gas generated during charging, the battery heats much more rapidly than the car battery. Heat interferes with the chemical processes the battery performs during the charging cycle, and may cause plates to bend, buckle or crack.

Now, you've probably seen "battery tenders" advertised in motorcycle magazines, at Radio Shack, in Walmart and Sears. This is what you should be using - look for a MAXIMUM charge rate of 2 amperes/hour (it's typically described as "amps"), and a reduced "trickle" charge rate (usually automatic) of 1/4 to 1/2 "amp".

To get to the battery, look under the operator's seat (either side) 1"-2" behind the back of the fuel tank; you'll see a nut holding a threaded shaft into tabs protruding from the frame. Loosen and remove the nuts on both sides, lift the seat up until the threaded shafts are completely free of the tabs, then move the seat straight forward. That will free a catch, molded into the underside of the seat, from a loop in the frame that holds the back of the seat down and keeps the seat from moving side-to-side. The seat may then moved out of the way.

Now you will see the battery in the frame; hook the red lead of the battery tender to the battery terminal with a red insulated boot over it, and hook the black lead of the tender to the opposite battery terminal. The battery tender may be left connected for days, weeks or months at a time, but unless the bike is well protected from the weather, it should probably be disconnected after 16-24 hours and the seat reinstalled.

Reinstallation of the seat is the in reverse order of its' removal (above): there is a specification for the nuts - 5 ft.-lbs. (7 nm) - but it's usually sufficient to tighten the nuts snugly on both sides.

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1 Answer

How do i get the seat off so i can charge the battery?


There should be a keyhole above LH cover, insert ignition key or if saddle style, grab widest seat corner to expose 2 bolts, remove bolts and pull seat out.T install reverse the process. As battery is a MF unit, you need a special battery charger to charge it, if it is old (>3years) better get a new battery. Good?

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1 Answer

How do i charge battery on yamaha 2008 royal star venture


First, I should explain the difference between most motorcycle batteries and the car batteries that people are more familiar with.

A car battery is usually a "lead-acid" battery, a design largely unchanged, except for the composition of the lead plates, since the turn of the century. The battery is composed of alternating plates of lead and lead dioxide in an acid bath. Adding plates increases the electrical capacity, dividing groups of plates into "cells" increases the voltage available. It's a very basic battery that has worked in stationary and vehicular applications for centuries.

A motorcycle battery is usually an Absorbed Glass Mat (AGM) battery, differing from the car battery in only one respect; the space between the plates is filled by a porous, fiberglass-like material that has been saturated by acid. The advantage of the AGM battery is that it is less susceptible to damage from the increased vibration experienced in a motorcycle or high-performance car.

New motorcycle owners are frequently tempted to use the same battery charger they're accustomed to hooking up to the family sedan, but this can, and usually does, cause premature failure of the battery. Because the motorcycle battery is smaller, it requires less current to charge it, and the excess current generates heat. Because the acid does not circulate between the plates of the battery and distribute the heat and gas generated during charging, the battery heats much more rapidly than the car battery. Heat interferes with the chemical processes the battery performs during the charging cycle, and may cause plates to bend, buckle or crack.

Now, you've probably seen "battery tenders" advertised in motorcycle magazines, at Radio Shack, in Walmart and Sears. This is what you should be using - look for a MAXIMUM charge rate of 2 amperes/hour (it's typically described as "amps"), and a reduced "trickle" charge rate (usually automatic) of 1/4 to 1/2 "amp".

To get to the battery, look under the operator's seat (either side) 1"-2" behind the back of the fuel tank; you'll see a nut holding a threaded shaft into tabs protruding from the frame. Loosen and remove the nuts on both sides, lift the seat up until the threaded shafts are completely free of the tabs, then move the seat straight forward. That will free a catch, molded into the underside of the seat, from a loop in the frame that holds the back of the seat down and keeps the seat from moving side-to-side. The seat may then moved out of the way.

Now you will see the battery in the frame; hook the red lead of the battery tender to the battery terminal with a red insulated boot over it, and hook the black lead of the tender to the opposite battery terminal. The battery tender may be left connected for days, weeks or months at a time, but unless the bike is well protected from the weather, it should probably be disconnected after 16-24 hours and the seat reinstalled.

Reinstallation of the seat is the in reverse order of its' removal (above): there is a specification for the nuts - 5 ft.-lbs. (7 nm) - but it's usually sufficient to tighten the nuts snugly on both sides


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3 Answers

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if the batterys are not charged regularly they fail they are gell batterys you are looking at around £70 for the 2 ,they should be on charge almost all the time, we were lucky just managed to charge my father in laws it lay unused for 4 weeks we had the batterys charged with a battery conditioner then they charged with its own charger

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