Question about BMW R 1150 RT (ABS Motorcycles

4 Answers

When I step on the rear brake foot lever the servo sounds but no braking action happens at caliper unless I use front brake lever first. The rear brake caliper won't engage brake using foot lever alone. Fluids are good, Rear Master is good, no apparent leaks, lines bled clear. Warning & ABS lights always flash, blue relay in fuse box has constant click. Electronic hook ups connected and appear good.

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  • Anonymous Mar 22, 2014

    rear brake wont engage

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4 Answers

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  • Master
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If you have abs, then that would be the cause. If fluids are good, nothings is locked up, cable is adjusted properly, and your abs light flashes, that would be the abs systems possibly pump or electrical system.

Posted on Aug 31, 2010

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Are the brake lights coming ON.When you press the brake pedal.If not then get the brake light switch checked.Also check the voltage at the relay which is clicking.Interchange the relay with any other relay and confirm if still there is clicking.The clicking is the indication of relay functioning but if there is constant clicking then there is a short in the connection causing the relay to click constantly.Get it checked. Keep updated.thanks.

Posted on Aug 30, 2010

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  • Master
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As you well know the brake fluids should be changed/flushed yearly drain the entire system of fluid and stop when it runs clear use only DOT 3 normal use and DOT 4 hard riding....below I copied some blogs WARNING!!
NEVER, EVER put pressure on brake discs when changing tires or doing other wheel work! Support the wheel with, perhaps, pieces of 2 x 4 lumber under the tire/rim. Keep the disc(s) OFF the ground! If you do not heed this warning, you MAY warp the disc/carrier. Some folks have old oil drums, one end cut out, set vertically, for use as a fixture when working on disc wheels.
Brake bleeding should be considered a ""NORMAL YEARLY MUST DO"" maintenance item. It is usually easy to do, and hardly has any problems, if you do it right! Failure to annually (or at least every other year at worst case) perform a full system bleeding, in which all of the old discolored fluid is properly bled out of the system and replaced by fresh fluid, will eventually cost you a lot of money, and can cause an accident if bad enough. Once things start to get bad due to neglect, they tend to get worse at an increasing rate. Failure to change the fluid and bleed the brakes may well eventually cause the brakes to bind, seize up, and MIGHT toss you over the handlebars at a very inopportune time (I think ANY time is bad for that!!). See #9 below.
In some instances, you might find your brake pistons jammed; or, partially so. More subtle (and seen more often) is to have them not retract as well as they should, and that can let the pads stay in contact with the discs with too much pressure when they should hardly be touching. There are usually two causes for this. One is the O-ring that is around the piston and seals the fluid from escaping. That O-ring, by deformation (designed to do that), is what is supposed to help retract the pistons ever so slightly, once you release the brake lever pressure. These O-rings have been known to get hard with age....but it is the corrosion in their groove that is the primary problem. Water eventually accumulates from absorption, to the extent that the fluid contains a fair percentage of moisture, and with the corrosion, the O-ring and piston will have sticky problems. Another problem with old fluid...or just accumulated carbon and rubber residue... is that they can plug up the small return hole in the master cylinder, thus the caliper part of the system will retain pressure, and the pistons will not retract fully. See #9 below.

Longevity of HOSES:
Although this particular problem used to be very rare, it is not all that rare nowadays. The BMW stock hoses are VERY good and LAST for quite a few DECADES; ....IF....... you do not hang them by the calipers. That BAD practice CAN excessively bend the hoses INTERNALLY at the fittings. Internal hidden damage is possible. The small diameter internal stiff plastic tube (yep, the thick rubber hose covers that internal tube) kinks, and produces a partial one-way flap. There is a LOT of pressure from the master cylinder when using hand or foot pressure. That pressure needs to relieve itself when the lever is released...by a relatively small amount of fluid coming back to the master cylinder. AFTER the major part of that pressure is relieved (one hopes, by releasing the lever), the final bit of pressure relief effect is from the caliper piston's O-ring deformation, now pushing the piston back a really tiny amount. If a flap or kink develops in the inner tube of the hose, the system might not relieve pressure partially or completely. Even a partial non-release will cause problems, the least of which is, after awhile, a change in surface of the pads, and thereby some squealing and possibly poor pad friction. The worst situation would probably be enough heat from enough pad friction to allow the possibility of brake fluid boiling (especially if the fluid is old!), causing bubbles, causing NO BRAKES!!!

Stainless Steel braided lines are NOT generally any better overall and potentially FAR WORSE, and I recommend you do not willy-nilly replace stock hoses, no matter what type. There are exceptions, but that is a good general rule. I discuss SS hoses in more depth later in this article.
Brake fluids:
Use ONLY DOT3 or the slightly better DOT4. Keep it OFF the paintwork, and keep a VERY WET RAG on your paintwork when working with it. If, HORRORS!.. it gets on the paintwork, wash it off with water, INSTANTLY...that means RIGHT NOW! You do NOT have 10 seconds! ALWAYS have a WET RAG instantly available when using brake fluid!

Don't use "race" fluids...they require changing once or twice EVERY year without fail, and offer NO advantages to a street bike. There are so-called 'premium' DOT4 fluids; some are called RACE fluids; and there is also, confusingly, a DOT 5.1 that is NOT silicone based and hence is usable...but WHY?
I recommend inexpensive DOT3 for most folks who want the cheapest, and who do change fluids EVERY year and are not overly hard on brakes, with DOT4 for those who are hard on the brakes, getting them VERY hot. It IS BEST to change brake fluid yearly. I personally do it as part of my pre-Winter service. For longest brake system life, your brake fluid really needs yearly changing, as it attracts moisture, right through the non-leaking lines, molecular sized holes in everything....especially the master cylinder bolt and screw fastenings, etc. Bleed the brakes until clear fluid comes out. Best to use a fresh 8 ounce can each time; but not as much of a must as some say...just don't leave the cap off for appreciable amount of time.
If you regularly change fluid by the full bleeding method, until fluid is nice and clear, then you are UNlikely to EVER have to replace the master cylinder or calipers or brake hoses. If you DO open a system, for such as rebuilding a caliper, or changing a hose, use only brake fluid or specific brake cleaner, for cleaning parts. For very serious caliper overhauls, etc., you COULD use other solvents, heck, even detergent and water...but after drying, any reassembly means using brake fluid for lubrication of parts during assembly, ETC.
In MY opinion, the absolute limit for brake fluid changing for a bike with very MINimal use, is 18 months. Those who ride in a lot of humid weather, or who ride a lot; if the bike is parked in the sunlight, etc., might even consider 6 month fluid changes. Fluid is VERY cheap compared to new parts
on this matter....hope it helps you decide.

Posted on Aug 23, 2010

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  • Expert
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Hi! May you please check on the vacuum hoses. If you have a vacuum leak or worn hoses the brake sometimes fail so checking the vacuum lines can be a good place to start. Hope this helps and thank you for using FixYa!

Posted on Aug 23, 2010

  • dj_relly999
    dj_relly999 Aug 30, 2010

    If vacuum lines are good then you may want to try checking on the brake piston kit. The rubber seal on the piston may be a little worn which can cause a delay on delivering the brake.

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  1. Remove retaining clip from the parking brake rear cable at the disc brake caliper. Release the tension from the parking brake cable and disengage the cable end from the parking brake lever on the brake caliper.

And this is the step that says how to INSTALL the cable:

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How do i change a mazda xedos 6 front brake pads?


Hi,
Brake Pads are an important part of your Mazda6's braking system. They are the replaceable friction pads that pinch the brake disc or drum when the brakes are applied. You should replace the brake pads before they wear beyond a quarter inch or risk damaging your Mazda6's brake discs.

Instructions
Remove the old Brake Pads
  1. Step 1 Park your car on a level surface. If you have a stick shift car, make sure the car is in gear. Do not set the parking brake. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.
  2. Step 2 Open the hood of your car. Locate the master cylinder and brake fluid container. If necessary, remove brake fluid until the level in the container is less than half full. A turkey baster is a good tool for this. Put the brake fluid in the plastic container and dispose of it the way you dispose of motor oil.
  3. Step 3 Raise the rear end of your car with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.
  4. Step 4 Disconnect the parking brake cable from the brake caliper. The cable is usually held in place with a retaining clip. You can use pliers to remove the clip and disconnect the cable.
  5. Step 5 Remove the upper caliper bolt. Rotate the caliper downward until you can comfortably work on it. Remove the springs, pads and shims from the caliper.

    Install the new Brake Pads
  6. Step 1 Use the recommended tool to press the caliper piston back into the piston assembly.
  7. Step 2 Insert the shims, springs and new pads into the caliper. Reconnect the parking brake cable.
  8. Step 3 Rotate the caliper upward and back into place. Use the socket wrench to tighten the upper mounting bolt to 27 to 36 foot lb. (37 to 49 Nm) if you have a Mazda6 or to 16 to 23 foot lb. (21 to 31 Nm) if you have a Mazdaspeed6.
  9. Step 4 Replace the tire wheel assembly. Lower the car to the ground.
  10. Step 5 Add fluid to the master cylinder container to replace any you removed before you removed the old brake pads.
  11. Step 6 Season the brake pads by making only gentle stops when you are driving for the first week after you install the new brake pads. Try not to do any hard stopping when you are seasoning the brakes.
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Replace rear brake pads


Rear disc brake pads offer better performance and are not as affected by moisture like conventional brake shoe style brakes are. Rear disc brakes are similar to front disc brakes. The main difference is that rear disc brake systems must incorporate the emergency brake system. There are two methods widely used for the emergency brake with rear disc systems. The first system is a brake shoe inside the brake disc that is actuated by the emergency brake lever. The second is a screw style actuator inside the brake caliper. When activated the brake pads are forced into the brake disc and held tightly by the emergency brake lever.
READ COMPLETELY BEFORE STARTING
Step 1 - Identify Rear Disc Brake Components
rear_brake_pads.jpg Rear disc brake assembly includes; rear brake disc, rear brake pads, brake caliper mount and a caliper mounting screw. (Note: Some vehicles do not have the rotor mounting screw.)
Step 2 - Removing the Rear Brake Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_2.jpg To replace rear brake pads and rotors the rear brake caliper needs to be removed. First loosen the rear brake caliper mount bolts and remove them. Turn counter clockwise.
Step 3 - Lift Rear Brake Caliper from The Caliper Mount
rear_brake_pads_3.jpg After the caliper mount bolts have been removed, gently lift the brake caliper from the caliper mount. Inspect the caliper slides; they should move freely in the caliper mount. Remove rear brake pads and hardware.

Step 4 - Removing Caliper Mount Bolts
rear_brake_pads_4.jpg With a socket wrench or other appropriate removal tool, loosen the rear brake caliper mounting bolts. Remove bolts and lift the caliper mount and remove it from the vehicle. Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole. Tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub holding on tightly, using both hands. You do not want to drop the rotor.

Step 5 - Removing Rear Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor.jpg Remove the retaining screw from the disc mounting hole, tap the rotor gently to release any rust that has accumulated between the rotor and bearing hub. Lift brake rotor from wheel hub, hold on using both hands and do not drop.

Step 6 - Install New Brake Rotor
rear_brake_rotor_2.jpg Check the new rotor against the old brake rotor to make sure they are the same size. Clean the mating surface on the wheel hub before the new brake rotor is installed. Reinstall rotor retainer screw.
Step 7 - Reset Rear Brake Caliper
rear_brakes_7.jpg Before new brake pads can be installed, the rear brake caliper must be reset. The reset tool winds the piston back into position so the new brake pads will fit. This style of brake caliper will not compress with a clamp tool; it can only be reset with the proper reset tool.
Step 8 - Reinstall Rear Caliper Mount and Install New Rear Brake Pads
rear_brake_rotor_3.jpg After the caliper has been reset, reinstall caliper mounting bolts and make sure the bolts are tight. Then match up the old brake pads to the new brake pads. They should be exactly the same except, of course; the old ones will be worn out. Check the new brake pads for proper fit and install any brake hardware that is required.
Step 9 - Remount Rear Brake Caliper
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1986 Fiero: my e brake on my 85 fiero is stuck and i need it t...


It probably got stuck from lack of use/lubrication. But if your lever is also stuck up it could be a function of the actual lever action. I'm assuming you tried pushing the button in to release the lever?

Step 1) Get a haynes manual if you own a fiero, VERY valuable tool

Step 2) Check the physical action of the lever, is the lever not releasing down because of the lever itself? --> frozen/rusted? something physically blocking it on the floor of the car? Or is it not releasing due to the cable tension?

It's been awhile since I looked at it, but there should be a way to take the cover off of the lever to see the cable come into the shaft from underneath the car. Follow this cable to the rear of the car where it goes to the driver side rear brake caliper, then across the car to the passenger side caliper. You can adjust the tension for the cable using the nuts on the cable.


Also, there is a spring on each caliper that is supposed to put tension on the cable when pulled, so when released the cable returns to driving position and thus releases the brakes. Are these springs missing?

Are the brakes engaged because of the e-brake being stuck?

If you are in a pinch and need to use your car and can't because the brakes are on due to a stuck e-brake, it's not smart and can be illegal in your state, but you could just cut the e-brake cable. Should be pretty easy to do where it meets the lever on the inside of the car.


Let me know if you need more help

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How to install brake pads for mazda 6


Hi,

Brake Pads are an important part of your Mazda6's braking system. They are the replaceable friction pads that pinch the brake disc or drum when the brakes are applied. You should replace the brake pads before they wear beyond a quarter inch or risk damaging your Mazda6's brake discs.

Instructions

    Remove the old Brake Pads
  1. Step 1 Park your car on a level surface. If you have a stick shift car, make sure the car is in gear. Do not set the parking brake. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.
  2. Step 2 Open the hood of your car. Locate the master cylinder and brake fluid container. If necessary, remove brake fluid until the level in the container is less than half full. A turkey baster is a good tool for this. Put the brake fluid in the plastic container and dispose of it the way you dispose of motor oil.
  3. Step 3 Raise the rear end of your car with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.
  4. Step 4 Disconnect the parking brake cable from the brake caliper. The cable is usually held in place with a retaining clip. You can use pliers to remove the clip and disconnect the cable.
  5. Step 5 Remove the upper caliper bolt. Rotate the caliper downward until you can comfortably work on it. Remove the springs, pads and shims from the caliper.
  6. Install the new Brake Pads
  7. Step 1 Use the recommended tool to press the caliper piston back into the piston assembly.
  8. Step 2 Insert the shims, springs and new pads into the caliper. Reconnect the parking brake cable.
  9. Step 3 Rotate the caliper upward and back into place. Use the socket wrench to tighten the upper mounting bolt to 27 to 36 foot lb. (37 to 49 Nm) if you have a Mazda6 or to 16 to 23 foot lb. (21 to 31 Nm) if you have a Mazdaspeed6.
  10. Step 4 Replace the tire wheel assembly. Lower the car to the ground.
  11. Step 5 Add fluid to the master cylinder container to replace any you removed before you removed the old brake pads.
  12. Step 6 Season the brake pads by making only gentle stops when you are driving for the first week after you install the new brake pads. Try not to do any hard stopping when you are seasoning the brakes.
Hope i helped you.

Thanks for using ' Fixya ' and have a nice day!!

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