Question about 2008 KTM RC8

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I have a problem with my charging system on my ktm rc8 it looks like the battery is not being charged i have put a multimeter across the battery when running and it only shows 12.3 v i would expext about 13.9 ish

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

ollie reece
  • 1167 Answers

SOURCE: KTM EXC 250F - Battery now holding its charge

is the battery charging by engine

Posted on Oct 08, 2009

KTMEXC250
  • 31 Answers

SOURCE: Hi I just bought a KTM RC8, it was involved in a

Try looking at all your fuel lines first, Then take the plug/plugs out and check them thoroughly for cracks. If you know how to use a multimeter check the resistance between the body and head of the plug/plugs. replace the leads to the plug and earth the plug to the chassis and roll it in 3rd gear and check for a spark. Remember not to the plug at all whilst turning the engine over in any way. This is extremely dangerous but will tell you whether the issue is in the engine or it is an ignition problem. check all your ignition cables for continuity or breaks in other words. Try pulling the plug/plugs out and putting a little fuel on them then

Posted on Nov 02, 2009

TerryTown
  • 292 Answers

SOURCE: Electric start not working. Bought

Thank you for contacting FixYa with your inquiry.
Thank you for contacting FixYa with your inquiry.
This is not an uncommon behavior and we need to locate the source of the problem and eliminate the things that are not effecting the issue.
Most probable causes: Battery, Starter Relay, Start Button, Starter.
Manually start the bike and take it for a good rip and see if the battery takes/holds a good charge for the rest of the day. If you don't have trouble starting through out the day then it's a good chance you may need to replace the battery. Recommend the use of a trickle charger to keep the charge up during the week when bikes in the garage. Part# 53 Frame Parts/Wiring Harness.http://cyclehuttktm.com/FicheFinderNew/FicheFinder.aspx
If your battery is known to be new or has a good charge, do you often hear a clicking sound. It might indicate your starter relay is wearing out or you have a short. Trace the wire harness and confirm insulation wear.Check starter wire and confirm the nut's tight with a good star washer. If relay - replace it. Part Number #58 Frame/Wiring Harness http://cyclehuttktm.com/FicheFinderNew/FicheFinder.aspx
If the battery is known good and the relay pulls in but the starter won't engage and you can hear it attempting you may have an issue with the starter being in a bind from some internal obstruction or just plain worn out. Pull it and check it. See if it engages off the frame. You may have to take it to an alternator shop and have it re-wound. New ones are spendy.http://cyclehuttktm.com/FicheFinderNew/FicheFinder.aspx
Starter Control Button: Reseat the connection and confirm it's engaging the relay. Part Number #69 chassis/Handlebar Controls. http://cyclehuttktm.com/FicheFinderNew/FicheFinder.aspx
Hope this helps you resolve your starting issue. If we can provide further assistance please advise,
Best regards,
TF

Posted on Jul 17, 2011

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What could be wrong when charging system doesn't work?


Hi, Dwayne the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website
1.Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & rotor If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
How to Test Your Motorcycle Charging System
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
How to Test Motorcycle Charging System

Jan 20, 2017 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

2005 vl 1500 charging system system not charging checked generator 3 wires giving pluss 80v at 5000rpm instaled new rectifier voltage across battery under 13 volts could faulty battery be problem


Hi, Anonymous the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://www.crowitis.com/images/VL1500_Charging_System_Wiring_Upgrades.pdf
stator output voltage
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
Suzuki VL1500 Service Manual
OEM parts for Suzuki
Suzuki VZ1500 Owner Manual

Jan 16, 2017 | Motorcycles

2 Answers

My car will not stay charged. does the 1998 mecury grand marquis 4.6 have a 175 amp mega fuse. is so, where is it located.


Some possibilities, battery--battery connections--generator--generator wiring-- too much parasitic drain with everything off.

Here is charging system diagram. I didn't look for mega fuse, I will if you want it. In the diagram, you can see applicable fuses and fusible links.
If battery is down get it charged up, can't do any testing if battery is down. With a charged battery, everything thing off, use digital multimeter across battery posts, the generic spec for a full charge is around 12.6 volts. Then start vehicle, take second reading across battery posts, the second reading should be higher than the first if charging system is working.
26312730-dtx0paaksp2dudcj4ee0acfc-2-0.jpg

26312730-dtx0paaksp2dudcj4ee0acfc-2-2.jpg

Oct 15, 2016 | 1998 Mercury Grand Marquis

1 Answer

Ktm rc8 problems


separate all the keys (if all bunched together) so u have one in hand and others away from bike, make sure batery has good voltage may have to charge,then try the single key again, sometimes it gets confused with the other transponder keys hope this works 4 u

Feb 18, 2014 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

1997 Honda Shadow Spirit VT1100 not charging


Hi, Cornelius before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
5. Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
6. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
VT1100 Charging Problem
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
Honda shadow vt1100 Owners Workshop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda VT1100C2 Owner Manual Page 3

Jan 15, 2012 | 1997 Honda VT 1100 C2 Shadow Sabre

2 Answers

Battery loosing charge.


check your alternator/stator plate is putting current to the battery my guess is its goosed / multimeter across batery terminals should read 14.2 volts when engine is running if not its stator plate /check all terminals 1st with wd40 then chack again if it still persist then its ur stator burnt a coil

Mar 27, 2017 | 1994 Triumph Trophy 900

1 Answer

Hi I just bought a KTM RC8, it was involved in a crash and can?t get to start the motor? If anyone could suggest something that might help I would really appreciate it. Cheers Mustafa


Try looking at all your fuel lines first, Then take the plug/plugs out and check them thoroughly for cracks. If you know how to use a multimeter check the resistance between the body and head of the plug/plugs. replace the leads to the plug and earth the plug to the chassis and roll it in 3rd gear and check for a spark. Remember not to the plug at all whilst turning the engine over in any way. This is extremely dangerous but will tell you whether the issue is in the engine or it is an ignition problem. check all your ignition cables for continuity or breaks in other words. Try pulling the plug/plugs out and putting a little fuel on them then

Sep 30, 2009 | 2008 KTM RC8

1 Answer

My ktm duke had a low battery i fitted a new one and the ignition worked fine but now it dose nothing but bike kick starts


Check your stator and voltage regulator for proper output. Sounds like the battery isn't receiving a charge through the system. You can charge the battery with a trickle charger to verify the battery will take a charge outside the bikes charging system.

Sep 18, 2009 | 2001 KTM 640 Duke 2

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