Question about 2005 Harley Davidson XL 1200 C Sportster Custom

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Recurring code po373,crank sensor intermittent.replaced sensor,checked wires,new sensor puts out .8 volts a/c.while cranking

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Did u get it scanned at a shop-never replace parts till u know the solution--chec for any vacuum leaks they dont show on readouts--how is batt-at constant 12v-r cables tite

Posted on Aug 23, 2010

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3 Answers

Code p1391, ckp or cmp sensor intermittent


Its the crank and or the cam sensor , But the the CAM sensor should fix this.. But check and be sure wiring to sensor is ok. God-Bless!

Apr 02, 2016 | 2000 Dodge Intrepid

2 Answers

P1391 dodge ram


http://dodgeforum.com/forum/2nd-gen-ram-tech/112989-the-infamous-p1391.html go to this web page. it has a discussion on this trouble code.

Apr 20, 2014 | 2002 Dodge Ram Pickup 1500

1 Answer

I have a 2006 chrysler 300 2.7 engine it did not start up change spark plugs


The diagnostic procedure for EI (electronic ignition) systems varies depending on the vehicle make and model year. Always follow the procedure recommended in the vehicle manufacturer's service manual.
The following procedure is based on Chrysler EI systems. The crankshaft timing sensor and camshaft reference sensor in these systems are modified Hall-effect switches.
If a crank or cam sensor fails, the engine will not start. both of these sensor circuits can be checked with a voltmeter or lab scope.
If the sensors are receiving the correct amount of voltage and have good low-resistance ground circuits, their output should be a pulsing digital signal or voltmeter reading while the engine is cranking.
If any of these conditions do not exist, the circuit needs to be repaired or the sensor needs to be replaced. When the engine fails to start, follow these steps:
  1. Check for fault codes 11 and 43.
    • Code 11, "Ignition Reference Signal," could be caused by a defective camshaft reference signal or crankshaft timing sensor signal.
    • Code 43 is caused by low primary current in coil number 1, 2 or 3.
  2. With the engine cranking, check the voltage from the orange wire to ground on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor. fr_24.13.gif Crankshaft timing and camshaft reference sensor terminals.
    • Over 7V is satisfactory.
    • If the voltage is less than specified, repeat the test with the voltmeter connected from PCM (powertrain control module) terminal 7 to ground.
    • If the voltage is satisfactory at terminal 7 but low at the sensor orange wire, repair the open circuit or high resistance in the orange wire.
    • If the voltage is low at terminal 7, the PCM may need replacement.
      • Be sure 12V are supplied to the PCM terminal 3 with the ignition switch off or on, and 12 V must be supplied to PCM terminal 9 with the ignition switch on.
      • Check PCM ground connections on terminals 11 and 12 before PCM replacement.
  3. With the ignition switch on, check the voltage drop across the ground circuit (black/light blue wire) on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor.
    • A reading below 0.2V is satisfactory.
NOTE When using a digital voltmeter to check a crankshaft or camshaft sensor signal, crank the engine a very small amount at a time and observe the voltmeter. The voltmeter reading should cycle from almost 0 volts to a highter voltage of about 5 volts. Since digital voltmeters do not react instantly, it is difficult to see the change in voltmeter reading if the engine is cranked continually.
  1. If the readings in the previous two steps are satisfactory, connect a lab scope or digital voltmeter from the gray/black wire on the crankshaft timing sensor and the tan/yellow wire on the camshaft reference sensor to ground. fr_24.14.gif Lab scope patterns from the camshaft and crankshaft position sensors.
    • When the engine is cranking, a digital pattern should be displayed or the voltmeter should cycle between 0 and 5 volts.
    • If the voltage does not cycle, sensor replacement is required.
    • Each sensor voltage signal should cycle from low voltage to high voltage as the engine is cranked.
A no-start condition can occur if the PCM "locks up."
  • In step 2 above, if 0 volts is indicated the PCM may be faulty or it may be locked up.
  • If the PCM is locked up it will not store a fault code for the reason.
  • Basically, the PCM will lock up when it goes into a safeguard routine if the 9-volt or 5-volt reference voltage shorts to ground. This shuts down the PCM to protect it. Since it shuts down, no DTCs (Diagnostic trouble code) are stored.
  • The engine will not start as long as the ground is present. An intermittent ground will cause the engine to stop running.
  • Attempting to restart the engine without cycling the ignition switch to the full LOCK position will not start the engine, even if the ground is lifted.
    • Cycle the ignition switch to the LOCK position and wait about 5 to 10 seconds.
    • If the ground is lifted, the PCM will reset and the engine will start and run until the ground occurs again.
  • On 1996 and new SBEC III and JTEC engine controllers, there are two 5-volt reference signals. The sensors that require 5 volts are separated, thus If this signal shorts to ground the engine will still stop running, but for the first time a DTC can be set.
  • Also note, if the 9-volt reference voltage is opened, there will be no DTC stored for the crankshaft or camshaft positions sensors. With an open circuit the PCM cannot tell if the engine is cranking or not. The diagnostic routing does not begin until the PCM senses engine cranking.
For a car to start you need compression spark and fuel. If you put a rag over the schrader valve (looks like a bike tire air valve) on the metal fuel rail and push the center down with a screw driver gas should shoot out if it doesn't you have a fuel problem.They make a spark tester that goes in line between the plug and wire see if you have spark when it cranks. Look up on line for a picture of the crank sensor at auto parts web site and look for sensor front of engine just above oil pan

Nov 29, 2011 | Chrysler Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2005 nissan altima codes p0725, po335. how to fix


P0335 Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Malfunction P0725 Engine Speed input Circuit Malfunction
  1. Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
  2. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manualmag-glass_10x10.gif. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
  3. If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
  4. If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

Sep 10, 2011 | 2004 Nissan Altima

1 Answer

2005 nissan altima p335, p725 im doing some old fasioned searching on thies codes im getting on my car. It seams one code leads to the other but i havent determined which problem code comes first or if my...


  1. Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.
  2. If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manualmag-glass_10x10.gif. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?
  3. If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?
  4. If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault. this is all for the P0335 code, the others will pretty much reset themselves

Sep 05, 2011 | 2004 Nissan Altima

1 Answer

PO727, PO335, PO700


this is an obd2 trouble code table, you can understand the meaning of code.
for p0335, you can try:
Using a scan tool, check if, when engine is running or cranking, that there is an RPM signal.

If there is no RPM reading, then visually inspect the crank sensor and connector for any damage and repair as necessary. If there is no visible damage, and you have access to a scope, you could check the CKP 5 Volt square wave pattern. If you do not, then, obtain a resistance reading of your crank sensor from a repair manual. (There are so many different types of crank sensors that there's no way to put here which resistance reading is correct). Then check the resistance of the CKP sensor by disconnecting the sensor and measuring resistance of the sensor. (It is best to check resistance readings from the PCM connector. This rules out any wiring problems from the start. But it does require some mechanical skill and shouldn't be performed if you\'re not familiar with automobile electrical systems). Is the sensor within resistance specs?

If not, replace the CKP sensor. If so, recheck resistance reading from the PCM connector. Is the reading still okay?

If not, repair open or short in the wiring to the crank sensor and re-check. If the reading is okay, the problem is intermittent or the PCM may be at fault. Try reconnecting and checking for RPM signal again. If there is now an RPM signal, wiggle test the wiring harness to try and induce the fault.

for

Aug 04, 2011 | 2005 Chevrolet Equinox

2 Answers

I have a 02 dodge grand caravan sport with 0351,0352,0700 codes...car runs good then shakes and even stalls at times,but not all the time...i have replaced ignition coil,wires,plugs,and catalytic...


po700 code just means you have codes
P0351-IGNITION COIL #1 PRIMARY CIRCUIT

WHEN MONITORED
With battery voltage greater than 8 volts during engine cranking or greater than 13 volts with engine running. Engine RPM less than 3000. No coil in dwell during test.

SET CONDITION
Peak current is not achieved with battery based dwell plus 1.5 msec of diagnostic offset. It takes less than 3 seconds during cranking or up to 6 seconds while running to set.

POSSIBLE CAUSES
- Ignition coil
- Intermittent condition
- ASD relay output circuit
- Ignition coil driver circuit open
- Ignition coil driver circuit shorted to ground
- PCM

P0352-IGNITION COIL #2 PRIMARY CIRCUIT

TEST NOTE
This symptom is diagnosed using the test P0351-IGNITION COIL #1 PRIMARY CIRCUIT.

WHEN MONITORED
With battery voltage greater than 8 volts during engine cranking or greater than 13 volts with engine running. Engine RPM less than 3000. No coil in dwell during test.

SET CONDITION
Peak current is not achieved with battery based dwell plus 1.5 msec of diagnostic offset. It takes less than 3 seconds during cranking or up to 6 seconds while running to set.

POSSIBLE CAUSES
- Ignition coil
- Intermittent condition
- ASD relay output circuit
- Ignition coil driver circuit open
- Ignition coil driver circuit shorted to ground
- PCM
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var classElements = new Array(); var node = document; var tag = 'a'; var els = node.getElementsByTagName(tag); var elsLen = els.length; var pattern = new RegExp("(^'\\s)specs_note(\\s'$)"); for (i = 0, j = 0; i

Jun 14, 2011 | 2002 Dodge Grand Caravan

1 Answer

I am trying to test the crank sensor on my 99 intrepid and need to know how to test


No-Start Diagnosis
The diagnostic procedure for EI (electronic ignition) systems varies depending on the vehicle make and model year. Always follow the procedure recommended in the vehicle manufacturer's service manual.
The following procedure is based on Chrysler EI systems. The crankshaft timing sensor and camshaft reference sensor in these systems are modified Hall-effect switches.
If a crank or cam sensor fails, the engine will not start. both of these sensor circuits can be checked with a voltmeter or lab scope.
If the sensors are receiving the correct amount of voltage and have good low-resistance ground circuits, their output should be a pulsing digital signal or voltmeter reading while the engine is cranking.
If any of these conditions do not exist, the circuit needs to be repaired or the sensor needs to be replaced. When the engine fails to start, follow these steps:
  1. Check for fault codes 11 and 43.
    • Code 11, "Ignition Reference Signal," could be caused by a defective camshaft reference signal or crankshaft timing sensor signal.
    • Code 43 is caused by low primary current in coil number 1, 2 or 3.
  2. With the engine cranking, check the voltage from the orange wire to ground on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor. fr_24.13.gif Crankshaft timing and camshaft reference sensor terminals.
    • Over 7V is satisfactory.
    • If the voltage is less than specified, repeat the test with the voltmeter connected from PCM (powertrain control module) terminal 7 to ground.
    • If the voltage is satisfactory at terminal 7 but low at the sensor orange wire, repair the open circuit or high resistance in the orange wire.
    • If the voltage is low at terminal 7, the PCM may need replacement.
      • Be sure 12V are supplied to the PCM terminal 3 with the ignition switch off or on, and 12 V must be supplied to PCM terminal 9 with the ignition switch on.
      • Check PCM ground connections on terminals 11 and 12 before PCM replacement.
  3. With the ignition switch on, check the voltage drop across the ground circuit (black/light blue wire) on the crankshaft timing sensor and the camshaft reference sensor.
    • A reading below 0.2V is satisfactory.
NOTE When using a digital voltmeter to check a crankshaft or camshaft sensor signal, crank the engine a very small amount at a time and observe the voltmeter. The voltmeter reading should cycle from almost 0 volts to a highter voltage of about 5 volts. Since digital voltmeters do not react instantly, it is difficult to see the change in voltmeter reading if the engine is cranked continually.
  1. If the readings in the previous two steps are satisfactory, connect a lab scope or digital voltmeter from the gray/black wire on the crankshaft timing sensor and the tan/yellow wire on the camshaft reference sensor to ground. fr_24.14.gif Lab scope patterns from the camshaft and crankshaft position sensors.
    • When the engine is cranking, a digital pattern should be displayed or the voltmeter should cycle between 0 and 5 volts.
    • If the voltage does not cycle, sensor replacement is required.
    • Each sensor voltage signal should cycle from low voltage to high voltage as the engine is cranked.
A no-start condition can occur if the PCM "locks up."
  • In step 2 above, if 0 volts is indicated the PCM may be faulty or it may be locked up.
  • If the PCM is locked up it will not store a fault code for the reason.
  • Basically, the PCM will lock up when it goes into a safeguard routine if the 9-volt or 5-volt reference voltage shorts to ground. This shuts down the PCM to protect it. Since it shuts down, no DTCs (Diagnostic trouble code) are stored.
  • The engine will not start as long as the ground is present. An intermittent ground will cause the engine to stop running.
  • Attempting to restart the engine without cycling the ignition switch to the full LOCK position will not start the engine, even if the ground is lifted.
    • Cycle the ignition switch to the LOCK position and wait about 5 to 10 seconds.
    • If the ground is lifted, the PCM will reset and the engine will start and run until the ground occurs again.
  • On 1996 and new SBEC III and JTEC engine controllers, there are two 5-volt reference signals. The sensors that require 5 volts are separated, thus If this signal shorts to ground the engine will still stop running, but for the first time a DTC can be set.
  • Also note, if the 9-volt reference voltage is opened, there will be no DTC stored for the crankshaft or camshaft positions sensors. With an open circuit the PCM cannot tell if the engine is cranking or not. The diagnostic routing does not begin until the PCM senses engine cranking.

Nov 10, 2009 | 1999 Dodge Intrepid

1 Answer

Camshaft Position Sensor code is recurring.


if you noticed hows theres not much slack in the pigtail connector to the cam sensor the wires can break at the bend. replacing the pigtail should fix it

May 25, 2009 | 2004 Dodge Neon

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