Question about Suzuki SV 1000 S Motorcycles

2 Answers

Charging problem. All individual components check out ok; Generator: All phases 0.3 ohms, all phases 85 volts open circuit at 5000 rpm, all phases threaten to destroy two headlamp bulbs wire in series at 2000 rpm, so presumably each phase turning out at least 120 watts or so. Reg / rec. Tried two second hand replacements and a brand new pattern one. All control at 13 volts max at the battery; not enough to maintain battery charge after a few days. Wiring. I've by-passed the wiring from the reg / rec to the battery with heavy duty cable. No difference. Battery; replaced with new Lucas unit. No difference. I was a bike mechanic and a car auto-electrician, so generally have some idea of what I'm doing, but can't make sense of this one. Any ideas, please? Al

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  • algoffen Aug 08, 2010

    Forgot to mention that I've also by-passed the earth from the reg / rec to the battery. All leads show zero resistance static, and zero voltage drop dynamic [i.e. with engine running].

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  • Master
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What year is this?
I did find a link to a service manual for a 2003 if that helps any:
http://www.edubs.net/bikestuff/sv1000/

There have actually been alot of complaints about a green wire frying out or melting together. Same with ignition wiring. There should be a 30 amp fuse in the wiring, possibly to the rectifier.

Here are some wiring diagrams if you need them:

http://www.cmsnl.com/suzuki-sv1000-s-usa_model16250/partslist/434337.html

Posted on Aug 08, 2010

  • algoffen Aug 09, 2010

    Thanks for the come-back.

    There's no green wire in the charging system. I think the one that you refer to takes power to the headlamps and dash. As there's no untoward leakage [a couple of milli-amps with power off, and uses 21 amps when running with headlamps on, which is about right] I don't think we're looking at a heavy leak to earth. It would have to be well heavy to drop the charging voltage to 13.5 volts from the ideal 14.7. In the realms of smoke and flames!

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  • Suzuki Master
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Since the generator is good, the rectifier/regulator is good (and well installed - especially the grounding bolts, no corrosion there) and you still don't get the voltage then the only thing left is a short in the wiring between the rec/reg and the battery.Check the resistance of every wire to the ground with all stuff disconnected.

Posted on Aug 07, 2010

  • Azrael SRL Aug 08, 2010

    It must be a wiring problem, nothing else is defective. Have you tested the connectors themselves? They are notoriously weak.


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Why is battery not charging while running, and rev counter showing zero while in motion?


Hi Heather, in order to check out any main system electrical circuit, you have to start with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better, and be able to pass a load test if necessary.
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with ohm meter if necessary.
2. Check the voltage drop at the battery when you hit the starter button, anything below 9 volts you might have a faulty battery.
3. Check voltage at the battery with the bike running at 3,600 RPM should be 14.3 to 14.7 volts. If you are not getting these numbers you might have a faulty voltage regulator.
4. Make sure voltage regulator is grounded and functioning properly, watch video below on how to test a voltage regulator.
5. Unplug the connector to the alternator and hook your multimeter leads to the alternator (pin/socket selection does not matter) set the multimeter to AC volts, at an idle the meter should read 16 to 20 volts AC. at 2,000 RPM 32 to 40 AC volts, 3,000 RPM 48 to 60 AC volts. If you are not getting these numbers you may have a faulty rotor, follow step 6
6. Set the multimeter to OHM'S, connect one lead to the alternator (any pin/socket) and the other to ground, meter should read infinity. Connect both leads to the alternator meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 OHM'S. If you are not getting these numbers you have a bad stator.
7. Check all wiring in the charging circuit for worn or chaffed spots and all wiring connectors in the circuit for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets, which is the # 1 offender.
For more information about your issue please visit the websites below. Good luck and have nice day.
https://www.tradebit.com/filesharing.php/search/0/yamaha+fz+600

Sep 09, 2015 | Yamaha FZ 600 Motorcycles

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How a "Heater" or anything that has a "Load" works, & How to troubleshoot.


A Heater, is a real simple circuit. There are only TWO "Active" wires in any Electrical Circuit, the Phase, Positive, & Neutral, Negative, usually Negative & We also have an Earth, the Earth & Neutral are at the same, "Potential", IE:0 Volts. So imagine it like this, from the left we have a a Power wire, the Phase, this Wire, goes to One terminal on the On/Off Switch, this is called the "Hot" side, of this switch, This switch, when operated, "Breaks" the Phase line, or circuit, From the other terminal,the "Cold" side of the Power Switch, That wire, circuit, then goes from that "Cold" side of that switch, usually, to a "Thermal Fuse", wired in "Series" this "Fuse" is "Normally Closed", when/if, there is an "Overheating Condition", this "Device" will go "Open Circuit". Thus Breaking, the Phase Power, OFF, from the "Element", or "Load". Connection. This wire then goes, from the other terminal of that "Fuse" to the "Hot" side of the "Element". Now the other side or "Cold" side of the "Element" or "Load" then goes to "Neutral", or, return. Thus the circuit is now complete. Now the Earth, the MOST important wire, is bonded to the/any metal case &/or fittings of the unit, thus any "Hot" wire that may break, or touch, the "Earth" will cause a "Short Circuit" to Earth,and "Blow" the Circuit Breaker or Fuse on the Main Power Board. Thus affording protection from shock. Troubleshooting is simply following continuity along the circuit path, and the measuring of the On/Off components for integrity, and the/any "Fuses" and the "Resistance" of the Elements. This can be worked out from OHMS LAW, Volts = Amps multiplied by Resistance. Watts = Amps x Volts. From those two simple calculations we can glean the "Resistance" of the "Load" and what it should be. Then we can measure against that to see if there is any disparity, which would indicate the fault. EG: We have a heater it is 2000 Watts, it is in USA and the Voltage there is 120 Volts. First we must get our Current draw, we then divide the Wattage by the Voltage to get our Current draw. So, 2000 Watts, divided by 120 Volts, this equals, In our case, it is, 16.66 Amps. Now we know our Amps we can workout the Resistance of what our Elements will/should be. Now we Divide the Voltage by the Amperage to get this figure, in our case, 120 divided by 16.66 Amps, which is 7.2 OHMS, if there were 2 elements they would simply be 3.6 OHMS each, or any ratio of that. Now sometimes Heaters have a "Thermostat" this device is Powered from the Line, Phase, & Neutral, and using temperature sensing, it will act like a Switch, that is turned on & off, when a "Condition" Chosen Temperature, is met. It simply Breaks the Phase to the "Load". These "Contacts" are in series, with the Phase, and "Act" just like a/the Power Switch. Now in fault finding, we look for "Open" circuit where it should be "Closed" and "Closed" circuit where there should be "Open", also the "Resistance" of the "Elements" or "Load". So basically we are looking for, "Open" or "Short" circuits, and disparities of Resistance.. We remedy same by "Joining" up the "Break" or "Removing" the "Short" and replacing faulty "Loads" or "Elements".

on Mar 02, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

What is causing the battery to drain?


Running the car will drain the battery it if it's not charging ! An if your charging light is on it isn't charging ! Did you check power an grounds on the alternator ? There is a single heavier wire on the back of the alternator, this should have battery voltage ! You may want to take this to a ASE certified repair shop !
Functionality
With the ignition switch in the RUN position, voltage is applied through the warning indicator I circuit 904 (LG/RD) to the voltage regulator. This turns the regulator on, allowing current to flow from battery sense A circuit 35 (OG/LB) to the generator field coil. When the engine is started, the generator begins to generate alternating current (AC) which is internally converted to direct current (DC). This current is then supplied to the vehicle's electrical system through the output (B+) terminal of the generator.
Once the generator begins generating current, a voltage signal is taken from the generator stator and fed back to the regulator S circuit 4 (WH/BK). This voltage feedback signal (typically half the battery voltage) is used to turn off the warning indicator.
With the system functioning normally, the generator output current is determined by the voltage of the A circuit 35 (OG/LB). The A circuit 35 (OG/LB) voltage is compared to a set voltage internal to the regulator, and the regulator controls the generator field current to maintain the correct generator output.
The set voltage will vary with temperature and is typically higher in cold temperatures and lower in warm temperatures. This allows for better battery recharge in the winter and reduces the chance of overcharging in the summer.
Battery Positive Output (B+) Circuit 38 (BK/OG)
The generator output is supplied through the battery positive output (B+) terminal on the back of the generator to the battery and electrical system.
I Circuit 904 (LG/RD)
The I (ignition) circuit 904 (LG/RD) is used to turn on the voltage regulator. This circuit is powered up with the ignition switch in the RUN position. This circuit is also used to turn the charging system warning indicator on if there is a fault in the charging system operation.
A Circuit 35 (OG/LB)
The A (battery sense) circuit 35 (OG/LB) is used to sense battery voltage. This voltage is used by the regulator to determine generator output. This circuit is used to supply current to the generator field (rotor). The amount of current supplied to the rotor will determine generator output.
S Circuit 4 (WH/BK)
The S (stator) circuit 4 (WH/BK) is used to feed back a voltage signal from the generator to the regulator. This voltage is used by the regulator to turn off the charging system warning indicator. The S circuit is fed back externally on external mounted regulator generators.
Visual Inspection Chart Mechanical Electrical
  • Battery case, posts, hold-down clamp, cables and connections
  • Generator drive (serpentine) belt for condition and tension to make sure there is no slip between the belt and the pulley. For additional information, refer to Section 303-05 .
  • Battery charge
  • Generator pulley
  • Battery junction box (BJB)Mega Fuse
  • Battery junction box fuse:
    • 11 (20A)
  • Central junction box (CJB) fuse:
    • 30 (30A)
  • Circuitry
  • Charging system warning indicator
  • Cables
  1. Check the operation of the charging system warning indicator lamp (instrument cluster). Normal operation is as follows:
    • With the ignition switch OFF, the charging system warning indicator should be OFF.
    • With the ignition switch in RUN and the engine off, the charging system warning indicator light should be on.
    • With the engine running, the charging system warning indicator light should be off.
  1. Verify the battery condition. Refer to Section 414-01 .
Normal Charging System Voltages and Charging System Warning Indicator Operation Ignition Switch Position A Circuit 35 (OG/LB) S Circuit 4 (WH/BK) I Circuit 904 (LG/RD) Generator B+ Circuit 38 (BK/OG) Battery Engine to Battery Ground Charging System Warning Indicator Operation OFF 12 volts 0 volts 0 volts 12 volts 12 volts 0 volts Off RUN-engine off 12 volts 0 volts 1-3 volts 12 volts 12 volts 0 volts Illuminated RUN-engine running 13-
15 volts 1/2 battery voltage 13-
15 volts 13-
15 volts 13-
15 volts 0 volts Off
  1. If the customer concern is verified after the initial inspection, refer to the Symptom Chart to determine which tests to carry out.
    • The charging system warning indicator is on with the engine running (the system voltage does not increase)
    • Circuitry.
    • Voltage regulator.
    • Generator.
    • GO to Pinpoint Test B .
    Your whole problem is the alternator is not charging , a couple tests with a volt meter would tell you !

Aug 16, 2015 | 2001 Ford Expedition

1 Answer

1991 yamaha fzr600 overcharging


Hi, Anonymous in order to check out any main system electrical circuit, you have to start with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better, and be able to pass a load test if necessary.
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
2. Check the voltage drop at the battery when you hit the starter button, anything below 9 volts you might have a faulty battery.
3. Check voltage at the battery with the bike running at 3,600 RPM should be 14.3 to 14.7 volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you might have a faulty voltage regulator.
4. Make sure voltage regulator is "GROUNDED" and functioning properly, watch the video below on how to test a voltage regulator.
5. Unplug the connector to the alternator and hook your multimeter leads to the alternator (pin/socket selection does not matter) set the multimeter to AC volts, at an idle the meter should read 16 to 20 volts AC. at 2,000 RPM 32 to 40 AC volts, 3,000 RPM 48 to 60 AC volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you may have a faulty rotor, follow step 6
6. Set the multimeter to OHM'S, connect one lead to the alternator (any pin/socket) and the other to a ground, the meter should read infinity. Connect both leads to the alternator meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 OHM'S. If you are not getting these numbers, you have a bad stator.
7. Check all wiring in the charging circuit for worn or chaffed spots and all wiring connectors in the circuit for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets, which is the # 1 offender.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please visit the websites below. Good luck and have a nice day.
Charging System Test Questions The FZR Forum
FZR600 generator charging issues
https://www.tradebit.com/filedetail.php/269137237-yamaha-fzr600-1989-1999-factory-service-repair-manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://www.fzrarchives.com/fzr600/600_manual/1999fzr600r.pdf

Dec 30, 2013 | 1989 Yamaha FZR 600

1 Answer

Cane home, bike been on tirickle charger for months. Lights all bright but bottom light on dash goes off but hesistates....anyway you hit the start button and zero happens


Hi, Jim in order to check out any main system electrical circuit, you have to start with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better, and be able to pass a load test if necessary.
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
2. Check the voltage drop at the battery when you hit the starter button, anything below 9 volts you might have a faulty battery.
3. Check voltage at the battery with the bike running at 3,600 RPM should be 14.3 to 14.7 volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you might have a faulty voltage regulator.
4. Make sure voltage regulator is grounded and functioning properly, watch the video below on how to test a voltage regulator.
5. Unplug the connector to the alternator and hook your multimeter leads to the alternator (pin/socket selection does not matter) set the multimeter to AC volts, at an idle the meter should read 16 to 20 volts AC. at 2,000 RPM 32 to 40 AC volts, 3,000 RPM 48 to 60 AC volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you may have a faulty rotor, follow step 6
6. Set the multimeter to OHM'S, connect one lead to the alternator (any pin/socket) and the other to a ground, the meter should read infinity. Connect both leads to the alternator meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 OHM'S. If you are not getting these numbers, you have a bad stator.
7. Check all wiring in the charging circuit for worn or chaffed spots and all wiring connectors in the circuit for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets, which is the # 1 offender.
For more information about your issue and valuable free downloads that you will need please visit the websites below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://www.ducatimonster.org/forums/tech/227745-help-needed-w-3-phase-charging-system-diagnosis.html
How to Test Motorcycle Charging System
DOWNLOAD Ducati Monster 695
Ducati OEM Parts Fiche Lookup and Online Ordering
Ducati Maintenance

Sep 02, 2013 | 2007 Ducati Monster 695

1 Answer

I have a 1996 fzr 600 , it shut off going down the road , went to start bile. But batt was completely dead , pushed it off it ran for about a mile or two n died , bike is not charging at all could this be...


Hi, Jporzio82 in order to check out any main system electrical circuit, you have to start with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better, and be able to pass a load test if necessary.
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
2. Check the voltage drop at the battery when you hit the starter button, anything below 9 volts you might have a faulty battery.
3. Check voltage at the battery with the bike running at 3,600 RPM should be 14.3 to 14.7 volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you might have a faulty voltage regulator.
4. Make sure voltage regulator is "GROUNDED" and functioning properly, watch the video below on how to test a voltage regulator.
5. Unplug the connector to the alternator and hook your multimeter leads to the alternator (pin/socket selection does not matter) set the multimeter to AC volts, at an idle the meter should read 16 to 20 volts AC. at 2,000 RPM 32 to 40 AC volts, 3,000 RPM 48 to 60 AC volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you may have a faulty rotor, follow step 6
6. Set the multimeter to OHM'S, connect one lead to the alternator (any pin/socket) and the other to a ground, the meter should read infinity. Connect both leads to the alternator meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 OHM'S. If you are not getting these numbers, you have a bad stator.
7. Check all wiring in the charging circuit for worn or chaffed spots and all wiring connectors in the circuit for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets, which is the # 1 offender.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please visit the websites below. Good luck and have a nice day.
battery not charging The FZR Forum
FZR600 generator charging issues
https://www.tradebit.com/filedetail.php/2864660-yamaha-fzr-600-service-repair-manual-pdf
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-fz-owners-manuals

Apr 04, 2012 | 1995 Yamaha FZR 600

1 Answer

I have a briggs and stratton 8500/5500 generator which I am using to power an air conditioner on a camper trailer. I just recently started having a problem where the one circuit breaker keeps tripping when...


Hello, First figure out what the load per leg is on your generator. Are you using the 240 Volts because this is two 120 AC volts legs and they are 120 degrees out of phase with each other.

You will need to figure what the power factor is for each phase on this generator. To figure the power/wattage by using ohm's law. Voltage times Current will give you Watts. Example: If the generator is generator 240 volts the maximum current available is about 23 amps. The maximum current for 120 volts will 46 amps. Therefore, the maximum current per 120 volt circuit is 23 amps for one circuit and 23 amps for the second 120 circuit..

I would try replacing the circuit breaker with the same amperage breaker. Also, watch what the generator load is per circuit. You can install current meter for each circuit. This will give a good indication of which circuit is pulling more load than the other circuit. GB...stewbison

Sep 06, 2011 | Briggs & Stratton Power Products 5,550...

1 Answer

The coleman voltage generator for 250 kva gen set


Well I assume that this generator is NOT three Phase, and delivering 440 Volts? in that case, that reading is what is called and "Open Circuit" reading, with a full load, that reading will/should come down to the nominal voltage of 250 V (+/- 10%) This generator is a 250 V AC unit? If this is so then it is operating correctly? It is 5kw UNIT. using a digital multimeter due to it's large input impedance it will often give erroneous readings if NOT loaded down with the correct.any. load.?

Mar 02, 2010 | Coleman Powermate Powermate 5000W...

1 Answer

67 votage display on generator output.


Please stop making new problem threads each time you answer, instead post a comment to one of the 5 threads you already have open for this problem. It's getting hard to follow the conversation :-)

OK, now to the problem. You say you have checked 67 volts is displayed on the generator output, I think this means that you see 67 volts on the control panel display when the generator is running. This can be several different problems:
a) a bad CT/PT module that tells the controller the wrong voltage
b) a bad A/D module inside the controller itself
c) a bad voltage regulator

Get a real DMM meter and measure the voltages at the top side of the output (large) circuit breaker of the generator. Put the black lead of the meter on the neutral wire and then measure to each of the phase wires on the circuit breaker. If you get normal voltages then you probably have a bad A/D, if you get 67 volts on all 3 phases you have some other problem.

You still haven't told me what model/spec of generator this is, look on the data sticker on the generator cabinet.

Peace,
Carl

Dec 14, 2008 | Coleman Powermate Powermate 5000W...

1 Answer

No power


Since this generator quit working suddenly it's likley that something is wrong with the field circuit inside. The metal surfaces you cleaned off sound like the slip rings of the rotor, there should have been 2 graphite square rods mounted on the plastic bit you took off that ride on these slip rings, they could be worn down or broken.
You'll need a good DMM to measure the resistance between the 2 slip rings (should be about 15 ohms), also measure each of the stator coils (black and white wires in the molex plug) look for an open.
Because the generator has been sitting for a couple of years it probably also hsa lost its residual magnetism, you'll need to flash the field to get it working again once all the parts are confirmed to be OK.

Oct 07, 2008 | Coleman Powermate Powermate 5000W...

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