Question about 1993 Honda CBR 1000 F

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1993 CBR 1000 Rear brake pedal drifts down when depressed and does not give any significant braking force unless pumped repeatedly. After doing this, the calipers will retract so far that they lose contact with the rear brake pads. Taking the distribution valve out of the system demonstrated perfect functioning of the rear master and rear caliper, although some of the rear calipers were not actuated. In this setup, there was no brake fade. Re-connected the distribution valve and re-bled the system thoroughly and brake fade returned. Considering replacing the anti-dive unit -- really not sure what to do next. Suggestions?

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  • aaron_freedo Aug 05, 2010

    If I was going to test the distribution valve, how would I do so?

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2 Answers

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  • Honda Master
  • 2,030 Answers

Change both the anti dive unit and the rear master cylnder.

Posted on Aug 06, 2010

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  • Master
  • 11,896 Answers

If you have bled the system, and calipers are full retracting properly, and caliper pistons are not sticking, I would test or replace the distribution valve that are in these units. They have been known to go faulty

Posted on Aug 05, 2010

  • Nate Stansfield
    Nate Stansfield Aug 05, 2010

    Use a voltmeter to test battery power to the block as well as low power source. Then from block to accessorie box.
    Use an ohmmeter to test from ground wire to ground surface. You should have some continuity

  • Nate Stansfield
    Nate Stansfield Aug 06, 2010

    Other than providing
    the braking distance, the test system needed to log the brake hydraulic
    pressure, the temperature of the brake pad, and the speed of the
    motorbike throughout the test. Since the entire test only lasts a couple
    of seconds, the system had to log at least 1,000 S/s of data on each
    channel.

    Pricol also needed a
    compact user interface so that the rider could input parameters and
    view the results during the road tests. An off-line analysis routine was
    necessary for post-test analysis in the lab.

    The system had to
    handle the vibrations and accidental falls that it would encounter
    during testing. Since the brake testing would be performed in all types
    of conditions, the shock and vibration requirements called for a rugged
    in-vehicle system.

    System Description

    The following sensors acquire the signals:



    • Rotation Encoder—for rotational displacement and the wheel speed.

    • Accelerometer—for the instantaneous acceleration of the vehicle.

    • Thermocouple—for pad temperature during braking.

    • Pressure Sensor—for the brake hydraulic fluid pressure.

    Soliton Automation
    attached the 1,000-pulses-per-revolution (ppr) rotational encoder to the
    hub of the front wheel of the motorbike and mounted a capacitive
    accelerometer near the center of gravity of the motorbike to directly
    measure the instantaneous acceleration of the motorbike. During a brake
    test, the acceleration of interest is derived from the DC signal after
    filtering out the AC components produced by the vibrations present at
    the mounting point. The thermocouple is bonded to the brake pad using a
    high-temperature bonding adhesive.

    The possibility of using an off-the-shelf datalogger was discarded in favor of a PC-based system. Off-the-shelf dataloggers
    did not offer the versatility that Pricol needed, but Soliton
    Automation could program a PC-based system to fulfill the requirements.
    The PC-based system also had a user-friendly interface for the rider
    during the testing.

    The FieldWorks FW2000 Series Computer from Kontron Mobile Computing suited the application
    both in terms of size and ruggedness. Two PCMCIA slots were available
    to include a data acquisition board and an Ethernet board.

    A multichannel E
    Series PCMCIA high-speed data acquisition board from National
    Instruments provided the necessary analog inputs and the counter/timer
    inputs for the application. The FieldWorks computer uses a Pentium
    processor and runs Windows 98. The application software was developed in
    National Instruments’ LabVIEW 6i.

    Soliton Automation
    designed a low-cost, compact, and rugged microcontroller-based
    integrated keyboard display for the user interface. The unit, with 14
    keys and a two-line LCD, mounts on the handlebar of the motorbike and
    interfaces to the computer using the RS-232 serial port.

    A 12-V battery
    powers the FieldWorks computer, the user interface, and all the sensors
    and associated signal-conditioning units. A separate battery isolates
    the data acquisition system from the motorbike’s electrical system for
    noise immunity. During extended field trials, the battery is switched
    with the one on the bike for recharging using the bike’s charging
    system.


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1 Answer

Bleeding brakes on my 1993 Cadillac Eldorado


This takes 2 people master cylinder is full lid back on . have assistant pump brake pedal 3 times then hold down saying "holding" then you loosen bleeder screw on right rear brake slowly air will come out then a little fluid. tighten screw and say pump it up "holding" as fluid in coming out pedal will sink "Keep pressing" repeat util clean fluid appears. check master fluid level now repeat left rear. fluid level right front fluid level left front fluid level once complte you should have a firm pedal.

May 03, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 1993 cbr 1000f with linked brakes.they worked fine for years then last month the rear brake locked up while riding and destroyed the caliper and disc, i replaced the parts and it seems to work...


Firstly I would check that the rear brake return spring is working and returning the pedal to the full up position, next try the rear master cylinder, and then the proportion control valve because it seems as though you have a sticking problem.

Jun 29, 2012 | 1993 Honda CBR 1000 F

2 Answers

I have a 2004 Land cruiser and changed the right rear brake cyl and brake shoes . What is the proper procedure to bleed the rear brake system. Thank you for your help.


  1. Check the fluid level in the reservoir after bleeding each wheel. Add DOT3 fluid, if necessary.
  2. If the master cylinder was disassembled or if the reservoir becomes empty, bleed the air from the master cylinder as follows:
    1. Disconnect the brake lines from the master cylinder.
    2. Slowly depress the brake pedal and hold it.
    3. Block off the outlet plug with your finger, and release the brake pedal.
    4. Repeat 3 or 4 times.

  3. Bleed the brake starting with the one furthest from the reservoir and then the next furthest, etc.
  4. Depress the brake pedal several times, then loosen the bleeder plug with the pedal held down.
  5. At the point when fluid stops coming out, tighten the bleeder plug to 11 Nm (8 ft. lbs.), then release the brake pedal.
  6. Repeat until all the air in the fluid has been bled out.
  7. Repeat the procedure to bleed the air out of brake line for each wheel.
  8. Check the fluid level and add DOT3 fluid if necessary.

Aug 07, 2011 | 2004 Toyota Land Cruiser

1 Answer

How to bleed rear brakes


  1. Remove the top of the master cylinder reservoir.
  2. Using a turkey baster, **** out as much of the old dark inky fluid as you can.
  3. Clean any sediment out of the reservoir with a clean, lint-free rag. (Do not spill any brake fluid on any painted surfaces, it will remove the paint immediately.)
  4. Fill the master cylinder with clean brake fluid.
  5. Replace the top of the master cylinder reservoir.
  6. Pump the brake pedal several times (15 or more).
  7. Using a box wrench that fits the bleeder bolt, loosen the bleeder valves, but leave them closed. (A little penetrating oil drizzled on the bolts the day before will help to loosen them).
  8. Using a piece of clear plastic tubing (aquarium tubing works fine), push one end of the tube over the brake bleeder bolt.
  9. Put the other end of the tube into a small, clear bottle with an inch or two of clean brake fluid in it. (This will keep air from being sucked back into the brake cylinder.)
  10. Put a piece of 1 x 4 lumber or some other "spacer" under the brake pedal to prevent the pedal from traveling too close to the floor.
  11. Remove the top of the master cylinder reservoir.
  12. Top off the master cylinder reservoir with fresh fluid.
  13. Replace the top of the master cylinder reservoir.
  14. Have your helper sit in the driver's seat and slowly depresses the brake pedal with an even force and hold it down. The helper should shout "down" when the pedal is down as far as it will go.
  15. 15Starting with the rear passenger wheel (back right for righthand drive cars), turn the bleeder bolt to the left one quarter-turn. Old fluid and air will go down the tubing into the bottle. When the fluid stops, close the bleeder valve.
  16. Shout "up" to your helper, who at this point should remove his foot from the pedal allowing it to move up.
  17. Repeat this process until new, clear fluid comes from the bleeder tube. (After every five (5) times the brake pedal is depressed, top off the master cylinder reservoir with fresh fluid. Never let the reservoir get too low, or air will be sucked into the master cylinder.)
  18. Tighten the bleeder bolt.
  19. Repeat steps 14 to 17 on the left rear wheel.
  20. Repeat steps 14 to 17 on the right front wheel.
  21. Repeat steps 14 to 17 on the left front wheel.

Jun 23, 2011 | Harley Davidson Springbok Harley-davidson...

3 Answers

My brake pedal sinks all the way down and won't come to a complete stop unless I pump the breaks. When I'm stopped at a light the brake pedal is fine at first but it will slowly sink down again. I'll pump...


There could be any number of things wrong from air in the lines to a leak of fluid. In any case you need to get the car to a mechanic as it loss of brakes is very dangerous.

Dec 18, 2010 | 1993 Honda Prelude

1 Answer

I'm a mid-age woman w/a 94 DeVille that I want to change the brake fluid myself. How do I do that? Thank you!


BRAKE SYSTEM BLEEDING Diagonal Split System MASTER CYLINDER
  1. Refill the master cylinder reservoir.
  2. Push the plunger several times to force fluid into the piston.
  3. Continue pumping the plunger until the fluid is free of the air bubbles.
  4. Plug the outlet ports and install the master cylinder.
COMPLETE SYSTEM
  1. Fill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid. Check the level often during the procedure.
  2. Starting with the right rear wheel, remove the protective cap from the bleeder, if equipped, and place where it will not be lost. Clean the bleed screw. When bleeding the brakes, keep face away from the brake area. Spewing fluid may cause facial and/or visual damage. Do not allow brake fluid to spill on the vehicle's finish; it will remove the paint.
  3. If the system is empty, the most efficient way to get fluid down to the wheel is to loosen the bleeder about 1?2 - 3?4 turn, place a finger firmly over the bleeder and have a helper pump the brakes slowly until fluid comes out the bleeder. Once fluid is at the bleeder, close it before the pedal is released inside the vehicle. NOTE: If the pedal is pumped rapidly, the fluid will churn and create small air bubbles, which are difficult to remove from the system. These air bubbles will eventually congregate resulting in a spongy pedal.
  4. Once fluid has been pumped to the caliper or wheel cylinder, open the bleed screw again, have the helper press the brake pedal to the floor, lock the bleeder and have the helper slowly release the pedal. Wait 15 seconds and repeat the procedure (including the 15 second wait) until no more air comes out of the bleeder upon application of the brake pedal. Remember to close the bleeder before the pedal is released inside the vehicle each time the bleeder is opened. If not, air will be induced into the system.
  5. If a helper is not available, connect a small hose to the bleeder, place the end in a container of brake fluid and proceed to pump the pedal from inside the vehicle until no more air comes out the bleeder. The hose will prevent air from entering the system.
  6. Repeat the procedure on remaining wheel cylinders in order:
    1. Step 1: Left front
    2. Step 2: Left rear
    3. Step 3: Right front
  7. Hydraulic brake systems must be totally flushed if the fluid becomes contaminated with water, dirt or other corrosive chemicals. To flush, bleed the entire system until all fluid has been replaced with the correct type of new fluid.
  8. Install the bleeder cap(s) on the bleeder to keep dirt out. Always road test the vehicle after brake work of any kind is done.
Teves® Anti-lock Brake System FRONT BRAKES
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF throughout this procedure.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Remove the reservoir cap. Check and/or refill the master cylinder reservoir.
  4. Using the bleeder adapter tool, install it onto the fluid reservoir.
  5. Attach a diaphragm type pressure bleeder to the adapter and charge the bleeder to 20 psi.
  6. Using a transparent vinyl tube, connect it to either front wheel caliper and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  7. Open the bleeder valve 1?2 - 3?4 turn and purge the caliper until bubble free fluid flows from the hose.
  8. Tighten the bleeder screw and remove the bleeder equipment.
  9. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the pump to charge the accumulator.
  10. After bleeding, inspect the pedal for sponginess and the brake warning light for unbalanced pressure; if either of the conditions exist, repeat the bleeding procedure.
REAR BRAKES
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Check and/or refill the master cylinder reservoir.
  4. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the system to charge. NOTE: The pump will turn OFF when the system is charged.
  5. Using a transparent vinyl tube, connect it to a rear wheel bleeder valve and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  6. Open the bleeder valve 1?2 - 3?4 turn and slightly depress the brake pedal for at least 10 seconds or until air is removed from the brake system. Close the bleeder valve. NOTE: It is a good idea to check the fluid level several times during the bleeding operation. Remember, depressurize the system before checking the reservoir fluid.
  7. Repeat the bleeding procedure for the other rear wheel.
  8. After bleeding, inspect the pedal for sponginess and the brake warning light for unbalanced pressure; if either of the conditions exist, repeat the bleeding procedure.
Bosch® III Anti-lock Brake System
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Check and/or refill the reservoir to the full mark.
  4. Using a transparent vinyl hose, connect it to a pump bleeder screw and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  5. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  6. Move the transparent vinyl hose to the hydraulic unit bleeder screw. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  7. Disconnect the bleeder hose.
  8. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the hydraulic unit to charge; the pump should turn OFF after 30 seconds.
Bosch® 2U Anti-lock Brake System
  1. Turn the ignition switch OFF.
  2. Using at least 50 lbs. pressure on the brake pedal, depress the pedal at least 25 times; a noticeable change in pedal pressure will be noticed when the accumulator is discharged.
  3. Check and/or refill the reservoir to the full mark.
  4. Using a transparent vinyl hose, connect it to a pump bleeder screw and insert the other end in a beaker 1?2 full of clean brake fluid.
  5. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  6. Move the transparent vinyl hose to the hydraulic unit bleeder screw. Loosen the bleeder screw 1?2 - 3?4 turn. Turn the ignition switch ON; the pump should run forcing fluid from the hose. When the fluid becomes bubble-free, turn the ignition switch OFF, tighten the bleeder screw.
  7. Disconnect the bleeder hose.
  8. Turn the ignition switch ON and allow the hydraulic unit to charge; the pump should turn OFF after 30 seconds.
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Sep 02, 2010 | 1994 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

Brake pedal goes to floor on first depression; then pumps up fine


Try this,apply the emergency before stepping on the brake.
If this helps the pedal,the rear brakes are out of adjustment.

Jul 01, 2010 | 2000 Saturn L-Series

2 Answers

Does this model brakes front and rear at the same time when we press just front break ?


no ...you have a rear brake pedal to control the rear brake and the front is controlled by a brake lever which supplies 3/4 of all stopping power. Dont ever slam down on the rear brake pedal just apply it gradually.

Mar 29, 2010 | 1993 Honda CBR 1000 F

1 Answer

Is there a special way to bleed the brake system on a 2001 catera


  1. Place a clean shop cloth beneath the brake master cylinder to prevent brake fluid spills.
  2. With the ignition OFF and the brakes cool, apply the brakes 3-5 times, or until the brake pedal effort increases significantly, in order to deplete the brake booster power reserve.

Fill the brake master cylinder reservoir with DOT-3 brake fluid from a clean, sealed brake fluid container. Ensure that the brake master cylinder reservoir remains at least half-full during this bleeding procedure. Add fluid as needed to maintain the proper level. Clean the outside of the reservoir on and around the reservoir cap prior to removing the cap and diaphragm.
  1. Install a proper box-end wrench onto the RIGHT REAR wheel hydraulic circuit bleeder valve.
  2. Install a transparent hose over the end of the bleeder valve.
  3. Submerge the open end of the transparent hose into a transparent container partially filled DOT-3 brake fluid from a clean, sealed brake fluid container.
  4. Have an assistant slowly depress the brake pedal fully and maintain steady pressure on the pedal.
  5. Loosen the bleeder valve to purge air from the wheel hydraulic circuit.
  6. Tighten the bleeder valve, then have the assistant slowly release the brake pedal.
  7. Wait 15 seconds, then repeat these steps until all air is purged from the same wheel hydraulic circuit.
  8. Repeat this procedure with the LEFT FRONT, then LEFT REAR and finally the RIGHT FRONT.
  9. Fill the brake master cylinder reservoir to the maximum-fill level with DOT-3 brake fluid from a clean, sealed brake fluid container.
  10. Slowly depress and release the brake pedal. Observe the feel of the brake pedal.

Feb 27, 2010 | 2001 Cadillac Catera

2 Answers

How do you bleed the brakes


you rally should have two people one to operate pedal open a bleeder screw start at left rear have them push the pedal down and hold it tighten bleeder repeat 4 -5 times unless there is air then go til just fluid comes out then go to right rear right front then left front

Jul 21, 2009 | Plymouth Voyager Cars & Trucks

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