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There's a miss when I crack the the throttle. Seem's o.k. When slowly rolling on. I noticed a vacuum line on the right side head or rocker that has no hose going to it is this the way it supposed to be? And is there a fuel filter that could be bad. This is a 1981 Gpz 1100 with 17000 miles.

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Fuel intake ( jets) or too little or too much air poss spark plugs well worn take out and inspect but i would say fuel check carbs out could just be **** in them

Posted on Jul 28, 2010

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1 Answer

Have a 2006 chrysler 300, 3.5 with loud ticking noise during acceleration, also experiencing loss of power. Replaced both rocker assemblies and performance improved but ticking is still there.


sounds like bad valve seats or seals do you have a oil pressure gauge on your dash.check the pressure.then check your return ports on top of the head thats giving you the problem see if the oil is returning to the oil pan.sometimes the return ports become blocked and the oil stays on top of the head.and see if the oil supply is making up to the head.hope this helps.mark

Feb 19, 2014 | 2006 Chrysler 300

Tip

P0401 Error, Insufficient EGR Flow


In my case this was caused by a bad hose from the Throttle Body to the EGR Vacuum Switching Valve. Pictures are taken from the left side of the car except for the picture of the original hose. This is with the 4 cylinder engine. I used a piece of fuel/vacuum line that I had. It fit snugly which made my cost of repair zero.
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This is the end of the original hose with the crack plainly visible.

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Hose run from the throttle to the VSV

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Replacement hose at throttle (far right). This is where it was cracked.

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Replacement hose (far right) on the VSV.

on Oct 30, 2015 | 1996 Toyota Camry

1 Answer

1980 Cadillac Biarritz 368 running rich and lost of vacuum


Did you ever figure out the problem just wondering I'm having the same problem out pf my 1981 Cadillac eldorado biarritz one sides cool the driver side passanger sides hot and it misses bad

Dec 29, 2012 | 1980 Cadillac Eldorado

3 Answers

Do I have to take the timming belt off to do a head gasket on a 1999 chevy malibu v6 3.1L


The 3.1 engine does not have a belt,it is a chain motor.You do not need to remove timing chain to remove head.

Apr 12, 2011 | 1999 Chevrolet Malibu

1 Answer

Intakegasket for grandam gt


Exactly what is the wrong? Need the part? Need to know torque adjust or porcedure to take off?

For
1994 Pontiac Grand Am 3.1L SFI OHV 6cyl check this procedure for Intake Manifold...
(see Figure 14)
The 3.1L engine is equipped with upper and lower intake manifolds. The upper intake manifold is also known as the intake manifold plenum.

CAUTION The fuel system is under pressure and must be properly relieved before disconnecting the fuel lines. Failure to properly relieve the fuel system pressure can lead to personal injury and component damage.
  1. Relieve the fuel system pressure.
  2. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  3. Remove top half of the air cleaner assembly and throttle body duct.
  4. Drain and recycle the engine coolant.
  5. Disconnect the EGR pipe from exhaust manifold.
  6. Remove the serpentine belt.
  7. Remove the brake vacuum pipe at the intake plenum.
  8. Disconnect the control cables from the throttle body and intake plenum mounting bracket.
  9. Remove the power steering lines at the alternator bracket.
  10. Remove the alternator.
  11. Label and disconnect the ignition wires from the spark plugs and wire retainers on the intake plenum.
  12. Remove the ignition assembly and the EVAP canister purge solenoid together.
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Fig. 14: View of the intake manifold and related components

  1. Disconnect the upper engine wiring harness connectors at the following components:
    Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) Idle Air Control (IAC) Fuel Injectors Coolant temperature sensor Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) sensor Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor
  2. Tag and disconnect the vacuum lines from the following components:
    Vacuum modulator Fuel pressure regulator PCV valve
  3. Disconnect the MAP sensor from upper intake manifold.
  4. Remove the upper intake plenum mounting bolts and lift off the plenum.
  5. Disconnect the fuel lines from the fuel rail and bracket.
  6. Install engine support fixture special tool J 28467-A or an equivalent.
  7. Remove the right side engine mount.
  8. Remove the power steering mounting bolts and support the pump out of the way without disconnecting the power steering lines.
  9. Disconnect the coolant inlet pipe from the outlet housing.
  10. Remove the coolant bypass hose from the water pump and the cylinder head.
  11. Disconnect the upper radiator hose at thermostat housing.
  12. Remove the thermostat housing.
  13. Remove both rocker arm covers.
  14. Remove the lower intake manifold bolts. Make sure the washers on the four center bolts are installed in their original locations.
When removing the valve train components they should be kept in order for installation the original locations.
  1. Remove the rocker arm retaining nuts or bolts and extract the rocker arms and pushrods.
  2. Remove the intake manifold from the engine. Remove and discard the gasket.
  3. Using a suitable scraper, clean gasket material from all mating surfaces. Remove all excess RTV sealant from front and rear ridges of cylinder block
To install:
  1. Place a 0.12 inch (3mm) bead of RTV, on each ridge, where the front and rear of the intake manifold contact the block.
  2. Using a new gasket, place the intake manifold on the engine.
  3. Install the pushrods in their original locations. Coat the pushrods with prelube.
The intake pushrods are marked yellow (5 3 /4 inch long) and the exhaust are green (6 inches long). Make sure the pushrods are properly seated in the valve lifters and rocker arms.
  1. Position the rocker arms in there original locations and tighten to specifications. Refer to the procedure earlier in this section.
  2. Install lower the intake manifold attaching bolts. Apply sealant 12345739 (or equivalent thread locking compound) to the threads of bolts. Tighten the vertical bolts first then the diagonal bolts to 115 inch lbs. (13 Nm).
  3. Install the front rocker arm cover.
  4. Install the thermostat housing.
  5. Connect the upper radiator hose to the thermostat housing.
  6. Fasten the coolant inlet pipe to thermostat housing.
  7. Connect coolant bypass pipe at the water pump and cylinder head.
  8. Install the power steering pump in the mounting bracket.
  9. Loosely install the serpentine belt.
  10. Connect the right side engine mount.
  11. Remove the special engine support tool.
  12. Fasten the fuel lines to fuel rail and bracket.
  13. Install the upper intake manifold and tighten the mounting bolts to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm).
  14. Install the MAP sensor.
  15. Connect the upper engine wiring harness connectors to the related components removed earlier.
  16. Connect the vacuum lines to the PCV, vacuum modulator and fuel pressure regulator.
  17. Install the EVAP canister purge solenoid and ignition assembly.
  18. Install the alternator assembly.
  19. Connect the power steering line to the alternator bracket.
  20. Install the serpentine belt.
  21. Connect the spark plug wires to the spark plugs and intake plenum wire retainer.
  22. Install the EGR pipe to the exhaust manifold.
  23. Attach the control cables to the throttle body lever and upper intake plenum mounting bracket.
  24. Install air intake assembly and top half of the air cleaner assembly.
  25. Install the brake vacuum pipe.
  26. Fill the cooling system.
  27. Connect the negative battery cable, then start the vehicle and verify that there are no leaks.

For PARTS REPLACEMENT check in THIS LINK: carpartswholesale.com

Hope helps.

Feb 01, 2011 | 1994 Pontiac Grand Am

1 Answer

I need to know how to set the timing belt on a 1995 nissan 3.0 4x4 kingcab truck


I'm going to copy the procedure from Autozone.com below. I've never seen such a complicated way of getting the tension right, but better to follow their instructions, I guess. Note that they ask you to loosen the rocker shafts, but they never tell you to put them back. I will add that.

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To install:

6. Remove both cylinder head covers and loosen all rocker arm shaft retaining bolts.

The rocker arm shaft bolts MUST be loosened so that the correct belt tension can be obtained.
  1. Install the tensioner and the return spring. Using a hexagon wrench, turn the tensioner clockwise, then temporarily tighten the locknut.
  2. Make sure that the timing belt is clean and free from oil or water, before installation.
  3. Install the timing belt. Align the white lines on the belt with the punchmarks on the camshaft and crankshaft sprockets. Be sure to have the arrow on the timing belt pointing toward the front belt covers.
A good way (although rather tedious) to check for proper timing belt installation is to count the number of belt teeth between the timing marks. There are 133 teeth on the belt; there should be 40 teeth between the timing marks on the left and right-side camshaft sprockets, and 43 teeth between the timing marks on the left-side camshaft sprocket and the crankshaft sprocket.
  1. While keeping the tensioner steady, loosen the locknut with a hexagon wrench.
  2. Turn the tension approximately 70-80 degrees clockwise with the wrench, then tighten the locknut.
  3. Turn the crankshaft in a clockwise direction several times, then slowly set the No. 1 piston to TDC of the compression stroke.
  4. Apply 22 lbs. (10 kg) of pressure (push it in) to the center span of the timing belt between the right-side camshaft sprocket and the tensioner pulley, then loosen the tensioner locknut.
  5. Using a 0.0138 in. (0.35mm) feeler gauge (the actual width of the blade must be 1/2 in. or 12.7mm thick), positioned as shown in the illustration, slowly turn the crankshaft clockwise. The timing belt should move approximately 2 1/2 teeth. Tighten the tensioner locknut, then turn the crankshaft slightly and remove the feeler gauge.
  6. Slowly rotate the crankshaft clockwise several more times , then set the No. 1 piston to TDC of the compression stroke; recheck all alignment marks.
  7. Install the upper and lower timing belt covers.
  8. Connect the negative battery cable.

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When installing the rocker arm shafts, be certain that they are installed in their original positions.
  1. Make sure the camshaft knock pin is at the top of the camshaft and that the lobe is not in the lifted position. If servicing the left-side cylinder head, set the No. 1 piston at TDC of its compression stroke, then tighten the rocker shaft bolts for cylinder No. 2, 4 and 6 cylinders. If servicing the right-side cylinder head, set the No. 4 piston at TDC of its compression stroke and tighten the rocker shaft bolts for cylinder No. 1, 3 and 5 cylinder rocker shaft bolts. Tighten all bolts gradually, in two or three stages, to 13-16 ft. lbs. (18-22 Nm).
  2. Install the cylinder head cover(s).

Sep 12, 2010 | 1995 Nissan King Cab

1 Answer

When you push the gas pedel the vehicle accelerates slowly


could be bad fuel pump to clogging fuel filter to needing a new air filter or a mere tune up ...check for the obvious ..ex. corroded or cracked vacuum lines or just plain obvious wires or vacuum lines missing or maby just a shot of carb-cleaner and oil the lines to the throttle body may help

Nov 01, 2009 | 2002 Mazda Tribute

3 Answers

Oily foam in rocker cover breather pipe


if it has been over heated, problem is head gasket... When it's cold, remove the radiator filler cap.... watch for bubbles, and look for heavy sweet smelling exhaust (this is not always typical). You also may just have alot of blowbye oil.... especially considering the mileage... i would recommend a quality remanufactured long block

Sep 12, 2009 | 1994 Jaguar XJ6

1 Answer

1991 S10 2.5L throttle body idles to fast


A vehicle that old will suffer from brittle and cracked vacuum lines. I would say there is a bad, or several bad lines leaking away vacuum from the intake manifold. Don't forget to check the hose going to the PCV on the valve cover. A vacuum leak will also cause the engine to stumble and miss intermittently when idling.

Jun 26, 2009 | 1991 Chevrolet S-10

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