Question about 1998 Suzuki GSX-R 600

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I hear a grinding noise coming from the front sprocket area of my bike and i see a bunch of tiny shards of metal by the top of the chain and around the spring. I need to find out whats grinding. Could it be the front sprocket??

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Could be the front sprocket or the chain is stretched and not seating properly, replacement of both sprockets and chain will be required

Posted on Jul 28, 2010

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1 Answer

Engine runs but wheels do not move


This could be a few things:
1) Your clutch plates may have worn out so that even when the bike is in gear, it will just rev, but no power will be transmitted to the drive shaft (smaller front chain sprocket is the driving gear, larger rear sprocket on the back wheel is the driven gear)
2) The front chain drive sprocket has come off under the cover on the motor - if the chain is really slack, have a look.
3) The front chain drive sprocket SHAFT has sheared. (basically, meaning that the shaft has broken into two parts as it couldn't handle the drive power (torque) being delivered through it to the chain drive) With the motor on, listen for grinding noises internally
when you rev, from the vicinity of the front chain drive cover. If its rough and grindy, the shaft may be sheared. Then with the motor off, take the cover off and leverage the small chain drive sprocket away from the motor with a screwdriver, and see if the shaft can just be pulled out of its sealed opening. Unfortunately with these bikes, the metals used in drive shafts and motors are not always heat-treated or hardened to the standard they should be, so shearing and premature failure can happen.
4) The gearbox or something in it has blown, unfortunately for the same reason above, quality related.
Its fair to say that these great little bikes are here for a good time, but not for a long time.

Apr 11, 2014 | Razor MX350 DIRT ROCKET - BLUE

1 Answer

Checking timing chain


They are a bit noisy sometimes, hopefully it's nothing serious, good solid bikes those so you should be good.
Check you have the correct oil in there, if your running a thin oil, it may increase the noise and wearing.
Try this, when its parked up and idling cold (when you start it up in the morning) get a screwdriver or somthing similar place the metal part of the screwdriver on the engine where you think the noise is coming from, then put your ear on the handle, doing this you will be able to pin point exactly where the noise is coming from buy moving the screwdriver around the casting also you can really hear her tick.
do it again when she's hot noting the difference of any. If it continues to get noisier, strip her down and have a look in there, could be just the tensioner/guides.
good luck

Feb 06, 2014 | Honda VT 600 CD Shadow Motorcycles

1 Answer

Grinding noise when accelerating


HI If your bike is chain drive, look at the chain tension, the chain could be hitting the gear box case. If you primary sprocket is worn the the chain could be jumping teeth If you have a shaft drive then inspect the universal joints and the differential oil level

Feb 02, 2014 | kawasaki Motorcycles

1 Answer

Weird noise


Evert,
First, DO NOT crank this bike for now!
Troubleshooting time!

1. The other culprit could be/is the drive line - chain/front sprocket/rear sprocket. Carefully examine the area around the front sprocket where the chain rides to see if there is contact to any of the engine cases/swingarm area. IF this area is the cause you will see obvious signs of the chain rubbing something.. or the chain is excessively worn and loose and dry.
Look carefully around the drive line .... if you see nothing wrong.. then its internal

2. Drain the oil in a clean drain pan...one that can easily hold all the oil... you are going to run a magnet around in the used oil to see if there are any magnetic particles (a minute quantity of microscopic ones are normal).. you are looking for a quantity of larger chips or particles..(indication of internal damage). If a magnet does not show any unusual particles, then CAREFULLY pour the oil - SLOWLY! - through a FINE FILTER..(***** hose works well)..you need to see if there is aluminum ground up in the oil..(your engine will grind up aluminum!!) it will pack into crevices and corners...it will be very fine if it comes out with the oil. After this remove your oil filter... carefully cut it open and look for metal contamination(see above).
IF you find ANYTHING in these test, you need to find out why! This will involve a professional mechanic and some disassembly of the engine. The problem will be obvious when you get to what is causing the problem! (Either ferrous or non-ferrous should help the mechanic with the diagnosis).

Jun 05, 2017 | 2003 Honda CBR 600 RR

2 Answers

Putting the chain on


While the bike is in riding position loop the chain on the back sprocket. If this is a single speed bike then place as much of the chain as you can on the top of the front sprocket. Once it is partially threaded you can crank pedal around a half a turn and the chain will pop on the rest of the teeth.

Oct 10, 2012 | Mongoose 24 Inch XR75 Bike

1 Answer

When I take off in first gear every single time then there is a clicking sound that almost sounds like the chain is getting caught on something. It does not hold back from excelerating although the noise...


Thanks for the inquiry!
From your information I can't tell if this is a off-road bike or a street bike. With the extended swing arm I'm suspecting off-road. In either case it's very much same issues. You have two issues and we will deal with them separately.
Chain catching sound:
In low gear when you have maximum torque applied to your rear sprocket & wheel many times the primary sprocket (smallest one under the engine side cover) will slip and actually jump teeth. You indicated this is the third season, so it's seen a lot of wear. It would also explain that when you adjust/ tighten the chain tensioner the noise is gone as the front sprocket is not slipping in the chain. If this happens a couple of times the front sprocket is ruined. Pull the front sprocket cover and inspect the teeth. The teeth will be smooth and ground away if this has occurred. Most off-road riders go through 1 - 2 sprocket and chain sets per season with the abrasion form the sand and mud if they are serious about their riding. Replace front sprocket or both sprockets & chain.
Other possibilities are that you have lost your chain guide or the plastic wear plates inside the chain guide are gone and the chain is banging against the metallic sides or your swing arm making the chain jumping sound you have described. Replace the guide or wear plates to solve this.
Whooping sound on front of bike while coasting: This familiar sound appears to be related to your front wheel. The best way to test this is to set your bike on a bench, crate, or test stand so the front wheel/tire is off the floor/ground and spin the wheel. Your rim may be bent allowing the tire to rub against the fork tubes or front fender making the whooping sound. The engine noise drown's it out under power but noise is audible when coasting with the clutch in and engine idling. The simple fix is a spoke tightening and adjustment to properly true the wheel. You will hear if its a bearing or something else being rubbed against by a wooble or something out of round (run out) causing the whooping sound.
I hope I've provided you useful assistance and that this information allows you to make an informed decision as to how to proceed from here. Please be sure to vote on my response. I hope I've earned a good rating from you today.
Please post a comment if you need additional assistance so that I can help you further.
Happy cycling,
TF

Jun 03, 2011 | kawasaki ZX-6R Motorcycles

1 Answer

I hear a clunking fron the front chain sprocket . I think the chain needs adjusted on my 1995 kawaski zx1100.


Get the rear wheel off the ground and adjust the chain tension. When checking the tension spin the rear wheel and check that the tension does not go slack or get tighter. If the chain is riding up and down the sprocket teeth then the chain is stretched and needs to be replaced. This is the grinding/clunking noise you are hearing. If the sprockets are worn consider a chain and sprocket set, it can be a less expensive option than buying the parts separately.

Sep 19, 2010 | kawasaki ZZR 1100 Motorcycles

1 Answer

Drive chain goes loose and tight on back wheel turn


No.That was the problem.The chain and the sprockets needed to be renewed.
When you will take, the rear sprocket's base, off the axle check it's bearing.Just put your finger in and turn it slowly to see if it "locks" instantly.It will be nice if you renew it now that you disassembling the chain drive system.

Jun 07, 2009 | 2002 Honda CBR 600 F(4)i

1 Answer

Grinding noise


If the 'grinding' only happens when the bike is in motion, the problem is probably not inside the engine. Remove the chain and then start the motor. Put it in gear(s) and listen for the noise. No noise eliminates the engine as the problem.

Now lay the chain on the concrete and 'compress the chain in a straight line. Mark the end of the chain on the concrete. Now hold on to one end of the chain and stretch the chain. Did it stretch more than one inch? Replace it if it did. Look at the chain. is it rusted? Is it limber or do the links resist bending? Replace the chain if rusty and stiff.

While you are doing all this, check the rear wheel. Does it spin freely. Make any noise? Does the rear brake go on and off properly? Next check your sprockets. A bad sprocket will ruin a new chain. The ends of the teeth on the sprocket should be rounded. A worn sprocket shows pointed teeth. I have seen teeth so pointed they could pop a balloon. LOOK at both sides of the front and back sprockets. Are they rubbing against anything anywhere? Look at the chain, any rubbing? Is the tire rubbing on anything? Did the prior owner install heavier sprockets and bigger chain than stock sprockets and chain? > Check with the dealer.

Chances are you will find the problem if you do the above.
I hope you can rate this solution as a 'FixYa".

Mar 20, 2009 | 2005 Derbi Senda R 125 4T

1 Answer

Chain problem


I noticed a repetetive whirring coming from somewhere near the front sprocket- Or at least I'm pretty sure that's where it's coming from. It's not quite a grinding but it sounds like some sort of contact problem. I jacked up the bike, and the rear wheel spins freely in neutral except for a small area which seems to need just a *little* more force to spin around. Not sure if it's from the rear wheel or from whatever might be wrong up towards the front. The noise has an accompanying gritty feel, which rather reminds me of a bent rotor rubbing lightly at a certain point once per cycle on the brake pad. No amount of variation of pressure or speed in braking seems to affect the problem. There's no obvious performance issues, and I only hear it when I've got the clutch pulled in (probably because it's not loud enough to hear over the exhaust, not because it isn't happening). I ran the bike downhill in neutral and it still makes this noise. I lubed and adjusted the chain a day or so ago, and the adjustment notches are at the same point on each side. I had also ridden over a set of train rails cut deeply into the road, but I doubt that had much impact on anything. Any ideas?,Sounds like your chain may not have stretched evenly. You also may have it adjusted too tightly. You should always adjust the chain so that you have the specified slack at its tightest point. Do you know how many miles/KMs are on on this chain/sprocket set?,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2008 Beta RR 125 Enduro

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