Question about Suzuki GS 750 Motorcycles

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What is the right valve clearance for a 1979 suzuki gs850 i had to replace the head and cams but the shims are not in the head how do i check the clearance and at what cam position do i check them at

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  • Suzuki Master
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You need to put the shims in and fit the camswith all the caps and bolts on.
Then measure between the cam lobes and the shims with a feeler gauge, when the cam lobes high point is away from the shim bucket.
and write down all the measured clearances.
Then remove the cams and fit the correct thickness shims to get the clearance correct.
Fit the cams again and check, this can take a couple of tries if there were tight clearances in the first instance.
either fit the cam chain up each time to do both cams or make sure the pistons are only half way up the bore and do one cam at a time, to make sure the pistons and valves dont say hello.
cant help with exact clearance but a kawasaki 750 is 3-7 thou which will be pretty close as the shims let you adjust 2 thou at a time
ie if the measured clearance was 2 thou you would need a thinner shim to adjust the clearance to 4 thou

Posted on Jul 16, 2010

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Ok 1990 geo storm 1,6 litre dohc replaced water pump replaced 3 valves replaced head gaskets replaced timing belt car wont start any ideas?


90 Storm, must be in Canada, 1,6 (the comma tells me this)
the storm is a:
The car is really an Isuzu Impulse minus some of that car's more expensive features.
my guess is you drove the this 4EX1 engine until the cam belt slipped. yes> if yes you bent valves.????????????
so does compression exceed 150psi on all 4 cylinders now?
we use the cylinder leak down test in all DOHC .
if not , back to the drawing board.
if yes, the we check spark next, then try test fuel.
when did the engine last run , last week,month , year,?
who did your valves, a real machine shop or kid down the street.
a read shop pressure tests the head ,and warp checks it and
then makes sure the valves are ready for long service.
are the head bolts at 58 ft/lbs
did you use sealant on the 3 cap caps, per the FSM book.
if not , top end oiling will fail. and cams wrecked.

the 1.6l DOHC has no HLA's
the lash on valves must be checked, and this is corrected with SHIMS.

a pro machine shop does the for you,did they:?
when rebuilding engines, its best to read the factory service manual first. FSM so you know the special steps just for this engine.
ISUZU engine it is.



quote.
1.6L Twin Camshaft Engine
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Remove the cylinder head or valve cover.
  3. Position the No. 1 cylinder at TDC on its compression stroke.
The notch on the crankshaft pulley should align with the 0 degrees mark on the timing gear case. Make sure the rocker arms on the No. 1 cylinder are loose and the rockers on the No. 4 cylinder are tight. If not, turn the crankshaft one complete revolution and align the marks again.
  1. Using a feeler gauge, measure the clearance between the cam lobe and the selective shim on the intake and exhaust valves on the No. 1 cylinder, then the intake valves on the No. 2 cylinder and the exhaust valves on the No. 3 cylinder. Note readings.
  2. Rotate the crankshaft 360 degrees. Using a feeler gauge, measure the clearance between the cam lobe and the selective shim on the intake and exhaust valves on the No. 4 cylinder, then the intake valves on the No. 3 cylinder and the exhaust valves on the No. 2 cylinder. Note readings.
  3. The valve clearance obtained on the exhaust valves should be between 0.008-0.012 in. (0.20-0.30mm). If not, replace the selective shim by turning the camshaft lobe downward and installing tool J-38413-2 or J-38413-3 (valve lash spring spacer) between the camshaft journal and the cam lobe next to the selective shim. Turn cam lobe upward and remove the selective shim. Install new shim using the selective shim chart.
The rear camshaft bearing caps must be removed to remove the selective shim.
  1. The valve clearance obtained on the intake valves should be between 0.004-0.008 in. (0.10-0.20mm). If not, replace the selective shim by turning the camshaft lobe downward and installing tool J-38413-2 or J-38413-3 between the camshaft journal and the cam lobe next to the selective shim. Turn cam lobe upward and remove the selective shim. Install new shim using the selective shim chart.
  2. When the adjustment is completed, install the cylinder head covers and connect the battery negative cable. Start the engine and check for leaks.
end fsm quote.

see those 2 marks, and crank must be at TDC. mark first.

26196190-t50uqibptsz0ry0el5zdiz1k-1-0.jpg

May 16, 2016 | Geo Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I need to know the valve adjustment procedure and


Valve clearance ideal setting is 0.10mm however as ideal replacement size shims are not always available use tolerance 0.05 to 0.2mm inlet and exhaust Procedure remove tappet cover rotate motor to tdc compression (inlet valve lobe pointing to rear wheel and exaust lobe to front wheel) measure clearance if no clearance depress cam bucket hold down by wedging a screwdriver or suitable tool (allen key) between cam bucket and cam remove shim measure with micrometer an relace with a shim 0.15 thinner depress valve remove wedge and measure clearance (if any) repeat procedure 4 each cylinder if clearance to large replace shim with a thicker one till clearance is in spec

Jul 20, 2010 | 1981 Suzuki GS 750 L

1 Answer

2003 yamaha 250yfm valves are noisey and started


Valves are adjusted by changing the the shims to thicker or thiner ones.
measure all the clearances and write them down, remove the cams and remove the cam buckets of the ones that need adjustment. Note the sizes of the shims removed( it is etched onto them) and replace with different thickness shims to bring them back into tollerence.

Make some marks and notes on the cam timing before removing cams,even take a photo(or that will be your next question) .
valve clearances usually close up( dont get noisy) and valve clearances wont make it smoke, so there may be more maintenance to do, like a cam chain and rings. Im not certain about a yfm, but you posted with a picture of a 2 stroke which doesnt have valves to adjust

Jun 20, 2010 | 2003 Yamaha YZ 250

1 Answer

Whats the cam shims settings and valve clearance settings please for 1990 gsf 400 import


Intake: .004-.006"
Exhaust: .006-.008"

There are no specific settings for shims. Each valve is a little different and the different thickness shims are used to get the clearance in spec. This also changes as the engine wears. If you need any, the shims will have to be purchased at the dealer.

*Help me out. Rate me!

May 21, 2010 | 1991 Suzuki GSF 400 Bandit

1 Answer

Noise in motor


If there are no adjusting nuts , means there are shims, You will need to measure all clearances, and mark on a note pad, then remove cams, and remove cam buckets on the ones out of adjustment.
Pushing on each valve stem is a small round disc, it will have a number etched on it indicating thickness, get some more shims the sizes required to bring the clearances back in tollerence, usually only one or two sizes thicker or thinner, and put back together.
Turn motor over by hand, and check you have the right clearances
Do not mix up buckets, carefully take note of valve timing before dissassembly, lots of notes, white out pen marks on the cams, perhaps a photo or two.

Valves clearances normally tighten up, so it may be cam chain noise, even if it appears there is still some tension left

Apr 24, 2010 | 2004 kawasaki ZX-6R

1 Answer

How hard is itto check and replace valve shims and


you check the clearance with a feeler gauge under the cam lobes, if they are out of tollerance, there is a special tool to get them out and change, or you have to remove the cams, mark everything and take notes of clearances and the numbers on the shims removed

Apr 20, 2010 | 1995 Yamaha XJ 600 Diversion S-N

3 Answers

It will not start and it backfire after valve adjustment. did i put the cams back the wrong way?


did u hav piston @tdc power stroke-valves shud slightly clic with ur hand after ajust-mite hav performed it at exhaust stroke! let me know

Jan 26, 2010 | 2002 Yamaha YZ 426 F

1 Answer

I have an 04 RMZ 250 I just re-shimmed the valves and put a new piston in and bike was running great started first kick road it all over the street and golf course. went on ONE ride in the heat and...


sounds like maybe valves were shimmed too tight,check service manual for clearances...better a little loose than too tight,can cause alot of damage to cam & head,be careful!!

Sep 29, 2009 | 2004 Suzuki RM-Z 250

1 Answer

Valve timing check


Chain drive. Unless the engine's been apart, why would the cam/valve timing change?
Valve clearances are another matter, and unless you want to remove the camshafts, get a mechanic who has the proper Suzuki tool to do them for you. You can measure the clearances, but the shims are between the cam lobe and the valve bucket, and the special tool holds the bucket down whilst changing to a thicker or thinner shim.

Apr 15, 2009 | Suzuki Aerio Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

I need to adjust the valves on my Suzuki rm-Z 250. Can you tell me how?


To adjust your valves you will need a few standard tools and most importantly a set of feeler gauges. You can buy these at any automotive store. The first step is removing the tank and valve cover to gain access to the valve train. You will see both the intake and exhaust cams plus the tops of the valves. This is where you will be measuring with the feeler gauge. The next thing would be to rotate the motor to top dead center. You will need to remove both inspection covers that are on the side of your ignition cover. This will give you access to the timing marks and to the bolt that allows you to turn the motor over.

Check in your manual as to what direction to turn the motor over. You do not want to turn the motor over in the wrong direction. Turn the motor over looking into the inspection (top) hole. You will notice a mark on the fly wheel. When you see this mark come around, look up at the cams. There should be two punch marks on the cam gears that line up with the gasket surface towards the outside of the head. At this point you should be at top dead center compression. Check the lobes of the cam, they should not be touching the valve buckets. If they are touching the valve buckets, this means that you are 180 degrees out of time. Rotate the motor 180 degrees and then start to measure.

After you measure the clearance between the cam lobe and the valve bucket, you will want to write that down. You will then need to check your numbers against the spec's provided in your service manual. If you are outside the specified range, you will need to remove your cams and replace the shims. There should be a chart in your manual that will help you to decide what shims you will need to bring you within the safe range. When dealing with the KXF250 or the RMZ 250, you want to make sure you use the correct shims. There are two types that will fit these bikes, but only one is the correct shim. Shims come both forged and sintered. They look the same until you put them under a magnifying glass, then the difference is very clear. The forged shims have a smooth surface, while the sintered shims have very small cavities. Using the sintered shims will prematurely wear the coating off of the valve stem. This will shorten valve life and cause the valves to go out of adjustment sooner.

Now, after replacing the shims, all that is left is to reassemble your machine. Pay closer attention to the instructions in your owners manual. Always double check your cam timing with what is recommended in the manual. Do not start your bike without turning the motor over by hand first. If you feel it is unusually hard to turn over or it will not turn over, you probably are off on your cam timing. Once again, do not try and start the bike. Go back and retime your cams.

Nov 25, 2008 | 2005 Suzuki RM-Z 250

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