Question about 1974 Yamaha DT 360

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How does the ignition system work on a 1969 CT1? I have no spark but the coil only has one wire and it seems to be a ground?

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Http://www.cmsnl.com/yamaha-ct1-1969_model8325/partslist/
If the coil only has one wire (apart from HT lead to sparkplug) it will plug into the loom to the same color wire with the appropriate male or female connection. The hard mounting of the coil to the frame provides the ground in this case. This provides the continuity of the circuit from the contact breaker (points) behind the flywheel magneto. The site above has all the sections of your bike in exploded views with all part names. Cheers.

Posted on May 26, 2010

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1 Answer

No spark from coil to distrubuter


Disconnect the ignition coil output wire at the distributor cap.
Connect a spark plug to the end of the ignition coil output wire which you just disconnected.
Connect a ground wire to the threaded portion of the spark plug.
Disconnect the ignition coil ground wire from the negative terminal on the coil (Green Wire).
Connect one end of a ground wire to the ignition coil negative terminal.
Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
Tap the other end of the ignition coil ground wire jumper on an good grounding point (for example the battery negative terminal) and look for sparks at the spark plug that correspond to the frequency of your tapping of the ground wire.
If you have a good spark at the spark plug, the ignition coil is good.
If you don't get a good spark, check for approximately 12 VDC from the coil positive terminal (black wire) to ground with the ignition switch in the ON position. You should also get approximately 12 VDC from the coil negative terminal (Green wire) to ground
Ignition Coil Resistance Check

In addition to the test above, you may elect to perform an ignition coil resistance check as confirmation of the coil's condition.

Check the ignition coil primary coil resistance by connecting an ohmmeter between the positive (Black wire) and negative (Green wire) terminals on the coil. The resistance should be 0.4 to 0.6 ohms.
Check the ignition coil secondary coil resistance by connecting an ohmmeter between the coil output terminal and the ignition coil negative terminal. The resistance should be 5000 to 7200 ohms.

You may have a bad coil or bad ground or wire connection

Jan 23, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

6v magneti marelli ignition coil wiring / terminals.


the blank one and you can check this out after the bike is running or at least when you get the coil to fire by placing the lead part of a pencil in the gap between the spark plug or a good ground and the gap between the pencil and the spark plug wire so you can see the spark jump to the plug or ground from the plug wire and if the spark flash is on the wire side of the pencil the coil the coil is wired with wrong polarity if the system is a positive ground system. The coil will work no matter what the polarity ie no matter which of the terminals you connect to power and which you connect to ground, the only difference will be a somewhat weaker spark if electron flow is reversed from what it should be i.e. if it is from negative or ground to positive on a negative ground system or as on some older British ignition systems from positive to negative on a positive ground system. The flash will appear on the side of the pencil lead away from the current flow i.e. the flash will occur as the current leaves the pencil lead. Hope this helps.

Dec 10, 2014 | Moto Guzzi Motorcycles

1 Answer

2005 grand am wont start


see this steps and fix it. God bless you
When the engine cranks normally but won't start, you need to check ignition, fuel and compression. Ignition is easy enough to check with a spark tester or by positioning a plug wire near a good ground. No spark? The most likely causes would be a failed ignition module, distributor pickup or cranshaft position sensor CKP

A tool such as an Ignition System Simulator can speed the diagnosis by quickly telling you if the ignition module and coil are capable of producing a spark with a simulated timing input signal. If the simulated signal generates a spark, the problem is a bad distributor pickup or crankshaft position sensor. No spark would point to a bad module or coil. Measuring ignition coil primary and secondary resistance can rule out that component as the culprit.
Module problems as well as pickup problems are often caused by loose, broken or corroded wiring terminals and connectors. Older GM HEI ignition modules are notorious for this. If you are working on a distributorless ignition system with a Hall effect crankshaft position sensor, check the sensor's reference voltage (VRef) and ground. The sensor must have 5 volts or it will remain permanently off and not generate a crank signal (which should set a fault code). Measure VRef between the sensor power supply wire and ground (use the engine block for a ground, not the sensor ground circuit wire). Don't see 5 volts? Then check the sensor wiring harness for loose or corroded connectors. A poor ground connection will have the same effect on the sensor operation as a bad VRef supply. Measure the voltage drop between the sensor ground wire and the engine block. More than a 0.1 voltage drop indicates a bad ground connection. Check the sensor mounting and wiring harness.
If a Hall effect crank sensor has power and ground, the next thing to check would be its output. With nothing in the sensor window, the sensor should be "on" and read 5 volts (VRef). Measure the sensor D.C. output voltage between the sensor signal output wire and ground (use the engine block again, not the ground wire). When the engine is cranked, the sensor output should drop to zero every time the shutter blade, notch, magnetic button or gear tooth passes through the sensor. No change in voltage would indicate a bad sensor that needs to be replaced.
If the primary side of the ignition system seems to be producing a trigger signal for the coil but the voltage is not reaching the plugs, a visual inspection of the coil tower, distributor cap, rotor and plug wires should be made to identify any defects that might be preventing the spark from reaching its intended destination.


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Oct 16, 2012 | 2005 Pontiac Grand Am

1 Answer

SKIPPING PROBLEM . SPARK PLUGS & WIRES HAS BEEN DONE. THERE'S NO 12 VOLTS AT THE COIL CONNECTOR PLUG WITH THE KEY ON. LYMAN


Sound like a ground problem; the fastest way to identify the Power and Ground Circuits is using a wiring diagram. If you don't have one you'll have to find out by trial and error as you probe each circuit.

The power circuit is tested with the Key On and Engine Off. Place one end of your multimeter or Test Light on the Battery Negative Terminal and with the other end, probe the Power Circuit. Turn the Key to the Run position. If the Power Circuit is OK, the Multimeter will show 12 Volts or the Test Light will light up. Here are the possible results:
* You got 12 Volts on the Power Circuit
Good, this is a good sign. The next step is to check the Ground Circuit of the Coil on Plug connector that you're testing.

* No Power in only one Ignition Coil
Without 12 Volts, the Coil-on-Plug Ignition Coil will not work, thus you have just eliminated that specific Ignition Coil as the source of the fault. Replacing the Ignition Coil with a new one will only be a waste of time and money since, without Power the new one will not Spark.
Since the Power Circuit is shared by all of the coils on the majority of Coil-on-Plug Ignition Systems. The most likely cause will be an open short in that Ignition Coil's Power Circuit.
You'll have to consult your Repair Manual's wiring diagrams to make sure how everything is wired up.
After repairing the short, re-do the Spark Test to verify the Ignition Coil is now working.

* No Power at any Ignition Coils
The fuse or relay that supplies this voltage is blown or BAD.
You'll have to consult your Repair Manual's wiring diagrams to see where this fuse and/or relay is located and replace as necessary.
After replacing the blown fuse or the defective relay. Retest the Ignition Coil.

Them, the Ground Circuit is tested with the Key On or Off. It doesn't matter because this is a Chassis Ground. Place one end of your multimeter or Test Light on the Battery Positive Terminal and with the other end, probe the Ground Circuit. If the Ground Circuit is OK, the Multimeter will show 12 Volts or the Test Light will light up.

* You got Ground
Good, now the next step is to verify that the Coil-on-Plug Ignition Coil is receiving the Triggering Signal. This info belongs to the next section of this article.

* No Ground in only one Ignition Coil
Without this Ground, the Coil-on-Plug Ignition Coil will not work, thus you have just eliminated that specific Ignition Coil as the source of the fault. Replacing the Ignition Coil with a new one will only be a waste of time and money since, without Ground the new one will not Spark.
Since the Ground Circuit is shared by all of the coils on the majority of Coil-on-Plug Ignition Systems. The most likely cause will be an open short in that Ignition Coil's Ground Circuit.
You'll have to consult your Repair Manual's wiring diagrams to make sure how everything is wired up.
After repairing the short, re-do the Spark Test to verify the Ignition Coil is now working.

* No Ground at any Ignition Coils
This usually happens thru' human error in most cases and is a very rare thing. Usually the engine was replaced and this ground was not re-attached.
You can Ground this circuit with a jumper wire. Jumpering to Ground just one Coil-on-Plug Ignition Coil should provide Ground to all of them (consult your Repair Manual's Wiring Diagrams to be sure).
With this jumper wire to Ground attached, crank the vehicle.
If in fact the Ground Circuit does have an open short, this (the jumper wire to Ground) should make the vehicle start, or at least get the Ignition Coil to Spark.
Repair the open short and retest for Spark or retry starting the vehicle.


Hope this helps. Keep us updated.

Aug 19, 2011 | 2003 Chrysler Town & Country

1 Answer

I just acquired a 1969 benelli buzzer and it doesn't have spark so I am trying to figure out the wiring from the magneto to the coil. I also don't know what the fuel mix ratio is for the bike...


Hi, Cole_bliven if you have a CKP sensor it needs compression to send the correct signal to the ICM/ECM, make sure both spark plugs are in heads and use a grounded third plug to check for spark or hold spark plug cable close to spark plug in the head. If still not getting spark the usual suspects are:
1. Fouled spark plugs.
2. Discharged battery, check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check the battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
3. Loose connection at ignition coil or plug between ignition sensor and module.
4. Spark plug cables in bad condition, shorting / leaking, spark plug cable connections loose.
5. Faulty ignition coil or ignition / electronic module
6. Failed CKP, CMP, or BAS sensor.
7. Faulty ignition switch.
8. Security alarm failing to disarm needs reset
For more information about your issue, please visit the websites below. Good luck and have a nice day.
Chinese scooter no spark kit
Madass No Spark Test Part 1 wmv
The Ultimate GY6 Starter Ignition Troubleshooting Tutorial BENELLI MINIBIKE
https://www.hagerty.com/price-guide/1969-Benelli-Buzzer


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1 Answer

1969 Yamaha CT1 175 wiring diagram


Hi, Jhnarnold for this scenario you will need your service/owners manual if you can't find the first and best tool you ever bought for your Yamaha, despair not, for a mere $28 you can download another one. For more information about your issue and valuable "Free" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
1969 Yamaha CT1 175 wiring diagram Google Search
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Feb 12, 2011 | 1972 Yamaha DT 360

3 Answers

1989 astro van turns over will not start seems not getting fuil gas tank full


#1 NEED TO VERIFY SPARK AT SPARK PLUGS # 2 CK FUEL PRESSURE AT SCHRADER VALVE ON FUEL RAIL ,,PRESSURE DEPENDS ON TYPE ENGINE ....IF NO SPARK AT SPARK PLUGS CHECK SPARK FROM COIL WIRE , IF NO SPARK AT COIL ,CHECK VOLTAGE TO IGNITION COIL SHOULD BE 12 VOLTS, IF NO VOLTAGE AT COIL ( KEY ON ) CHECK FUSES THEN IGHITION SWITCH. IF NO FUEL PRESSURE AND FUEL PUMP RUNS REPLACE PUMP .. CK VOLTAGE TO FUEL PUMP WHILE CRANKING . CK USING PUMP GROUND WIRE AT THE PUMP CONNECTOR THIS WILL PROVE GROUND ALSO. USE TEST LIGHT TO VERIFY

Aug 07, 2010 | 1989 Chevrolet Astro Cargo

1 Answer

Its a 1973 yamaha CT1 175 There is no list for it


I haven't worked on that bike in 30 years, but as I recall, the black wire goes to the points. The coil grounds via the mounting bolts.

Jun 20, 2010 | 2003 Yamaha YZ 250

1 Answer

Car cranks but wont start


ENGINE CRANKS BUT WILL NOT START
When the engine cranks normally but won't start, you need to check ignition, fuel and"http://www.aa1car.com/library/compression.htm". Ignition is easy enough to check with a spark tester or by positioning a plug wire near a good ground. No spark? The most likely causes would be a failed ignition module, distributor pickup or "http://www.aa1car.com/library/crank_sensors.htm".
A tool such as an Ignition System Simulator can speed the diagnosis by quickly telling you if the ignition module and coil are capable of producing a spark with a simulated timing input signal. If the simulated signal generates a spark, the problem is a bad distributor pickup or crankshaft position sensor. No spark would point to a bad module or coil. Measuring ignition coil primary and secondary resistance can rule out that component as the culprit.
Module problems as well as pickup problems are often caused by loose, broken or corroded wiring terminals and connectors. Older HEI ignition modules are notorious for this. If you are working on a distributorless ignition system with a Hall effect crankshaft position sensor, check the sensor's reference voltage (VRef) and ground. The sensor must have 5 volts or it will remain permanently off and not generate a crank signal (which should set a fault code). Measure VRef between the sensor power supply wire and ground (use the engine block for a ground, not the sensor ground circuit wire). Don't see 5 volts? Then check the sensor wiring harness for loose or corroded connectors. A poor ground connection will have the same effect on the sensor operation as a bad VRef supply. Measure the voltage drop between the sensor ground wire and the engine block. More than a 0.1 voltage drop indicates a bad ground connection. Check the sensor mounting and wiring harness.
If a Hall effect crank sensor has power and ground, the next thing to check would be its output. With nothing in the sensor window, the sensor should be "on" and read 5 volts (VRef). Measure the sensor D.C. output voltage between the sensor signal output wire and ground (use the engine block again, not the ground wire). When the engine is cranked, the sensor output should drop to zero every time the shutter blade, notch, magnetic button or gear tooth passes through the sensor. No change in voltage would indicate a bad sensor that needs to be replaced.
If the primary side of the ignition system seems to be producing a trigger signal for the coil but the voltage is not reaching the plugs, a visual inspection of the coil tower, distributor cap, rotor and plug wires should be made to identify any defects that might be preventing the spark from reaching its intended destination.----
thanks for using fixya,please do rate the solution positively.

Feb 17, 2010 | 1996 Acura RL

1 Answer

Need a wiring diagram for a 1969 Ford F250.


there should be a slot for each wire on back of ignition play with them till you get it right cant hurt anything

Jan 14, 2010 | Ford F-250 Cars & Trucks

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