Question about Harley Davidson FLHT Electra Glide Standard Motorcycles

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Trying to remove front primary chain sprocket on 92 electra glide. how do i lock down the chain so i can break loose the bolt on the sprocket

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Have some one help you put on the rear brake

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Drive belt installation 2000 electreaglid classic


Remove the rear wheel and then remove the primary chain, the clutch, the engine compensating sprocket, and the chain adjuster as an assembly and then remove the primary chaincase housing. Support the bike under the rear fork and engine and then remove the pivot shaft and the spacer THEN slip the belt off the transmission sprocket and then install a new drive belt over the transmission sprocket and proceed to reinstall the pivot shaft and spacer after which you can remove the support holding the engine and rear fork and install the primary chaincase housing, the primary chain assembly and the primary chaincase cover and fill the primary chaincase with lubricant up to the bottom of the clutch diaphragm spring. Install the rear wheel and adjust the belt to the proper deflection dimension and confirm that the rear wheel is properly aligned side to side.

Jul 08, 2014 | 2005 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

How to replace a clutch drum on an 09 Electra glide


Pull primary cover and then pull primary chain adjuster and compensator and clutch and chain out and then remove six metric bolts and remove clutch pressure plate and discs and then replace hub and bearing assembly and replace clutch disc and pressure plate etc as you took them apart. Might not cost that much more to simply buy a whole new clutch assembly and have it all new. You will need a bar to lock the primary and compensator together when you loosen and when you tighten the retaining fasteners.

Tighten compensating sprocket bolt to 100 ft-lbs (135.7 Nm) and then reverse the drive locking tool and loosen the bolt one full turn and then reverse the locking tool again and tighten the bolt to a final torque of 140 ft-lbs (190.0 Nm). Install the locking tool again and tighten the clutch hub mainshaft nut to 70-80 ft-lbs (94.9-108.5 Nm).
After the compensator and clutch fasteners have been torqued Install the primary chain tensioner and tighten the fasteners to 15-19 ft-lbs (20.3-25.8 Nm).

May 18, 2014 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

2 Answers

Do you have any idea how to check the chain adjustment on a 2002 Dyna Low


hi,

Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.

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May 14, 2011 | 2000 Harley Davidson FXDWG Dyna Wide Glide

1 Answer

Aligning the valve timing mareks except twincam engine


Timing Chain, Sprockets, Front Cover and Seal REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION Crankshaft Damper and Front Oil Seal
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Negative battery cable
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Cooling fans
    • Crankshaft pulley and damper, using a holding fixture as shown
    • Front crankshaft seal Fig. 1: Crankshaft pulley removal tool - V8 9301jg12.gif
    To install:
  3. Install oil seal replacer tool JD-235 to the oil seal. Use the nut and bolt provided with the tool to fully seat the seal to the timing cover.
  4. For dampers which DO NOT utilize a spit locking ring:
    1. Apply a thin, even coating of Loctite® 648 to the damper bore. Do not apply it to the end faces or to the crankshaft.
    2. Install the crankshaft damper onto the crankshaft. Wipe off any Loctite that has squeezed out from the front of the damper.
    3. Install the locking tool to the damper. Tighten the bolt to 59 ft. lbs. (80 Nm), plus an 80 degree turn.
  5. For dampers which utilize a spit locking ring:
    1. Install a new O-ring seal to the damper.
    2. Install the crankshaft damper.
    3. Apply petroleum jelly to the damper bore and O-ring seal.
    4. Install the damper onto the crankshaft.
    5. Install the split locking ring onto the crankshaft, inside the center bore of the damper.
    6. Install the locking tool to the damper.
    7. Tighten the damper bolt to 266-285 ft. lbs. (364-386 Nm).
    8. Remove the locking tool from the damper.
  6. Install or connect the following:
    • Cooling fans
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Negative battery cable
  7. Start the engine and check for leaks.
Timing Cover
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Drain the cooling system.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Negative battery cable
    • Upper radiator hose
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Water pump pulley
    • Accessory drive belt tensioner
    • Idler pulley
    • Crankshaft damper
    • Engine appearance covers
    • Mass Air Flow (MAF) meter
    • Air intake assembly
    • Ignition coils
    • Canister purge valve
    • Valve covers
    • Variable Valve Timing (VVT) solenoids
    • Engine harness retaining clips
    • Timing cover
    To install: Fig. 2: Sealant application points - V8 9301jg23.gif
    Fig. 3: Timing cover torque sequence-V8 9307jg01.gif

  4. Apply sealant to the 8 joints on the engine face as shown.
  5. Install or connect the following:
    • Timing cover with new seals. Tighten the bolts in sequence to 96-120 inch lbs. (11-13 Nm).
    • Engine harness retaining clips
    • VVT solenoids
    • Valve covers
    • Canister purge valve
    • Ignition coils
    • Air intake assembly
    • MAF meter
    • Engine appearance covers
    • Crankshaft damper
    • Idler pulley
    • Accessory drive belt tensioner
    • Water pump pulley
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Upper radiator hose
    • Negative battery cable
  6. Fill the cooling system.
  7. Start the engine and check for leaks.
Timing Chain 6 CYLINDER
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Negative battery cable
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Valve cover
    • Timing chain cover
    • Variable Valve Timing (VVT) sensor
    • Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor
  3. Rotate the crankshaft until the triangular arrow indent on the driveplate is visible through the access hole.
  4. Install the Crankshaft Setting Peg JD 216 into the CKP sensor location.
  5. Install the Camshaft Locking tool JD 215 on the camshafts.
  6. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Camshaft sprocket mounting bolt by loosening it
    • VVT mounting bolt by loosening it
    • Camshaft Locking tool JD 215
    • Primary timing chain tensioner and backing plate
    • Primary timing chain guide
    • VVT unit and exhaust camshaft sprocket
    • Secondary timing chain tensioner and guide
    NOTE: Keep all valvetrain components in order for assembly. To install:
  7. Prepare the timing chain tensioners for installation by using a paperclip or other wire to unseat the check valves and compressing the pistons into their bores.
  8. Install or connect the following:
    • Secondary timing chain guide. Tighten the bolt to 89-124 inch lbs. (10-14 Nm).
    • Secondary timing chain tensioner. Tighten the bolt to 89-124 inch lbs. (10-14 Nm).
    • VVT, secondary timing chain and exhaust cam sprocket
    • Primary timing chain
    • Primary timing chain guide. Tighten the bolt to 10-12 ft. lbs. (13-16 Nm).
    • Primary timing chain tensioner and backing plate. Tighten the bolts to 89-124 inch lbs. (10-14 Nm).
    • Primary timing chain slack, eliminate it by placing a wedge between the primary timing chain tensioner and the guide shoe
    • Secondary timing chain by applying counterclockwise force to the exhaust camshaft sprocket. Fig. 4: Apply force in a counterclockwise direction when tightening the sprocket mounting bolts - 6 cylinder 9301jg03.gif

    • Exhaust and intake VVT sprocket bolts. Tighten them to 85-92 ft. lbs. (115-125 Nm).
  9. Remove the tools and wedges.
  10. Install or connect the following:
    • CKP sensor
    • VVT sensor
    • Coolant outlet pipe
    • ECT sensor connector
    • Radiator and heater hoses
    • Timing chain cover
    • Valve cover
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Negative battery cable
  11. Fill the cooling system.
  12. Start the engine and check for leaks.
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Jan 28, 2011 | 1999 Jaguar XK8

1 Answer

Removal of inner primary cover


For the cover you may have to loosen your shifter linkage to be able to remove it from the bike depending on what model you have
As for the inner primary you'll have to take off the clutch the front & rear primary sprockets and chain. You can loosen the bolts to both sprockets,then loosen the chain tensioner.
Slide the front & rear sprocket & chain off with the clutch still attached. leave them together and set it aside as one big unit.
The inner primary has bolts with bent washer tabs. Bend the tabs flat so you can remove the bolts.
Thre is a lock ring around the transmission shaft that holds the inner primary on too. Remove that with lock-ring plier.
Depending on your model, you may have to remove the rotor/flywheel first before the inner primary comes off.
Don't for get to put a new engine o-ring back on the front hole of the inner primary when re-installing.

Dec 03, 2010 | Harley Davidson FXST Softail Standard...

1 Answer

Looking for step by step instructions on replacing a stator on a 2001 FXDWG


To replace the stator on your Wide Glide, you'll have to pull the outer primary cover off. This means drain the oil and remove the outer primary cover. Then, you'll need a wrench to remove the large nut on the engine compensator sprocket. You'll probably need a "locking bar" to wedge between the sprokets to lock the assembly from turning. Remove the snap ring in the center of the clutch assembly, remove the clutch release plate that is held in by the snap ring. Inside the clutch is a nut that has LEFT HANDED THREADS, remove this nut. Take the nut off the primary chain adjuster. Grab the clutch assembly and the engine compensator sprocket and lift these parts and the chain off as a unit.

Now, there are some thin spacers that go behind the sprocket shaft extension and a 0.090" thick spacer that goes behind the rotor. Do not mix these shims up. You'll see two holes in the rotor. I use two 5/16" bolts about three inches long to get the rotor off. Stick them in the holes just slightly, squeeze the outer ends towards each other and pull the rotor off. The magnets are pretty strong. The stator is held on by four small Torx head bolts and there's nylon retainer with two small screws that hold the plug in. Retorque the four Torx head screws to 40 inch pounds of torque with a Loctite #242 blue or equivalent thread locking compound on them. Reassembly is the reverse of the assembly. The torque on the clutch assembly nut (mainshaft nut) is 60-70 foot pounds with one line of Loctite #271 red locktite, (remember this nut has left-handed threads) and the engine compensator sprocket torques to 150-165 foot pounds with two lines of Loctite #271 red. Adjust the primary chain so that the up and down play in the center of the top run is 3/4" to 7/8" cold. Outer primary bolts torque to 100 inch pounds.

For a better explanation, you'll need an OEM service manual.

Good Luck
Steve

Oct 24, 2010 | 2001 Harley Davidson FXDWG Dyna Wide Glide

1 Answer

Excessive noise in primary,probable causes?


When is the last time you checked the adjustment of your primary chain? It should be adjusted to where you have 3/4 to 7/8 inch up and down play when checked in the middle of the upper section of the chain when COLD. I like to set the chain at the 3/4 inch setting if possible. As the engine/transmission heats up, the chain will tighten up. If the chain is too loose, it will rub the top of the inside of the inner primary cover when you back off on the throttle.

Also, you didn't say how many miles your bike has on it. You could need to replace the nylon shoe on the primary chain adjuster mechanism if it's worn badly. Also, I've seen a lot of spring cups on the compensator sprocket go bad. Remove the outer primary cover and try to turn this cup with you hands. If you can turn it by hand, you probably need to replace it. This will make a "clop, clop, clop" type noise when idling. While in the primary, check the torque on the engine sprocket nut. It should be 150-165 foot pounds. You will need a primary locking tool to check this as the engine will turn over before you reach that torque level.

Feb 09, 2010 | 2003 Harley Davidson FLHT Electra Glide...

1 Answer

1982 harley sportster xlh . died comming down a hill . lost compression . no spark but have electric. pistons not moving. will not push start. help trying to find a manual to see engine break down and...


Sounds like you have lost something in your primary. If you lost say the primary chain, the starter wouldn't work nor could you push start the bike. In other words, you cannot get the engine to turn over. I'd pull the primary cover off and have a look in there. Those bikes were notorious for the engine sprocket nut coming loose.

Drain the oil out of the primay by removing the drain plug underneath the primary. While you're under the primary, loosen the lock nut on the primary chain adjuster and back the adjuster out a bit. Now, remove the large round clutch adjuster access plug and remove the small spring and locknut. Remove all the bolts around the primary cover. As you remove the outer primary cover, you'll have to turn the clutch adjuster screw inwards until the cover comes free. Now the cover should be off.

If you have something wrong in the primary, it should be obvious. The chain will be loose because you have backed off on the adjuster to get the outer primary off. Look for a loose engine sprocket or something wrong with the clutch assembly. If you need anymore help, come back here to repost or contact me directly at wd4ity@bellsouth.net

Nov 07, 2009 | Harley Davidson XLH 883 Sportster...

1 Answer

How to replace primary chain on a 1999 softail custom


This will be quite an involved process, just to let you know. If you have a motorcycle lift or can borrow one it makes things so much easier.
The first thing to do is drain all the oil out of your primary. Next remove the bolts from the primary, noting which ones went where as there are short and long bolts. Next under neath the primary is the adjustment for the chain tensioner. Loosen the jam nut, then unscrew the adjuster. Remove the primary cover gently, you may have to tap on it with a rubber hammer to get it loose. While removing be careful not to pull the 2 pins out of the inner primary, the are for alignment. Now you need to remove all the gasket material from the primary and the inner primary. Remove the retaining clip off you clutch hub. This is the one right where your clutch adjustment is. Once removed just pull your adjuster nut and adjuster threaded shaft out. Okay here is the fun part, in order to remove the chain you must remove both the front sproket and the rear clutch basket, etc. But before you can do this you must lock the chain from moving, Harley makes a tool for this or if you are very careful and I do mean very careful, you can take a large screwdriver and wrap it in an old T-shirt, place the wrapped screwdriver between the chain and top of the clutch sprocket. You must always lock the top of the chain NEVER the bottom. Okay the nut on your clutch assembly is reverse threaded, so while the chain is locked you turn the nut clockwise to loosen. Once lossened go to the front sprocket and repeat process, this nut is standard thread, and on tightly. Loosen this nut, then go to your chain tensioner and loosen the nut holding it on, and lower it as far as possible. remove both the nuts from the front sprocket and clutch. On the front sproket there are some items you just pull off the shaft and leave the sprocket. Note the order of removing. Okay now pull both the front sprocket and the clutch off at the same time avoiding the chain tensioner.
Now this is just advice not a must do. Inspect your sprockets for wear, if they need replacing by all means replace them...yes they are expensive...so are tow trucks! Also on some 1999-2000 models the OEM chain tension could and would fail, this doesn't make for a bad day, but a REALLY bad week! My point for about a $100 you can replace the OEM tension with the Harley auto adjusting one.
Now you are ready to replace the chain and put the sprockets back on. You should use the red loctite(sp?) on both nuts, your front nut should be tighten to 150-165 ft./lbs and the rear 50-65 ft./lbs check that number for the rear before you put it back together I may be incorrect. Once you have those tightened up put your chain tension back in the proper position. Now would be a good time to make the adjustment. Place you clutch retaining plate and adjuster, then put the retain clip back in, adjust clutch. Replace gasket for primary, install primary, remove inspection plate, put oil in, bolt plate back on.
Start it up, check for leaks, all cool, get some time in the wind.
Hope this helps,

JP

Aug 27, 2009 | Harley Davidson FXST Softail Standard...

2 Answers

How to install hd self adjusting primary chain tensioner in O4 Ultra.



Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.


install-hd-self-adjusting-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-0.jpg

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Mar 30, 2009 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

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