Question about 1998 Honda CB 500

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Front brake outside pad is worn out but the inside pad is hardly worn. I have ordered new pads but is there an adjustment I can make to balance the wear?

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You will need to remove and disassemble the calipers to clean them out. After removing the caliper pistons, and the caliper seals you need to clean out the grooves that the seals sit in, this may require a pick to scrape the crud from behind the seals. Install new seals when you put the calipers back together. Do not use any type of cleaner in the brake parts except brake cleaner or denatured alcohol. The use of any petroleum based cleaners will contaminate the system and cause the seals to swell up and be destroyed.

Posted on May 09, 2010

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1 Answer

How to replace rear brake pads 2002 softtail ?


If present, remove right saddlebag.
Remove the rear master cylinder reservoir cap. As the pistons are pushed back into the caliper, fluid level may rise more than 1/8 in. (3.2 mm). You may have to remove fluid to allow for this.
Loosen, but do not remove, both pad pins (12 pt/0.25 in.).
Pry the inside pad back. Use steady pressure to prevent scoring the brake disc. Pry between the pad and the brake disc in order to push the caliper pistons back into their bores.
Once the pistons have been fully retracted into their bores, pull pad pins part way until the inside pads drop free. Note the pad's original orientation for replacement purposes.
Install pad with two tabs on the inboard side of the rear caliper.
Install new inside brake pad using the same orientation as the pad previously removed. Curved portion of pad must face upward.
Install pad pins until the pins snap into place with an audible click. Do not fully tighten at this time.
Pump brake pedal lever to move inside pistons out until they contact inside brake pads.
Pry the outside pad back. Pry between the pad and the brake disc in order to push the caliper pistons back into their bores.
Verify that inside pads are captured between brake disc and pistons. Completely remove pad pins to free outside brake pad. Note the pad's original orientation for replacement purposes.
Install new outside brake pad using the same orientation as the pad previously removed. If the inside pad moved during the previous step, reinstall. Curved portion of pad must face upward.
Install both pad pins through holes in inner and outer
brake pads. Tighten to 180-200 in-lbs (20.3-22.6 Nm).

Jun 03, 2014 | 2003 Harley Davidson FXST Softail Standard

1 Answer

Rear brake replacement 2003 FLHT


The minimum brake disc thickness is stamped on the side of the disc. Maximum brake disc lateral runout or warpage is 0.008 inch (0.2 mm) when measured near the outside diameter.
Replace brake pads if the friction material above the backing plate on either pad is 0.04 inch (1.02 mm) thick or less.

To remove the rear brake pads begin by removing the right side saddlebag, loosen both pad pins but do not remove them or installation of the new pads will be more difficult than needs to be, remove the rear master cylinder reservoir so you can se the fluid level as you push the pads and the pistons back as the level ma rise too much when the pistons are seated fully in their bores and you may have to see this and remove excess fluid, pry the inside pad back pushing the pistons fully into their bores using a putty knife with a wide thin blade to avoid scoring or scratching the brake disc. THEN when the pistons have been fully retracted pull the pad pins part way out until the inside pad drops free and note the orientation of the pad so that you can easily install the new pad in the same orientation with the curved portion of pad necessarily facing the rear of the motorcycle, install the new pad and install but do not tighten the pad pins, then pump the rear brake pedal to move the inside pistons out until they
they contact the inside brake pad, then using a putty knife with a wide thin blade to avoid scoring or scratching the brake disc pry the outside pad back in order to push those pistons fully into their bores, verify that the inside pad is captured between the brake disc and the pistons, completely remove the pad pins to free the outside brake pad. note the orientation of the pad before it falls out and install a new outside brake pad using the same orientation with the curved portion of pad necessarily facing the rear of the motorcycle and if the inside pad moved during the previous step reinstall it. Replacing one pad at a time keeps the anti-rattle spring in place and so if you wish to replace the spring you will have to remove both pads to remove and replace it. THEN inspect the pad pins for unacceptable wear/grooving and replace if and as necessary and install the two pad pins and tighten them to 180-200 in-lbs (20.3- 22.6 Nm). THEN pump the brake pedal to extend the pistons and move the brake pads out against the brake disc. THEN check that the brake fluid is at the proper level about 1/8 inch down from the top of the reservoir and add NEW D.O.T. 5 SILICONE BRAKE FLUID, if necessary, install the master cylinder reservoir cover and tighten the cover screws to 6-8 inlbs(0.7-0.9 Nm), install the right side saddlebag, turn on the ignition/Light Key Switch and observe proper operation of the brake light, safely test ride the motorcycle and if the brakes feel soft or spongy, bleed them until you get a firm, hard pedal. Allow the new pads to properly wear in to the disc by not doing hard stops for the first 100 miles (160 km).

May 19, 2014 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHT - FLHTI Electra...

1 Answer

How do i replace rear brake pads on my 2002 hd fxdwg


After servicing the brakes in any way and before moving the motorcycle always pump the brakes to build brake system pressure and move the pistons and pads out against the brake rotor.

First remove the rear master cylinder reservoir cap and check the fluid level because as the pistons are pushed back into the caliper the fluid level will rise and you do not want it to overflow the reservoir and spill out and to avoid this you must remove sufficient fluid.
Second, loosen, but do not remove, both pad pins with a 12 point .025 inch socket wrench.
Thirdly pry the inside pad back using steady pressure and a sturdy scraper or large screw driver or similar suitable tool, prying between the pad and the brake disc in order to push the caliper pistons back into their bores.
Fourthly, once the pistons have been fully retracted into their bores, pull the pad pins out part way only until the inside pads drop free.Do not completely pull the pad pins out from the caliper at this time because completely removing the pad pins at this time will cause you unnecessary difficulty during re-assembly. ALSO carefully note and remember each pad's original orientation for so you can put the new pads into the correct position and orientation in the caliper. Note that the front left, and the front right (if the front right is present) and all of the rear brake calipers use the same exact brake pad set. Install the pad with two tabs on the inboard side of the rear caliper.
Fifthly install the new inside brake pad using the same orientation as the pad previously removed (with the curved portion of the pad facing the rear of the motorcycle.
Sixthly install the pad pins until the pins snap into place with an audible click but do not fully tighten them at this time.
Next pump the brake pedal lever to move the inside pistons out until they contact the inside brake pads and then pry the outside pad back to push the caliper pistons back into their bores and verify that the inside pads have been captured between the brake disc and the pistons. At this point you can completely remove the pad pins to free the outside brake pad. Again note the pad's original orientation for replacement purpose and orientation
.While the pad pins are out inspect them for grooving and wear and measure the pin diameter in an unworn area, and then in the area of any grooving or wear, and if wear is more than 0.015 in. (0.38mm), replace both pins.
THEN install the new outside brake pad using the same orientation as the pad previously removed and if the inside pad moved during the previous step, reinstall it with the curved portion of the pad facing the rear of motorcycle.
THEN install both pad pins through holes in the inner and outer brake pads and tighten them to 180-200 in-lbs which is (20.3-22.6 Nm).
THEN pump the brake pedal to move the pistons out until they contact both of the brake pads and verify the correct piston location against the pads.
THEN check the brake fluid level in master cylinder and fill it up to the correct level if necessary using ONLY D.O.T. 5 SILICONE BRAKE, install the master cylinder reservoir cap and tighten the reservoir cap screws to 6-8
in-lbswhich is (0.7-0.9 Nm).
WHEN the bike is completely back together test the brakes at low speed in a safe area and also confirm that the brake light works properly and if the brakes feel at all spongy bleed them properly until a hard not spongy brake pedal is obtained. AND avoid making hard stops for the first 100 miles (160 km) to allow the new pads to condition to the brake rotors.

May 10, 2014 | Harley Davidson FXDWG Dyna Wide Glide...

1 Answer

How do i change rear brakes pads on a 2002 hd fxdwg ?


DO NOT REMOVE THE WHEEL AND DO NOT SPLIT THE CALIPER.

After servicing the brakes in any way and before moving the motorcycle always pump the brakes to build brake system pressure and move the pistons and pads out against the brake rotor.

First remove the rear master cylinder reservoir cap and check the fluid level because as the pistons are pushed back into the caliper the fluid level will rise and you do not want it to overflow the reservoir and spill out and to avoid this you must remove sufficient fluid.
Second, loosen, but do not remove, both pad pins with a 12 point .025 inch socket wrench.
Thirdly pry the inside pad back using steady pressure and a sturdy scraper or large screw driver or similar suitable tool, prying between the pad and the brake disc in order to push the caliper pistons back into their bores.
Fourthly, once the pistons have been fully retracted into their bores, pull the pad pins out part way only until the inside pads drop free.Do not completely pull the pad pins out from the caliper at this time because completely removing the pad pins at this time will cause you unnecessary difficulty during re-assembly. ALSO carefully note and remember each pad's original orientation for so you can put the new pads into the correct position and orientation in the caliper. Note that the front left, and the front right (if the front right is present) and all of the rear brake calipers use the same exact brake pad set. Install the pad with two tabs on the inboard side of the rear caliper.
Fifthly install the new inside brake pad using the same orientation as the pad previously removed (with the curved portion of the pad facing the rear of the motorcycle.
Sixthly install the pad pins until the pins snap into place with an audible click but do not fully tighten them at this time.
Next pump the brake pedal lever to move the inside pistons out until they contact the inside brake pads and then pry the outside pad back to push the caliper pistons back into their bores and verify that the inside pads have been captured between the brake disc and the pistons. At this point you can completely remove the pad pins to free the outside brake pad. Again note the pad's original orientation for replacement purpose and orientation
.While the pad pins are out inspect them for grooving and wear and measure the pin diameter in an unworn area, and then in the area of any grooving or wear, and if wear is more than 0.015 in. (0.38mm), replace both pins.
THEN install the new outside brake pad using the same orientation as the pad previously removed and if the inside pad moved during the previous step, reinstall it with the curved portion of the pad facing the rear of motorcycle.
THEN install both pad pins through holes in the inner and outer brake pads and tighten them to 180-200 in-lbs which is (20.3-22.6 Nm).
THEN pump the brake pedal to move the pistons out until they contact both of the brake pads and verify the correct piston location against the pads.
THEN check the brake fluid level in master cylinder and fill it up to the correct level if necessary using ONLY D.O.T. 5 SILICONE BRAKE, install the master cylinder reservoir cap and tighten the reservoir cap screws to 6-8
in-lbswhich is (0.7-0.9 Nm).
WHEN the bike is completely back together test the brakes at low speed in a safe area and also confirm that the brake light works properly and if the brakes feel at all spongy bleed them properly until a hard not spongy brake pedal is obtained. AND avoid making hard stops for the first 100 miles (160 km) to allow the new pads to condition to the brake rotors.

May 10, 2014 | Harley Davidson Motorcycles

2 Answers

Squealing at the right front wheel


The brake lining's have worn away, the squealing was metal to metal (worn pad against metal disc) The worn pad will have damaged the brake disc. Very dangerous. You will now have to have new brake pads and discs fitted to BOTH front wheels to put it right. Good luck

Jan 27, 2014 | 1997 Mitsubishi Pajero

1 Answer

My rear brake pads and rotors have worn out in 1 year and the front brake pads are the original and don't look worn at all. My sub has 150K miles


Its possible. There is an equalizer valve that balances pressure to the 4 wheels.
Two other possible causes are a problem with the parking brake, or the front rotors and pads are glazed and not providing any friction.

Jul 08, 2012 | 2005 Chevrolet Suburban

1 Answer

Ok when i am driving my car and when i need to apply the breaks they make a almost squealing noise but after i drive for a little the stop any help will be much appriciated


I have same problem; turns out all Honda Accords of this generation (2003-2007) do this. It has something to do with cold brakes and unseated pads, and the first time you stop from medium speed, you will hear a grinding, maybe from the back of the car (i think in my case).
My girlfriend looks at me, and we both wonder what it is, but it goes away in about 1 minute and I've realized it's only when the brakes are cold and it's not a problem. My brakes are basically ok, and there is nothing to fix...
I've done enough reading about this car on the internet, I feel pretty sure everybody's Accord does this, so I stopped worrying about it. A real problem, the sound would not go away as soon as the brakes warm up and seat the pads. After that, the breaks work fine.
If it was worn pads, the squealers will start up and not go away quickly. If it was a worse problem, the sound would grind continuously until fixed.
The two major problems with Honda Accord brakes are: 1) Brake judder at hi-speed medium braking. If you are going downhill, and just want to slow the car a little, if your rotors are getting worn, the steering wheel will give you feedback as brake judder. Hit the brakes harder, it will go away but it's scary and requires the rotors be replaced with a much higher quality rotor than came from the factory, and probably want to use ceramic pads (like Bendix CQ or CT). 2) Back brake pads wear down quickly. I read about this constantly with Accord owners, the EX back brakes are smaller rotors and pads than the front, but the electronic brake distribution system of the Accord will balance brake force between front and back, so the front pads will actually last longer than the back pads! This is very unusual but entirely normal for this car. Most cars are the opposite but that may change as we see new generations of cars with more evenly balanced braking front to rear. Be ready and watch your back brakes closely. Mine were toast at 30k...
I replaced my back pads and rotors, used cheapest new rotors I could find, and ceramic pads, and they have lasted considerably longer than the first set.
I now have 92k on my 2004 and the original front brakes are ready to be replaced. I replaced back brakes at 34k I think, and was very surprised they needed replacement at early, but the new pads have gone almost 60k, but look ready to be replaced sometime this year I think.
I have bad judder on high speed braking, but the pads are still ok in front. Rotors are **** in front and I'll replace with Centric Cryo-Stop rotors, they should last a long time as long as they get put on straight and I don't let anybody warp them with an air gun at the tire shop...
Two other more minor problems to watch for on this car: 3) Inner pads may wear faster than outer pads, because the caliper is on the inside, and forces the outside pads to contact the rotor after the inner pads are already braking. Seems like all Accords do this at least a little. The inner pads are not easily viewed without removing wheels, so it's hard to tell, but if your outer pads look like they are starting to get worn down pretty well, chances are good the inner pads are even more worn and you are ready to replace pads. 4) Pads may wear faster on one side of the car (fronts) faster than the other side. For example many people report driver side pads wear faster than passenger side. And the reasons proposed have to do with fast stopping for right hand turns or freeway loops. The car spends more time being braked in a right turn than a left over time.. But of course, on my car, it seems to be the opposite. The passenger side is wearing faster! Go figure..

Jan 12, 2010 | Honda Accord Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

Front brake pads worn uneven, rotor fine


1st off, stay away from Wagner brake pads. You need a good Ceramic or Semi-Metallic in Raybestos, Satisfied or Carquest branded brakes (Blue or Red box are just fine). Your inner pad should always wear a little more than your outside one, especially in a floating caliper, which is what yours is. The escessive wear is from no rear brake assitance for a while, thus causing excessive heat and glazing on your front rotors, meaning they do not grab nearly as well under emergency situations as they once did.

Also, before you go and replace your brakes, have your wheel bearing inspected for improper wear or failure along with your strut bearing and ball joints. They are a lot less likely to cause your scenario, but worth checking before replacing the brakes again.

You should get 50-80,000 miles out of a GOOD set of brakes with no noise or warpage.
Should you need to do your brakes again, do them yourself, but follow these steps one by one and don't skip any of them.

1.) Remove your rotors and have them resurfaced.

2.) Replaced your pads with some good ones, stay away from WAGNER! They are junk!

3.) Install some disc brake quiet or abutment clips on your new pads to ensure a proper placement and fit in the caliper and aganst the piston.

4.) Wash your brake rotors with Soap and Water (dishsoap and water solution - just like you are doing dishes). Yes, you heard me right, use soap and water. Most peeple don't realize how this conditions the cast of the metal to ensure good "seating" of the brake pads and eliminates any chance of noise.

5.) Reinstall all parts and go to a parking lot. Run you car up to 30mph in reverse and slam on the brakes 3-5 times. Your rear brakes will adjust with the proportioning valve, to where they need to be in order to contribute the proper braking force for your system.

6.) Use brake fairly hard for the 1st few days. Cut your braking distance in 1/2 from what you used to do. When you put your foot slightly on the brake pedal, it applies 8 pound of force to the pads, causing heat and glazing. It is better to hit them hard and for a shorter distance then to ride them a long time down a hill or coming to a stop. I used to teach brake classes for technicians and no I did not work for Raybestos, Wagner or any particular Auto parts supplier so it was impartial advice and testing.

7.) After a few days and your brakes are broken in, drive normally and enjoy not having the noise any longer. You will get a good, long life out of these brakes. Guaranteed.

Hope that helps.

Ciao!

Kevin

Jul 28, 2009 | 1999 Pontiac Grand Am GT

1 Answer

Brakes


I would take it to the dealer because of unusual brake pad wear.brake pads under normal wear are not covered usually.But if the outside pad wore down to metal and the inside is ok that is a caliper sticking causing a drag of the outer pad to the rotor.

May 29, 2009 | 2006 Kia Rio

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