Question about 2002 Yamaha YZF-R1

1 Answer

Factory suspension settings

Hi all ,

would like to know standard suspension settings front and rear for 02 r1 and / or where each adjustment is I.E; which dial controls the preload , the compression and the damping . also if anyone has some settings they have found work for a 90 kg man at moderate to fast speeds on the road would be glad to give them a try .
thanks to anyone who posts .
cheers nath

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Master
  • 653 Answers

Spring preload FR
To increase the spring preload and
thereby harden the suspension, turn
the adjusting bolt on each fork leg in direction
a. To decrease the spring preload
and thereby soften the
suspension, turn the adjusting bolt on
each fork leg in direction b
NOTE: _
Align the appropriate groove on the adjusting
mechanism with the top of the
front fork cap bolt.
_
CI-10E
Rebound damping force
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the rebound damping force and
thereby soften the rebound damping,
turn the adjusting screw on each fork
leg in direction b.
CI-02E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
on each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the compression damping force
and thereby soften the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction b.
CI-02E
1. Current setting
2. Front fork cap bolt
Setting
Minimum (soft) 8
Standard 6
Maximum (hard) 1
1. Rebound damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 26 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
1. Compression damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 20 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
_
Although the total number of clicks of a
damping force adjusting mechanism
may not exactly match the above specifications
due to small differences in
production, the actual number of clicks
always represents the entire adjusting
range. To obtain a precise adjustment,
it would be advisable to check the number
of clicks of each damping force adjusting
mechanism and to modify the
specifications as necessary
CI-10E
Rebound damping force RR
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw in direction
a. To decrease the rebound
damping force and thereby soften the
rebound damping, turn the adjusting
screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
in direction a. To decrease the compression
damping force and thereby
soften the compression damping, turn
the adjusting screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Setting
Minimum (soft) 1
Standard 4
Maximum (hard) 9

Whole process where need to turn toward "a" means clockwise and "b" counterclockwise. From Yamaha service manual. Hope this is good enough info to help you out. Good?

Posted on May 04, 2010

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How to adjust front forks on 02 midnight star


Hi, David for this scenario you will need your service/owners manual if you can't find the first and best tool you ever bought for your Yamaha, despair not, for a mere zero $0 you can download another one.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
R1 Fork Tuning and Adjustment Reference Thread
Upgrading the Front Suspension
Yamaha XV16AL Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
YAMAHA XV1600A Owner Manual

May 13, 2017 | 2002 Yamaha Road Star Midnight

1 Answer

2001 yamaha yzf r1 fork specs


Hi, Anonymous for this scenario you will need your service/owners manual if you can't find the first and best tool you ever bought for your Yamaha, despair not, for a mere $0 you can download another one. For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
Tuning the suspension on 2000 R1
http://www.r1-forum.com/forums/2-general-motorcycle-discussions/186963-2007-r1-suspension-setup.html
Moto Data Project
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-yz-owners-manuals

Feb 17, 2014 | 2001 Yamaha YZF-R1

1 Answer

Adjusting rear shock on a 1999 yamaha r1


Hi, Anonymous for this scenario you will need your service/owners manual if you can't find the first and best tool you ever bought for your Yamaha, despair not, for a mere $0 you can download another one. For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
HOW TO Motorcycle Suspension Setup 101
suspension clicker adjustment
1998 1999 Yamaha YZF R1 Service Manual R1 Moto Data Project
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-yz-owners-manuals

Apr 16, 2013 | 2000 Yamaha YZF-R1

1 Answer

Right adjustment front and rear shock yzf r1 2001


Hi, Anonymous for this scenario you will need your service/owners manual if you can't find the first and best tool you ever bought for your Yamaha, despair not, for a mere $0 you can download another one. For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://www.r1-forum.com/forums/10-appearance-mods/8808-Tiller-r1-suspension-settings.html
suspension clicker adjustment
2000 2001 Yamaha YZF R1 Service Manual R1 Moto Data Project
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-yz-owners-manuals

Apr 05, 2012 | 2001 Yamaha YZF-R1

1 Answer

How do I adjust front ride height of yzf r1 on the triple tree


Hi, Tom for this scenario you will need your service/owners manual if you can't find the first and best tool you ever bought for your Yamaha, despair not, for a mere $0 you can download another one. For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
Suspension Setup Guide
http://www.r6-forum.com/forums/56-suspension-settings/107240-raising-lowering-forks-clamps.html
https://r1videos.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/2002-2003-yamaha-r1-service-manual.pdf
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-yz-owners-manuals

Feb 18, 2012 | 2003 Yamaha YZF-R1

1 Answer

I need to know the factory settings for the front and rear suspension on my 2004 Honda cb1300


There is no factory setting. Each motorcycle needs to be set up by the rider for there particular weight. How you set it up depends on whether both the front and rear suspension are adjustable or not. Basically when you sit on the motorcycle with your gear on you want the front and the back of the motorcycle to drop at the same time. This mostly comes into play on hard or extreme cornering. If the front is too soft, the front wheel might wash out first affectively placing you in the face plant position. Likewise if the back slides out first, and it does not go too far,you at least have a chance to recover. Worst case scenario you will high side and again achieve the face plant position. If you have adjustable pressure on the front forks set the front air pressure first to soft or stiff (depending on which you prefer) , then tighten or loosen the spring on the rear shock or, raise or lower the rear shock air pressure to achieve the front and back both dropping at the same time when you bounce on the seat.If there is no front fork adjustment then adjust the back to match the front. If you carry a passenger the rear will need to be stiffened . At least be aware of the difference in handling, if you decide not to readjust for a short drive, to take it easy with passenger on the back. If you are adjusting clicker shocks, Turn the screws and count the clicks. Best starting point is the middle position (5 out of ten). Make minor adjustments to the dampening from there.

May 30, 2011 | 2004 Honda CB 1300

1 Answer

Just want to raise rear shock


Firstly, the best starting point for a suspension set up is the manufacturers original settings. This allows you to go back to a baseline set up, no matter how much fiddling around you do.

Because everyone is slightly different and of differing weights, then a bike will work best when set up to the individual. The following rough guide for a solo rider has worked on bikes I've owned to give me a good suspension set up for road use.

Initially we'll adjust the preload on the suspension.
The front preload:-
1. Put a cable tie round the front fork stanchion (the shiney bit).
2. Get help from a mate and lift the front of the bike, so there is no weight on the front forks, and slide the cable tie down the fork until it rests on the fork seal. If you've got USD forks, then slide the cable tie upwards to the fork seal.
3. Put the bike back on the ground.
4. Now wearing all your riding gear, get on the bike gently and allow your full weight to settle on the bike in roughly a riding position. Try not to bounce the bike as you do it. You should now be sitting there with your tip toes lightly on the ground stabilising the bike.
5. When everything is stable, get your mate to slide the cable tie till it again touches the fork seal.
6. Carefully get off the bike.
7. The front of the bike needs lifting again until the weight is off the forks. Now measure the distance between the cable tie and the fork seal. Ideally the gap should be in the region of 30 to 40mm. If the gap is too large then increase the preload and repeat steps 2 to 7, if the gap is too small then reduce the preload and repeat steps 2 to 7.

The rear preload:-
1. With the help of that same good mate, you'll owe him a beer after all this lifting, lift the back of the bike so the weight is off the rear suspension.
2. Measure from the centre of the rear axle to a fixed part of the bike above it. Remember this measurement as R1.
3. Put the bike back down.
4. Now wearing all your riding gear, get on the bike and allow your full weight to settle on the bike in roughly a riding position. You should now be sitting there with your tip toes lightly on the ground stabilising the bike.
5. Measure from the centre of the axle to the same point on the bike as before. Remember this measurment as R2.
6. Now the maths. R1 minus R2 should be in the region of 30 to 40mm. If it's greater, then the rear preload needs increasing and repeat steps 4 to 6. If it's less then the rear preload needs reduciing and repeat steps 4 to 6. The R1 figure isn't going to change so there's no need to do 1 and 2 again.

Now we'll go onto the black art of the damping adjustment.
If the bike feels unstable, loose and rather bouncy, then the rebound damping needs increasing. Just try a little at a time until you find the setting best for you. If the bike feels hard and bumpy, then reduce the rebound damping. Again, just adjust a little at a time. Make a note somewhere how much you've adjusted things.
If the bike has a tendency to bottom out under braking, then increase the front compression damping. If it feels too rigid or tends to hop under braking, then reduce the front compression damping. If the back of the bike bottoms out in depressions or feels unstable in fast corners, then increase the rear compression damping. If the back end feels rigid and harsh, then reduce the rear compression damping. Remember to make a note of all the adjustments you've made.

If it all goes wrong, return the bike to standard settings and start again.

hope this helps


John

Feb 27, 2011 | 2000 Honda CBR 600 F(4)Y

1 Answer

What do i do as a standard service on my 2002 r1


oil and filter regularly
air cleaner
plugs
coolant level
check brake fliud\ brakes for sponginess(bleed if necessary)
throttle cable is smooth and closes by itself
brake pads for wear
chain adjustment
drain carb bowls
check all lights
check tyres and pressures
Check wheel bearings\swing arm bearings
Battery water
General nuts bolts and screws tighten


and at lesser intervals
carb adjust
valve adjust
coolant change
brake and clutch fluid change
fork oil change
head bearing adjust and grease
rear suspension grease




Apr 30, 2010 | 2002 Yamaha YZF-R1

2 Answers

Lowering


set the twist-style spring preload adjuster to its lowest setting.adjust the front telescopic fork adjustment, Or change the tire aspect ratio(lower profile)on the rear.

Apr 08, 2010 | 1998 Yamaha YZF-R1

1 Answer

DO YOU KNOW THE STANDARD FRONT & REAR SUSPENSION SETTINGS FOR A ZX6R 2000 MODEL J1 AND HOW DO YOU ALTER IT. CHEERS


Rear suspension settings are adjusted via the suspension mechanism located under the bike near the main rear suspension spring on the underneath of bike parallel with the seat- looks like a can (like a slim beer can) and there is a screw one way to tighten and one way to loosen. Dont know settings but try it out one way then the other. Simple turn the screw according to direction arrows.

Jul 11, 2009 | 2000 kawasaki ZX-6R Ninja

Not finding what you are looking for?
2002 Yamaha YZF-R1 Logo

469 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Yamaha Experts

dhnguyen

Level 2 Expert

281 Answers

Steve Sweetleaf
Steve Sweetleaf

Level 3 Expert

1144 Answers

Tony

Level 3 Expert

2600 Answers

Are you a Yamaha Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...