Question about 2002 Yamaha TDM 900

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Changing chain and sprockets dtm 900

What are the torque settings needed for when you change the chain and sprockets on a dtm 900

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Http://www.yamahaownershandbook.com.au/index.php

The owner's manual (Download free from above link) says 150Nm for the rear axle and 40Nm for the brake bolts. Download yourself (downloads adobe reader as well) and check the rest. Cheers.

Posted on Apr 28, 2010

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2 Answers

Adjust primary chain on 2000 fatboy


hi,

Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.


adjust-primary-chain-2000-fatboy-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-0.jpg

adjust-primary-chain-2000-fatboy-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-2.jpg

adjust-primary-chain-2000-fatboy-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-5.jpg

Oct 07, 2014 | 2003 Harley Davidson FLSTFI Fat Boy

1 Answer

How to replace front sprocket


To replace the front sprocket follow the chain to the cover on the left side and remove it, loosen the chain tensioners on the rear axle, slide rear wheel all the way forward and remove chain. Then remove the bolt in the center of the front sprocket, change sprocket and reverse process for assembly. That is the process but if you are going to change the front sprocket you should change both sprockets and chain, as the chain stretches and will cause premature wear of the new sprockets. Complete sets can be found on Ebay for little money, maybe they are not the best but as long as you do not abuse them they will do until you get the money for a good set.

Feb 24, 2014 | 1994 Honda CBR 1000 F

1 Answer

What size chain do i need if my front sprocket has 11 teeth and my back has 50 teeth what will the pitch and length of the chain be


It has nothing to do with the number of teeth on either end, but the torque output of the engine. Take your old chain into your local bike shop and ask them for a complete set. This will make the chain last longer than if you just change the chain. Old teeth will damage the new chain.

Sep 15, 2012 | 2010 Generic Trigger SM 50 Competition

2 Answers

2000 flstc how to adjust primary chain ?


hi,

Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.

2000-flstc-adjust-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-4-0.jpg

2000-flstc-adjust-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-4-2.jpg

2000-flstc-adjust-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-4-5.jpg

Jun 23, 2012 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage...

1 Answer

How do i set camshafts on 1999 duvil northstar


Remove camshaft covrs
Remove front cover
Remove or fully retract all three timing chain tensioners
Remove oil pump
Primary and secondary chain guides should remain in place. Rotate crankshaft until sprocket drive key is at about 1 o'clock position.
Set crankshaft and intermediate shaft sprockets into primary drive chain with their timing marks asjacent to each other.
Install crankshaft and intermediate sprockets over their respective shafts. Rotating crankshaft as necessary to engage crankshaft key in sprocket without changing the timing mark relationship.
Install Flywheel Holder Tool (J-39411) to lock crankshaft in position. Install intermediate shaft sprocket retaining bolt and torque to specifications.
Route secondary chain for left cylinder head over inner row of intermediate shaft teeth.
Route secondary drive chain over chain guide, and install exhaust cam sprocket to chain so camshaft drive pin engages the sprocket notch marked "LE" (Left Exhaust).
There dhould be no slack in the lower section of the chain, and the camshaft drive pin must be perpendicular (90 degrees) to the cylinder head surface.
Install the intake camshaft sprocket into the chain so the sprocket notch marked "LI" (Left Intake) engages camshaft drive pin, while drive pin remains perpendicular to the head face. Minor adjustments can be made to camshaft position to get pin to engage by using a wrench on the hex cast into the camshaft.
Install sprocket retainer bolts and torque to specification.
Repet steps as above to install the right secondary chain to the right camshafts. The right camshaft sprockets are marked "RE" and "RI". In addition, the RE sprocket must contain the camshaft position sensor pickup.

May 27, 2012 | 2000 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

Need directions on how to install a timing chain on a 2002 Saturn L series 2.2 liter along with the allignment marks for the intake and exhaust cams


To Install:
  1. Install or connect the following:
    • Timing chain drive sprocket to crankshaft
      1. Rotate the crank so the mark on the sprocket is at the 5 o'clock position
  2. Assemble chain to the intake camshaft sprocket alignment copper link to the "INT" diamond timing mark on the camshaft sprocket sat_car_22_tmng-chn_pos.gif

    NOTE: When lowering the timing chain rotate the assembly 90° to allow the chain to fall between the cylinder block bosses then rotate the assembly back so the camshaft sprocket is facing forward.
    sat_car_22_tmng-c_hsng_opng.gif

  3. Lower the assembly through the chain housing opening on top of the cylinder head. Use care to ensure that the chain goes around both sides of the cylinder block bosses NOTE: The crankshaft sprocket timing mark will be at approximately the 5 o'clock position.
  4. Route chain around crankshaft sprocket and align silver link to the timing mark sat_car_22_set_tdc.gif

    NOTE: The camshaft sprocket bolts are not reusable; they are torque-to-yield and must be discarded to prevent premature failure.
  5. Install or connect the following:
    • Intake camshaft sprocket loosely onto the intake camshaft then install the new camshaft sprocket bolt finger tight NOTE: It is not necessary to align the sprocket-to-camshaft offset notch at this time.
    • Adjustable timing chain guide through the opening on top of the cylinder head then install the chain guide bolt; torque to 89 lb-in. (10 Nm) sat_car_22_ajst_tmng-ch_guid.gif

      sat_car_22_cm-shft_sprkt_blts.gif

    • Exhaust camshaft sprocket loosely onto the exhaust camshaft with the timing mark on the sprocket aligned with the silver link then install a new camshaft sprocket bolt finger tight
    NOTE: It is not necessary to align the sprocket-to-camshaft offset notch at this time.
    NOTE: The camshaft sprocket bolts are not reusable; they are torque-to-yield and must be discarded to prevent premature failure.
  6. Align the camshaft sprocket-to-camshaft then tighten the camshaft bolt using the following procedure: sat_car_22_crnk_tmng-c_mrk.gif

    NOTE: Do not rotate either camshaft more than 1/2 turn in either direction with the crankshaft at Top Dead Center (TDC). To do so may cause valve to piston contact resulting in a damaged valve and/or a damaged piston.
    • Ensure that the sprocket timing mark is at the 5 o'clock position
    • Rotate the intake camshaft using a 24mm wrench on the flats of the camshaft until the sprocket-to-camshaft alignment notch seats
    • When the sprocket seats on the camshaft tighten the sprocket bolt finger tight
    • Rotate exhaust camshaft using a 24mm wrench on the flats of the camshaft until the sprocket-to-camshaft alignment notch seats
    • When the sprocket seats on the camshaft tighten the sprocket bolt finger tight
  7. Verify that all colored links are aligned with the appropriate marks on the camshaft and crankshaft sprockets NOTE: If they are not repeat steps 1C through 4.
  8. Install the fixed timing chain guide and bolts; torque to 89 lb-in. (10 Nm)
  9. Install the fixed timing chain guide bolt access hole plug; torque to 30 lb-ft. (40 Nm)
  10. Install upper timing chain guide and bolts; torque to 89 lb-in. (10 Nm) NOTE: Use a 24mm wrench to support the camshaft while applying torque to the camshaft sprocket bolt. Do not torque the camshaft bolts against the timing chain as it may damage the timing chain.
  11. Torque the intake and exhaust camshaft sprocket bolts; torque as follows:
    • First Pass: 63 lb-ft. (85 Nm)
    • Second Pass: Turn an additional 30° using a torque angle gauge
  12. Install the sealing ring and tensioner assembly; torque to 55 lb-ft. (75 Nm)
  13. Install or connect the following:
    • Timing chain oil nozzle and bolt; torque to 89 lb-in. (10 Nm)
    • Camshaft cover assembly
    • Engine front cover
    • Negative battery cable; torque to 13 lb-ft. (17 Nm)

Nov 12, 2010 | 2002 Saturn L-Series

2 Answers

How to change primary chain tension on 2007 Harley Dyna Low Rider


hi,

Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.

change-primary-chain-tension-2007-harley-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-0.jpg

change-primary-chain-tension-2007-harley-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-2.jpg

change-primary-chain-tension-2007-harley-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-5-5.jpg

Mar 22, 2010 | Harley Davidson FXDL Dyna Low Rider...

1 Answer

It is difficult to change gear from high gear to low gear, it is not as easy as going to high gear. Model Kawasaki Fury 125 (2008)


I am assuming when you say changing from high gear to low gear you are talking about changing the chain drive gears if so yes it can be difficult because the rear wheel must be removed and also the front sprocket must be held stationary in order to unscrew the hold down nut, this is usually the hardest part of the job but not impossible. Don't forget that most people that change the sprockets to increase off the line torque usually change the sprocket in sets unless you want to shorten or lengthen the chain, sometimes this si neccessary other times the chain slack adjustment range will allow you to get away with not needing to lengthen the chain, this only applies to people who decide not to chain the sprockets as a set.

Dec 07, 2009 | kawasaki W 650 Motorcycles

2 Answers

How to install hd self adjusting primary chain tensioner in O4 Ultra.



Sooner or later, every bike will need a new chain and sprockets. Once a chain begins to wear, its pitch changes and wears the sprocket teeth. Then the chain begins to wear even faster. Then it's time for a new chain, and a new pair of sprockets.
The rear wheel on my motorcycle had been misaligned (I had used the inaccurate etched indicators on the swingarm-rather than a ruler against the sprocket-to set wheel alignment) and ridden hard through a gritty, salty winter. The rear sprocket was in rough shape, and the chain was making lots of popping sounds as the bike went down the road.
Changing a chain is a fairly basic job that requires a chain breaker / riveting tool and whatever is needed to remove the rear wheel and sprockets. It's nice to have a blow torch and a torque wrench on hand for this job, too.
The ingenious Terra-X chain tool is made in Australia out of tool steel, and weighs just 150 grams. A big hollow bolt threads into the bigger of the two holes, and is used when pressing outer plates onto new master links. A smaller bolt with a pin can thread into the hollow bolt, and is used to push link pins out of old chains or to peen new master link pins by pushing them against a grub screw threaded into the steel body's other hole. That little grub screw with a rounded steel end screws into the smaller hole of the chain breaker. It fits into and peens the hole of the new master link.
When changing a chain, the first step is to loosen the bolts on the front sprocket. It's good to get those loose while the chain is still on the bike, partly to avoid putting undue stress on the transmission, and partly to avoid getting deep into the job and finding that the front sprocket bolts are stuck. In this case, the small allen bolts needed a bit of heat to come undone.
After the bolts are loose, it's time to break the chain. With the Terra-X chain tool, you remove the small grub screw and use the small bolt with the pin to push out one of the chain's pins. No grunting or swearing required.
Then comes sprocket replacement. Six nuts on the rear sprocket, the two bolts on the front sprocket, and that step is done. I had a torque wrench handy, so I could get the torque values just right when putting everything back together.
The next step is the big one: installing the master link that joins the ends of the new chain together. The master link comes with a little bag with some X-Rings, a master link, and some sticky tan lube. Smear the lube on the pins and inside the X-Rings, then begin to assemble the master link around the two ends of the chain, making sure to get the X-Rings in the right spots.
Pressing the outer plate onto the master link is the hardest part of the job. I removed the pin bolt from the Terra-X tool and used the hollow bolt to push the outer plate onto the master link's pins. It took a few tries, but eventually I got it in the correct position.
After the sprockets are on and the master link is in position, the master link's pins need to be peened. With the Terra-X, the pin bolt pushes the master link pin against the grub screw's steel ball, and flares the pin. It takes a lot of effort-mostly because it's not easy to get a lot of leverage on tools when they're underneath a motorcycle.
Position the wheel for proper chain tension, torque everything to the correct specs, and you're back on the road. The new chain is smooth, nearly silent, and ready for thousands of miles of high-speed running.


install-hd-self-adjusting-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-0.jpg

install-hd-self-adjusting-primary-chain-l3pkhus41ndyrzcpoepz5ks5-3-1.jpg

Mar 30, 2009 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

2 Answers

Chain


Yes. It’s likely that the sprockets are worn. Putting a new chain non a worn pair of sprockets will make the chain wear out faster—and replacing the sprockets without replacing the chain will sear out the sprockets. Do them as a set.

Nov 20, 2008 | 2005 Harley Davidson VRSCB V-Rod

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