Question about 2001 Sachs Roadster 650

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Front end seems to have no rebound and is spongy

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Are the for seals leaking? The quantity and viscosity of oil in each fork is pretty critical. Check your owners manual for the correct specs. Good luck, and nice bike!

Posted on Feb 01, 2010

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Service manual


For a rebound adjustment, jack up your bike.
Be sure the front tire is off the ground.
Once this is done let your springer front end fall either to the left or right. Your springer front end should only bounce back about a inch and then stop.

Most people prefer the "Fall-Away" adjustment.
Jack the bike so the front end is off the ground.
Place a piece of tape along the front edge of the front fender.
Find the center balance point of the front end.
Place a pointer of some sort at the center of the fender. Make a mark on the tape for the center balance point. Mark does not have to be in the exact center of the fender.
With the pointer in place, turn front end in each direction and note where the front end just begins to fall away on it's own. Make a mark on the tape at these positions. Marks do not have to be centered and may be unequal distances from the center mark.
Measure the distance between the two outer marks. If the distance is 1-2 inches the fall away is correct. If less than 1", loosen the upper bearing retainer nut. If more than 2", tighten the upper bearing retainer nut.

Feb 04, 2014 | 2004 Harley Davidson FXSTS - FXSTSI...

1 Answer

How to harden the forks and rear shock


Both are adjustable. The forks have an adjustment screw. Press down on the front end while standing next to the bike. It should rebound fairly quick but it shouldn't start to go back down again on it's own (oscillates due to not enough damping). Adjust screws evenly on both forks (exact same amount) clockwise and repeat process mentioned until rebound is smooth and doesn't oscillate. The same applies to the rear but you have only one adjustment on the Ohlins reservoir for the monoshock assembly. Do the bounce test and adjust clockwise until the rebound feels firm and doesn't oscilllate. It should handle like a beast and wheelie much easier now.

Nov 21, 2013 | Husqvarna SM 510 R Motorcycles

1 Answer

What does it mean when your struts are dead


It most commonly refers to front struts, and means they have lost the shock absorption and rebound capabilities they once had. This leads to accelerated tire wear, shimmy of the front wheels, bad road-holding, and crashing of the front end on bumps.


You should replace both sides, and the strut mountings and bump stops as well.

Oct 22, 2012 | 1992 Toyota Camry V6

1 Answer

Hi i have a triumph thunderbird 1996 900cc. when i travel over dips in the road the rebound on the front folks tops out creating a load knock. How do i adjust rebound on the front forks? I have turned...


fork oil replacement and seals fixed mine when it did that. Like you, I also tried to adjust the settings to no avail, then replaced oil to proper level for both sides, and presto, fixed.

Dec 07, 2010 | 1995 Triumph Triumph Thunderbird

1 Answer

Factory suspension settings


Spring preload FR
To increase the spring preload and
thereby harden the suspension, turn
the adjusting bolt on each fork leg in direction
a. To decrease the spring preload
and thereby soften the
suspension, turn the adjusting bolt on
each fork leg in direction b
NOTE: _
Align the appropriate groove on the adjusting
mechanism with the top of the
front fork cap bolt.
_
CI-10E
Rebound damping force
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the rebound damping force and
thereby soften the rebound damping,
turn the adjusting screw on each fork
leg in direction b.
CI-02E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
on each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the compression damping force
and thereby soften the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction b.
CI-02E
1. Current setting
2. Front fork cap bolt
Setting
Minimum (soft) 8
Standard 6
Maximum (hard) 1
1. Rebound damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 26 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
1. Compression damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 20 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
_
Although the total number of clicks of a
damping force adjusting mechanism
may not exactly match the above specifications
due to small differences in
production, the actual number of clicks
always represents the entire adjusting
range. To obtain a precise adjustment,
it would be advisable to check the number
of clicks of each damping force adjusting
mechanism and to modify the
specifications as necessary
CI-10E
Rebound damping force RR
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw in direction
a. To decrease the rebound
damping force and thereby soften the
rebound damping, turn the adjusting
screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
in direction a. To decrease the compression
damping force and thereby
soften the compression damping, turn
the adjusting screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Setting
Minimum (soft) 1
Standard 4
Maximum (hard) 9

Whole process where need to turn toward "a" means clockwise and "b" counterclockwise. From Yamaha service manual. Hope this is good enough info to help you out. Good?

May 03, 2010 | 2002 Yamaha YZF-R1

1 Answer

FRONT END SEEMS SPONGY


Try checking the folk pinch bolts on the top and bottom yokes, it would appear that your bike is oversteering ie the forks are twisting causing this making the bike unstable especially whilst cornering. Tightening the bolts to the correct torque should cure this.

Apr 19, 2010 | 1988 BMW R 100 RS

1 Answer

The front end (forks) seem spongy with little or no rebound, and wallow through corners


Hi !
The oil in the shockers has leaked. You will need to firstly change the shocker washer and then only fill new oil.
Have you met with any small accident where your shocker could have been slightly bent??? resulting in oil leaking out. If so you will need to change the shocker rods.

Regards
Berry

Feb 01, 2010 | 2001 Sachs Roadster 650

1 Answer

Clunking noise in front end of harley


would guess that they are not bottoming out, they are topping out. doubt that you get them to full compression on bumps or braking would really be a bad experience, it's more likely that after compression on a bump, the forks spring back out as far as they will go and reach the end of their travel, it's because they aren't very sporty forks and lack enough rebound damping. I have a 2008 1200 sportster and it does it. cure would be maybe thicker oil in forks to slow up the rebound but would also slow the up stroke over bumps. you can get just about evey accessory for a Harley so there's probably a kit available to fix the damping.

Jul 08, 2009 | 2006 Harley Davidson FXDBI Street Bob

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