Question about 2001 Sachs Roadster 650

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The front end (forks) seem spongy with little or no rebound, and wallow through corners

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Hi !
The oil in the shockers has leaked. You will need to firstly change the shocker washer and then only fill new oil.
Have you met with any small accident where your shocker could have been slightly bent??? resulting in oil leaking out. If so you will need to change the shocker rods.

Regards
Berry

Posted on Feb 01, 2010

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1 Answer

How to harden the forks and rear shock


Both are adjustable. The forks have an adjustment screw. Press down on the front end while standing next to the bike. It should rebound fairly quick but it shouldn't start to go back down again on it's own (oscillates due to not enough damping). Adjust screws evenly on both forks (exact same amount) clockwise and repeat process mentioned until rebound is smooth and doesn't oscillate. The same applies to the rear but you have only one adjustment on the Ohlins reservoir for the monoshock assembly. Do the bounce test and adjust clockwise until the rebound feels firm and doesn't oscilllate. It should handle like a beast and wheelie much easier now.

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Yamaha ybr 125 front forks


No. The springs are in both forks, and they are for rebound.

Jun 25, 2013 | Motorcycles

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Hi i have a triumph thunderbird 1996 900cc. when i travel over dips in the road the rebound on the front folks tops out creating a load knock. How do i adjust rebound on the front forks? I have turned...


fork oil replacement and seals fixed mine when it did that. Like you, I also tried to adjust the settings to no avail, then replaced oil to proper level for both sides, and presto, fixed.

Dec 07, 2010 | 1995 Triumph Triumph Thunderbird

1 Answer

How do you remove the forks on a 2001 fxd superglide






Hopefully you will glean all you need to know from this but if you want or need more information or more FXD specific information PLEASE H

Hopefully the information below will be okay BUT if you need any more or any more specific information please post a comment and describe what you want/need.

REPLACING FORK OIL Replace front fork oil at every 20,000 mile (32,000 km) service interval and/or prior to storage.


ALL BUT FXDX & FXDXT models


Raise and support the motorcycle so the front end is off the floor and the forks are fully extended, on FXDL models, remove the center plug from each fork cap, on all other models, remove the fork tube caps, remove the drain screws from the bottom of each fork and drain the fork oil, replace the drain screws and washers and tighten the screws

to 13-17 in-lbs (1.5-2.0 Nm) THEN see Table 1-6. and fill the fork with Harley-Davidson TYPE E FORK OIL (Part No. HD-99884-80) as set out in the Table. THEN if apart assemble the forks as follows:


a. FXD, FXDXT, FXDWG models: install both fork tube caps and tighten them to 11-22 ft-lbs (14.9-29.8 Nm).

b. FXDL models: install center plugs and tighten until secure.


Fork oil amounts can be measured two ways: use the oz./cc measurement if fork is left in frame; use the in./mm measurement if the fork is disassembled in which case the oil level is measured from the top of the fork tube with the spring removed and the fork fully compressed.


Table 1-6. Type E Fork Oil Amounts for 2001 DYNA


MODEL OZ CC IN. MM

FXDXT 11.5 341 6.10 154.9

FXDWG 12.0 356 7.28 182.9

FXD 10.6 314 6.69 169.9


PART NO. SPECIALTY TOOL

HD-41177 Fork tube holder

HD-41549A Fork spring compression tool

HD-41551 Spring plate tool

HD-36583 Fork seal installer

HD-59000A Pro-level oil gauge



FRONT FORKS: FXDX & FXDXT 2.20

REMOVAL

Raise and support the motorcycle so the front end is off the floor and the forks are fully extended, remove both front brake calipers and the front wheel, remove the front fender, remove the front fairing, remove the headlamp bracket and attach the headlamp to the frame using a rubber bungee strap, loosen the upper and lower triple clamp pinch bolts and pull the fork sides from the brackets.


DISASSEMBLY

Remove the stopper ring, remove the spring preload adjuster but DO NOT unthread the rebound adjuster from the damper rod because incorrect assembly could result in reduced adjustment range. THEN unthread the fork cap from the fork tube and allow the fork leg to drop, exposing the spring, THEN get a FORK SPRING COMPRESSION TOOL (Part No. HD-41549A) on the spring collar, turn the screws in to engage the holes in collar, compress the spring until the SPRING PLATE TOOL (Part No. HD-

41551) can be positioned between the spacer and the spring collar, THEN hold the fork bolt and compression adjuster, remove the fork bolt from the compression adjuster, remove the spring adjuster plate from the fork bolt, remove spacer, spring collar and spring, pour out the fork oil by pumping the fork leg and rod 8-10 times or until rod the moves freely. THEN position fork slider in vise using a FORK TUBE HOLDER such as (Part No. HD-41177) to avoid damage. THEN remove the socket head bolt, remove the damper from the fork tube, remove the cover from the slider, remove seal and stopper ring, pull the fork tube out of the slider, remove the oil seal, spacer and guide bushing from the fork tube.


CLEANING AND INSPECTION

Measure the fork spring free length and replace the spring if it is shorter than 17.00 in. (431.8 mm), check the fork tube and the slider for score marks, scratches or abnormal wear, check the slide and guide bushings for excessive wear or scratches, set the fork tube on V-blocks and measure runout which should not exceed 0.008 in. (0.2 mm).


ASSEMBLY

Coat the oil seal with TYPE E FORK OIL, before installing the slide bushing and guide bushing, lubricate them with fork oil, THEN install the guide bushing and the spacer seal noting that the guide bushing opening must be oriented to the side and NOT to the front or rear, THEN slip the slider into the fork tube, place the slide bushing over the fork tube until it rests on the slider, drive the guide bushing with the spacer seal into the slider, lubricate a new oil seal with TYPE E FORK Oil, drive the oil seal into the slider using FORK SEAL INSTALLER (Part No. HD-36583). install the stopper ring and dust seal, (if the rebound adjuster was removed from the damper rod bottom the lock nut on the threaded portion of damper rod, holding a thumb on the detent spring and ball, back out (turn counterclockwise) the rebound adjuster to the last "click." and then turn down (clockwise) 17 "clicks", thread the rebound adjuster onto the damper rod until the adjuster stops at maximum thread engagement (but do not force it), thread the locknut onto the damper rod up until it contacts the base of the rebound adjuster and tighten it in place), THEN holding the slider in a vise while being careful not to damage it. install the damper tube into the fork tube and tighten the socket screw and washer to 22-29 ft-lbs (29.8-39.3 Nm). THEN pour half the TYPE E FORK OIL into the fork tube, slowly pump the damper rod 10 or more times, position the damper rod in the fully bottomed position and pour the remaining amount of TYPE E FORK OIL into the fork tube. THEN using a PRO-LEVEL OIL GAUGE (Part No. HD-59000A) or similar adjust the oil level to 5.04 in. (128 mm). THEN carefully clean and install the spring, the spring collar, and the spacers with the sharp edge created when they were stamped out when manufactured, facing the collar. THEN using a FORK SPRING COMPRESSION TOOL such as (Part No. HD-41549A) push spring collar down and place a SPRING PLATE such as (Part No. HD-41551) between the spacer and the spring collar, install the fork cap and tighten it against the rebound adjuster to 22-29 ft-lbs (29.8-39.3 Nm). THEN tighten the fork cap onto the fork tube to 11-22 ft-lbs (14.9-29.8 Nm), install the spring adjuster plate, replace the O-rings on the spring preload adjuster and lubricate them with fork oil. THEN install the spring preload adjuster and the stopper ring and carefully drive the slider cover into the slider.


INSTALLATION

Insert both fork side assemblies up through the fork stem and bracket and upper bracket and tighten the fork stem bracket pinch bolt(s) to 30-35 ft-lbs (40.7-47.5 Nm). Then re-install the headlamp bracket, install the front fender, install the front wheel and the brake caliper When the motorcycle is again ready for the road adjust the headlamp and road test the motorcycle.

Oct 01, 2010 | 2001 Harley Davidson FXD Dyna Super Glide

1 Answer

Factory suspension settings


Spring preload FR
To increase the spring preload and
thereby harden the suspension, turn
the adjusting bolt on each fork leg in direction
a. To decrease the spring preload
and thereby soften the
suspension, turn the adjusting bolt on
each fork leg in direction b
NOTE: _
Align the appropriate groove on the adjusting
mechanism with the top of the
front fork cap bolt.
_
CI-10E
Rebound damping force
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the rebound damping force and
thereby soften the rebound damping,
turn the adjusting screw on each fork
leg in direction b.
CI-02E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
on each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the compression damping force
and thereby soften the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction b.
CI-02E
1. Current setting
2. Front fork cap bolt
Setting
Minimum (soft) 8
Standard 6
Maximum (hard) 1
1. Rebound damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 26 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
1. Compression damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 20 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
_
Although the total number of clicks of a
damping force adjusting mechanism
may not exactly match the above specifications
due to small differences in
production, the actual number of clicks
always represents the entire adjusting
range. To obtain a precise adjustment,
it would be advisable to check the number
of clicks of each damping force adjusting
mechanism and to modify the
specifications as necessary
CI-10E
Rebound damping force RR
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw in direction
a. To decrease the rebound
damping force and thereby soften the
rebound damping, turn the adjusting
screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
in direction a. To decrease the compression
damping force and thereby
soften the compression damping, turn
the adjusting screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Setting
Minimum (soft) 1
Standard 4
Maximum (hard) 9

Whole process where need to turn toward "a" means clockwise and "b" counterclockwise. From Yamaha service manual. Hope this is good enough info to help you out. Good?

May 03, 2010 | 2002 Yamaha YZF-R1

1 Answer

FRONT END SEEMS SPONGY


Try checking the folk pinch bolts on the top and bottom yokes, it would appear that your bike is oversteering ie the forks are twisting causing this making the bike unstable especially whilst cornering. Tightening the bolts to the correct torque should cure this.

Apr 19, 2010 | 1988 BMW R 100 RS

1 Answer

Adjusting front fork rebound damping screw


It sounds like your forks need servicing by a professional. Your instincts were right, they should be about equal length, so something BAD has happened to one of the forks. I would recommend going to a sport bike speed shop that specializes in suspension work to have this fixed since the guys at HD barely know how to change the spark plugs on a Buell in most cases.

A good shop can not only repair the damage, but help you to set the suspension exactly right for you (the Buell manual is just a ballpark setting) by checking the sag in the suspension, and they can even upgrrade your forks and shocks for you.

Arguably the best in the business is Max at traxxion dynamics. They have drop in cartridges that allow the showa forks to come close to the Ohlins used by the pros. Not that the showas are bad, In fact Buell always put decent factory suspension on their bikes, which is why it's repairable, instead of needing to replace it.

Feb 01, 2010 | 2003 Buell Lightning XB9S

1 Answer

Front end seems to have no rebound and is spongy


Are the for seals leaking? The quantity and viscosity of oil in each fork is pretty critical. Check your owners manual for the correct specs. Good luck, and nice bike!

Feb 01, 2010 | 2001 Sachs Roadster 650

1 Answer

Clunking noise in front end of harley


would guess that they are not bottoming out, they are topping out. doubt that you get them to full compression on bumps or braking would really be a bad experience, it's more likely that after compression on a bump, the forks spring back out as far as they will go and reach the end of their travel, it's because they aren't very sporty forks and lack enough rebound damping. I have a 2008 1200 sportster and it does it. cure would be maybe thicker oil in forks to slow up the rebound but would also slow the up stroke over bumps. you can get just about evey accessory for a Harley so there's probably a kit available to fix the damping.

Jul 08, 2009 | 2006 Harley Davidson FXDBI Street Bob

3 Answers

Yamaha yz250 suspension settings


There is too much involved to include everything, but I can describe to you what everything does.

You have compression dampening which slows the rate at which the shock or forks can compress. Then you have rebound dampening which slows the rate at which the shock or forks can extend.

The compression adjuster on the rear shock is toward the top, sticking out sideways where the resivoir mounts to the side of the shock. The rebound adjuster can be seen below the swing arm on the side of the shock.

The compression adjusters on the front forks can be seen from the top. (its the one in the center, the other is an air bleed) The rebound adjuster is in the center of the lower fork leg, and can be seen from below the fork.



The settings are measured in the number of "clicks" from seated. More clicks from seated will be softer, and less clicks from seated will be stiffer. The best thing to do is to see where you are now and adjusting from there. I like to write them down as I go. Turn the adjuster clockwise untill it stops and take note of the number of clicks. DO NOT FORCE IT! You should also check your service manual and take note of the standard setting, and also take note of the maximum number of clicks you can go from seated. You dont want to screw the adjusters out farther than the max, shock damage can result.

You might try changing to the standard settings and try adjusting from there. If the bike doesnt ride at least moderately decent at the standard settings, your shock and/or forks may need a rebuild.


Generally speaking more compression dampening in the rear will result in less bottoming but a harsher ride. Less would result in the oppisite.

More rebound dampening in the rear will result in too slow of extension and packing up which will make the bike swap in the whoops, but it will not tend to buck you or throw you into a nose dive over a jump. Less would result in the oppisite.

In the front, more compression dampening will be about the same situation as described above with the shock.

More rebound dampening in the front forks can tend to take pressure off of the front wheel in corners causing washout, but too little can make the bike want to loop out over jumps.

Nov 21, 2008 | 2003 Yamaha YZ 250

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