Question about 2005 Suzuki Boulevard C50

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Cost for valve tappet adjustment /Suzuki 2005 S50 12,000 miles.

I live in Phoenix, AZ, USA. What can I expect to pay to have my valve tappets adjusted on a 2005 Suzuki S50, with 12,000 miles in good condition. I don't think this service has ever been done. Thank-you

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Usually in the $200 range, as the bike must be stone cold and takes a little time to get to everything. Most places charge up to $80/hour for labor. Do not be surprised if you see a 3 hour bill.
Hope this helps

JP

Posted on Nov 19, 2009

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How to adjust tappets


You have asked a very big question. Adjusting the tappets is another way of saying adjusting the valve clearances.

Lots of engines these days are fitted with hydraulic tappets that are self-adjusting. Some engines are overhead camshaft types with bucket tappets and the clearances are adjusted by measuring and selecting different thickness shims. The shims are sometimes under the bucket and sometimes over. The former is a fairly big and complex job to adjust and the latter is fiddly and requires much patience.

Traditional designs using adjusting screws and locknuts exist on all manner of engine types and once the principle of which one to adjust when is learned, these are relatively straightforward.

I strongly suggest you discover first what sort of tappets you need to learn to adjust, learn something about the way the engine works and why the tappets need periodic adjustment and then pay somebody to show you how to do the job so next time you will be able to do it yourself.
Adjusting the tappets is one of the core skills of the mechanic and it is learned better by demonstration and understanding than from a book. No book can adequately describe when a feeler blade has a good or a bad "feel"...

Good luck!

Mar 28, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How do I set tappets on Nissan 1400


With a special tool called a feeler gauge remove the valve covers and one by one bring the cylinders up to top dead center (both valves are fully closed at this point) adjust to factory spec. All adjustments are done cold. If engine is very high miles reduce the clearances in specs by slight amount (.002") to the tight side to account for wear in the valve train parts.

Nov 16, 2015 | 2006 Nissan 1400 Bakkie

1 Answer

Kia carens problems


Tappets......... perhaps is what your friend said. The tappets are part of the engine inlet and exhaust valve set up. Most tappets are self adjusting in modern motors, (Hydraulic).
The old fashioned tappets are manually adjusted during regular car servicing. This happens at set intervals, for instance every 20,000 miles.
Inlet valves allow air and fuel into the engine and exhaust valves let the burnt fuel and air out.
Tappets are fitted between the inlet and exhaust valves, they ensure that the valves open on time and more importantly close properly. If the tappet happened to be badly adjusted and did not let the valve close properly then damage to the valve and cylinder head can happen by burning.
If you have a significant power loss I would be surprised to find that the just tappets/valves were to blame.

Jan 26, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Valve Clearances inlet and exhaust


j24b engine D.O.H.C.
U.S.A?
open hood , look up. see white sticker, see clearances.?
off online F.S.M
Valve clearance specification when cold :
59 to 77deg F or 15 to 25deg C (engine temps)
Intake: 0.0063 to 0.0094 inch (0.16 to 0.24mm)
Exhaust: 0.0123to 0.0153 inch (0.31to 0.39mm)
you must remove the bucket,tappet , to change lash.
MIKE IT (that means a micrometer)
then buy shims or new buckets to fit. (generic answer)
the book says buy correct tappet after measuring, yours.
and it's out of range, and doing the math first.

that is it.

May 05, 2013 | 2010 Suzuki Kizashi

2 Answers

I have H.Activa 2005 model.After getting it serviced ,abnormal sounds started coming from the engine.Even pick up is also poor.I think the abnormal sounds are coming from the valves.Could anyone please...


The piston must be at Top Dead Centre to adjust the valve tappet clearances. This will only stop it from ticking. Have you checked the type of and amount of oil in the engine?
Hope that helps.

Dec 27, 2010 | 2005 Honda Activa

1 Answer

Rattle nosie on tappets on engine start up,do tappets or valves need adjustment,and if so what are settings,and the best way to do the job,regards eamo.


Sometimes a dirty oil filter will cause lack of oil to the top end at startup.
As soon as the oil warms, it flows better and faster and hence the noise goes away after warm up.

If you need valves adjusted, the motor must be at TDC on compression stroke(both valves closed)
The motor must be cold do not try to adjust the valve clearance on a warm engine.

On TDC, pull the valve covers and check the clearance on the intake and exhaust valves by inserting a feeler gauge under the tappet.
INTAKE should be : .03-05mm
EXHAUST should be .05-.08 mm

Im sure you don't need a valve adjustment. but if you do: Put Engine on TDC
Loosen the locknut with a 9 or 10 mm wrench, stick the feeler gauge under the tappet, and tighten the little square tipped valve adjuster screw clockwise until you feel friction on the feeler guage.
Enough friction that the feeler gauge feels tight but you can still slide it back and forth.
Not carefully tighten the locknut. Check the feeler guage during tightening to make sure it didn't get too tight or too loose. Once you set the clearance, move to the next valve, and repeat the process using the other feeler guage.
Once both are done put the covers back on and your done,

NOTE: You may have to remove seat, gas tank, airbox, and side covers to get to the covers.

Dec 03, 2010 | 2000 Suzuki GZ 125 Marauder

1 Answer

Tappet`s knocking on my kymco ck 125


Option 1: Go to mechanic

Option 2: Adjust the tappets. If you have never adjusted tappets or worked with engines before it is better to have someone experienced with you. The following is the procedure I use.

1: Carefully remove side panels.
2: Close fuel tap and disconnect pipe.
3: Carefully remove fuel tank. (undo the bolt under the seat and slide the tank 2 inches back, then lift it upwards)
4: Undo the bolts of the cylinder head cover (3 bolts with 12mm head, one of them also holds a small bracket for the throttle cable or ignition wire, I can't remember).
5: Remove the cylinder head cover. If you find this difficult put the bike in 5th gear and rotate the engine (by rotating the rear wheel) to the "inlet valve open" position so that the cover clears the "inlet valve rocker". Be careful that you do not damage the top cover gasket (made of rubber) or you will have an oil leak and no lubrication to the rockers.
6: Rotate the engine to a position with both valves closed, as close as possible to "top dead centre of compression/power strokes". There is a notch on the flywheel indicating top dead centre - you see this by opening the cap on the top of the flywheel cover on the left side of the bike. (do not stay at "top dead centre of exhaust/intake strokes")
7: Check the free play of the rockers on the valves. The service manual recommends a clearance between the valve and the rocker of 0.08mm with the engine cold (left to cool overnight). Maximum acceptable is 0.10mm and minimum is 0.06mm. The gap is checked using a feeler gauge (you know that you have a gap of 0.08mm by sliding a feeler that is 0.08mm thick and there is just a little friction slowing you down - if the feeler is hard to pull the gap is less than 0.08 and if the feeler passes with nothing resisting it then the gap is larger than 0.08mm).
8: If the tappets are knocking then the gap is too large. Undo the locknut on the tappet adjuster (10mm nut at the end of the rocker) just enough to let you turn the tappet adjuster. Then rotate the tappet adjuster until you get the right gap and tighten the locknut. Be sure to hold the tappet adjuster with pliers or something else while tightening the locknut so that the adjuster does not rotate.
9: Check and re-check that the gap between the adjuster and the valve is as specified. Incorrectly adjusted tappets are very bad for the engine, especially "tight" tappets with no gap between adjuster screw and valve. The first time you adjust tappets you might have to repeat from step 7 several times until you get used to it.
10: Assemble everything in the reverse order of disassembly. You might have to rotate the engine to "intake valve open" position again to place the cylinder head cover easily. During assembly be careful the the rubber gasket of the cover is not damaged or out of place. There is an oil path from the head to a nozzle above the rockers and the gasket must seal this well.
10: Once you assemble everything start the engine and once it is hot enjoy a more silent bike. It is normal on these engines to have some tappet noise when cold, but if the tappets are adjusted right they are nearly silent when hot.

Always refer to an expert when you are not sure. Maybe the first time it is safer to watch your trusted mechanic do this work.

Sep 20, 2010 | 2005 Kymco Stryker 125

1 Answer

Adjustment on 1000cc values 1983 harley davidson sportster


To adjust the valves on your Ironhead Sportster, first collapse all the pushrod tubes, remove the spark plugs, and get the rear wheel off the ground. Put the transmission in fourth gear. Now, use the rear wheel to turn the engine.

To adjust the valves, bring the front cylinder to Top Dead Center. Use a common plastic drinking straw down in the spark plug hole to make sure the piston is at Top Center. Make sure both tappets for the front cylinder are all the way down. Now, loosen the lock nut slightly and turn the adjuster to make the tappet longer. You want to make it just long enough so that you can't turn it with your fingers. Gradually back down on the tappet until you can turn the pushrod with your fingers. Lock the locknut down when done. Now do the other tappet.

Once you've done the front cylinder, turn the engine using the rear wheel until the rear piston comes to Top Center. Always turn the engine in the normal direction of rotation. Adjust the two tappet the same way as you did the front cylinder tappets.

When finished, put the transmission in neutral, lower the rear wheel, put the plugs back in, and close up the pushrod tubes.

These tappets set to Zero Backlash, none. Therefore this must be done on a completely cold engine. When the engine starts up and as it warms up, the cylinders and head "grow" due to the heat expansion properties of the metal. As they grow, you pick up valve lash and the valves will clatter a bit. This is where the old saying came from, "You can tell it's a Harley from a mile away by the way the engine sounds. You can tell it's an Ironhead from a half mile away from the valve clatter". If you get the valves too tight, when the weather cools down in the winter, you could wind up with a valve standing open just enough to make the bike impossible to start due to low starting compression. It's better to have the valves a bit loose and have them clatter than have them too tight making the engine difficult to start.

Good Luck,
Steve

Apr 24, 2010 | 1979 Harley Davidson XLH 1000 Sportster

1 Answer

What should the compression be on a 2004 Suzuki DRZ 125?


With the throttle held wide open, the compression should be between 140 psi and 180 psi. If the compression reads lower that 140 psi, adjust the valve tappet clearances and try again. Insufficient valve tappet clearance is the most common cause of low compression in four stroke engines.

Dec 08, 2009 | 2004 Suzuki DR-Z 125

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