Question about 1996 Suzuki VS 1400 Intruder

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My clutch will not release completely i did bleed

My clutch will not release completely i did bleed the lines and changed the fluid

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  • Suzuki Master
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U need an internal adjustment by buying a manual-Clymer-or going to an independent ol school guy in town itz easy to do u mite need a new clutch also or try a cable adjust

Posted on Jul 31, 2009

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Need help bleeding clutch on my 05 v-rod


As the clutch wears the fluid level in the reservoir will rise so the initial fluid level should not exceed the FILL LEVEL. And the motorcycle must be upright and the handlebars set to level the fluid in the clutch reservoir.


When filling an empty clutch fluid line, a VACUUM BRAKE BLEEDER with a fitting that mates to the secondary clutch actuator bleeder screw threads can be used to draw the fluid down the clutch line and the air out of the system.


Take off the clutch fluid reservoir cover and then initially loosen the banjo bolt just enough to allow air bubbles to escape. Be careful because clutch fluid under pressure can squirt a steady stream a long way.


Hold the reservoir cover in place and pump the clutch hand lever 5 times or so and then hold the clutch hand lever against the handlebar and with a shop towel under the fitting loosen the banjo bolt and watch fro air bubbles to be released and then retighten the banjo fitting and only after it is tight release the hand lever. Check and refill the reservoir with fluid to the FILL LEVEL line and repeat the previous step three or more times and until only a steady flow of clutch fluid without air bubbles escapes from the banjo fitting at all times keeping the clutch fluid level in the reservoir at the FILL LEVEL with motorcycle in an upright position.


THEN remove the secondary clutch actuator cover, cover the exhaust pipe(s) with towels and place a suitable pan under the right side case to catch excess clutch fluid THEN while holding the reservoir cover in place pump the clutch hand lever 5 or more times, then hold the clutch hand lever against the handlebar and loosen the secondary clutch actuator bleed screw and watch the bleed screw for air bubbles. When the hand lever touches the hand grip hold it there without releasing it until the bleed screw has been tightened again and then release the hand lever., refill the fluid reservoir to the FILL LINE and repeat the previous steps, always keeping the fluid reservoir full of fluid, until a steady stream of fluid with no air bubbles coming from the bleed screw. When there is no more air coming out leave the bleeder screw tight and fill the reservoir with fluid to the FILL LINE.AUTION


THEN test pressure by squeezing clutch hand lever repeatedly does not build pressure in the hand lever and the fluid level does not remain at the FILL LINE then there is a leak somewhere and it will have to be located and fixed. If there is no visible leak check the secondary clutch actuator boot for leakage.


When there is no evidence of leakage and the clutch lever works properly and the fluid in the reservoir is at the FILL LINE install the reservoir cap and insert and tighten the fasteners to 0.7-0.9 Nm (6-8 in-lbs); the reservoir banjo bolt to 23-31 Nm (17-23 ft-lbs); the bleed screw to 9-11 Nm (80-100 in-lbs); the secondary clutch actuator cover fasteners to 6-10 Nm (53-88 in-lbs) and then test ride the motorcycle.


If the clutch does not have correct pressure you may have a dragging clutch and/or hard shifting.

Jun 12, 2014 | 2004 Harley Davidson VRSCA V-Rod

1 Answer

I have an 84 Honda shadow vt700. The clutch was working but would slip when hot it would get to where I could release clutch with bike in 1st gear and nothing would happen! It would just continue to idle!...


Bleeding the hydraulics will not improve the friction drive of the clutch in any way,your clutch drive plate is worn out and needs replacing. To bleed the hydraulic line ,make sure that the master cylinder is fully topped up,pump clutch lever several times then tie ,using a zip tie the clutch lever all the way to the handle bar,gently open the bleed screw and await fluid to start dripping from the bleed screw, this may take an hour or two but it will eventually bleed itself,once 25% of the fluid has discharged from the the master cylinder tighten up the bleed screw and this is the easiest DIY way of bleeding a hydraulic system, without a pressure bleeder.

May 04, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to bleed hydraulic clutch


Instructions:

1) The Hydraulic system should be bled to remove all the air whenever air enters the system. This occurs if the fluid level has been allowed to fall so low that air has been drawn into the clutch master cylinder. Under normal circumstances, air should not enter the system when the quick disconnect hydraulic line fittings have been disconnected. The procedure is very similar to bleeding a brake system, but depends mainly on gravity, rather than the pumping action of the pedal, for the bleeding effect.

2) Fill the master cylinder to the top with new brake fluid conforming to DOT 3 or DOT 4 specifications. Caution: Do not re-use any of the fluid coming from the system during the bleeding operation and don't use fluid from which has been inside an open container for an extended period of time.

3) Raise the vehicle and place it securely on jack stands or drive it securely up on ramps (whichever method you chose) to gain access to the bleeder valve, which is located on the top left side of the bellhousing (See Illustration 1-1 below). Try to keep the truck as level as possible. Caution: Don't forget to chock the rear wheels and set parking brake for extra safety...

4) Remove the dust cap which fits over the bleeder valve and push a length of clear plastic hose over the valve. Place the other end of the hose into a clear container.

5) Open the bleeder valve. Fluid will run from the clutch master cylinder, down the hydraulic line, into the release cylinder (the Slave Cylinder) and out through the clear plastic tube. Let the fluid run out until it is free of bubbles.
Note: Don't let the fluid level drop too low in the clutch master cylinder, or air will be drawn into the hydraulic line and the whole process will have to be started over.

6) Close the bleeder valve.

7) Open the bleeder valve and have an assistant slowly depress the clutch pedal allowing fluid to flow through the clear plastic hose. When the clutch pedal is almost to the floor, close the bleeder valve and have the assistant release the pedal.

8) Slowly press the pedal five times, waiting two (2) seconds each time the pedal is released. When releasing the pedal on this step, release it fast. This tends to help **** fluid down the stream and aid in faster bubble reduction.

9) Fill the fluid reservoir to the top.

10) The clutch should now be completely bled. If it isn't, (indicated by failure to disengage completely, and a soft or no pedal), repeat steps 5 through 9.

11) Continue this process until all air is evacuated from the system, indicated by a solid stream of fluid being ejected from the bleeder valve each time with no air bubbles in the hose or container.

12) Install the dust cap and lower the vehicle. Check carefully for proper operation before placing vehicle in normal service. Check the fluid level.

Note: If you can NOT get fluid out of the bleeder screw, then the internal check valve in your clutch master cylinder may be stuck, or you haven't bleed the system for at least 30 minutes. You will either have to use a different bleed technique, or replace the clutch master cylinder. Bleeding a Ranger clutch system takes time and patience. One small mistake / loss of patience / or shortcut, and you'll have to start all over.

Alternate Technique: (these provided by Dirk). Here is one way you can try that really worked great for him.

1) Disconnect the hose from the bottom of the fluid reservoir
2) Use a hand pump to manually force the fluid down the line.
3) Reconnect line to reservoir after process and fill fluid as needed.

Note: The reverse bleeding procedure will not work on all rangers. Some rangers' bleeder is nothing but a tapered hex bolt with a hole in it, no real way to get a good seal on it.

Jul 17, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How to bleed the clutch on a 1987 honda goldwing


Hello,

I did a search on Gold Wing problems and saw yours, unanswered for 2 months, and figured you have received your answer from somewhere else.

I will answer your question, just in case you haven't bled your clutch system yet. Just so you know, it is not necessary to bleed your clutch system unless your clutch feels spongy, you have had a leak somewhere in the system, you have had a component replaced, or you are changing the DOT 4 fluid.

1) Remove the dust cap from the bleed valve on the Clutch Slave Cylinder.
2) Connect a clear tube to the bleed valve on the Clutch Slave Cylinder - make sure you have a long enough length of tubing so that you can put a loop in the tubing higher than the bleed valve to prevent air from entering the system.
3) Place the other end of the tube into a clean container and fill the container with enough DOT 4 fluid to keep the end of the tube submerged.
4) Clean the top of the Clutch Master Cylinder and remove the screw holding the cover on. Remove the cover and the diaphragm.
5) Check the fluid level, and if low, fill the reservoir almost to the top line. Replace the diaphragm and cover and tighten the screws loosely.
6) Apply the Clutch Lever, slowly, several times and hold the lever in the applied position. Open the Bleed Valve and allow the Clutch Lever to compress completely. Tighten the Bleed Valve and release the Clutch Lever.

Repeat this step until all air bubbles are out of the system. NOTE: make sure to check the reservoir often to keep the fluid level full so air won't enter the system. When finished, make sure to keep the Clutch Lever pulled all the way in and tighten the bleed valve then replace the dust cap. If the lever still feels spongy, it will be necessary to repeat all the steps again until the Clutch Lever feels firm and gives the same feel each time it is applied.

Once you are finished bleeding the clutch system, make sure the fluid reservoir is full and tighten the screws on the cover. Do not apply too much force when tightening these screws as they have a tendency to strip.

If you are changing the fluid, open the bleed valve and keep apply the clutch until no fluid exits the bleed valve. You will need to follow the above steps to refill the clutch system with fluid.

Regards,

Oz

Nov 21, 2010 | 1987 Honda GL 1200 Aspencade Gold Wing

1 Answer

I have a 5 spped neon and the cluch started to go out on me driving how do i check the fluied on it i just buy it....


Dot 3 brake fluid is OK for topping up the master cylinder. However if the level is right down and the clutch pedal has become spongy then you will have to bleed the air out of the lines. A low level also indicates that the slave cylinder has developed a leak and may also need to be replaced.

Bleeding the system is as follows. It also helps if you have a length of clear plastic tubing that fits snugly over the tip of the bleed nipple, which makes it easier to see if there are any air bubbles still coming out.

1. Start with the Master Cylinder full of fluid. (Don't forget to check after a few bleeds that it stays above ¼ full so that you don't introduce more air into the line).

2. Have an assistant pump the clutch pedal 2 or 3 times, then hold down, keeping weight on the pedal as fluid is released.

3. Loosen bleed nipple to release any air & fluid.

4. Tighten nipple. Assistant then lets clutch pedal return. It may be necessary to manually pull back pedal if it does not return by itself.

5. Wait a few seconds then repeat the sequence from #2.

Bleeding is complete when no more air bubbles are visible in the fluid released from the bleed nipple. If clutch is still spongy you may have to repeat the bleeding after a few days driving. If the Slave cylinder does not have a bleed nipple the union nut that attaches the fluid pipe can be used for bleeding. However, it is a bit harder to observe when all air is purged and of course very messy as fluid will drip everywhere.

Oct 28, 2010 | 1998 Plymouth Neon

1 Answer

My clutch went out and i had a mechanic friend replace the part...its the part under the engine not the actual clutch but he cant get pressure back in the clutch and cant figure out if bleeding the system...


Bleeding the system is as follows. It also helps if you have a length of clear plastic tubing that fits snugly over the tip of the bleed nipple, which makes it easier to see if there are any air bubbles still coming out.

1. Start with the Master Cylinder full of fluid. (Don't forget to check after a few bleeds that it stays above ¼ full so that you don't introduce more air into the line).

2. Have an assistant pump the clutch pedal 2 or 3 times, then hold down, keeping weight on the pedal as fluid is released.

3. Loosen bleed nipple to release any air & fluid.

4. Tighten nipple. Assistant then lets clutch pedal return. It may be necessary to manually pull back pedal if it does not return by itself.

5. Wait a few seconds then repeat the sequence from #2.
Bleeding is complete when no more air bubbles are visible in the fluid released from the bleed nipple. If clutch is still spongy you may have to repeat the bleeding after a few days driving.

Oct 27, 2010 | 1988 Toyota Pickup

1 Answer

My clutch was wokin good and then all of a suddent there was no pressure on my clutch so i checked and it had to dot 3 fluid in it so i put sum in but it leaked it out rite away it came out on driverside...


It sounds like the rubber seal on the Clutch Slave Cylinder piston has completely failed. You will need to replace the Slave Cylinder Assembly. To replace, undo the union nut that attaches the pipe from the master cylinder and then undo the bolts that attach the assembly to the engine/transmission. Remove the push rod from the old cylinder and place in the new. Reattach Cylinder Assembly and pipe, making sure push rod engages in socket of clutch operating fork. Bleeding the system is as follows.

1. Start with the Master Cylinder full of fluid. (Don't forget to check after a few bleeds that it stays above ¼ full so that you don't introduce more air into the line). It also helps if you have a length of clear plastic tubing that fits snugly over the tip of the bleed nipple, which makes it easier to see if there are any air bubbles still coming out.

2. Have an assistant pump the clutch pedal 2 or 3 times, then hold down, keeping weight on the pedal as fluid is released.

3. Loosen bleed nipple to release any air & fluid.

4. Tighten nipple. Assistant then lets clutch pedal return. It may be necessary to manually pull back pedal if it does not return by itself.

5. Wait a few seconds then repeat the sequence from #2.

Bleeding is complete when no more air bubbles are visible in the fluid released from the bleed nipple. If clutch is still spongy you may have to repeat the bleeding after a few days driving. If the Slave cylinder does not have a bleed nipple the union nut that attaches the fluid pipe can be used for bleeding. However, it is a bit harder to observe when all air is purged and of course very messy as fluid will drip everywhere.

It also pays to check that the clutch pedal free travel is within specification (about ¼ inch measured at the pedal rubber) to ensure the hydraulic system works properly. This is done by adjusting the push rod that links the pedal arm to the piston in the master cylinder. Adjust by first loosening the locknut on the rod at the end where it attaches to the pedal arm and turning the rod in either direction to obtain the correct free travel. One adjusted retighten locknut.

Oct 12, 2010 | 1994 GMC Sierra

2 Answers

New performance clutch, new slave cylinder and master slave wont go in gear, and when in gear and pressing clutch vehicle wants to go


You may not have got all of the air out of the clutch line Try bleeding it again. The sequence is as follows:
1. Start with the Master Cylinder full of fluid. (Don’t forget to check after a few bleeds that it stays above ¼ full so that you don’t introduce more air into the line).
2. Have an assistant pump the clutch pedal 2 or 3 times, then hold down.
3. Loosen bleed nipple to release any air & fluid.
4. Tighten nipple. Assistant then lets clutch pedal return. It may be necessary to manually pull back pedal if it does not return by itself.
5. Wait a few seconds then repeat the sequence from #2.
Bleeding is complete when no more air bubbles are visible in the fluid released from the bleed nipple. It also helps if you have a length of clear plastic tubing that fits securely over the bleed nipple which makes it easier to see if there are any air bubbles.

Aug 20, 2010 | 1995 Eagle Talon

1 Answer

Hard time shifting. replaced clutch slave cylinder. still shifts hard. plenty of clutch fluid.


Sometimes the slave cylinder takes a little extra bleeding to remove the air in it & until it's all gone, the clutch won't open completely, causing the problem you are describing.

If the shifting can be done between all of the gears while the engine isn't running on level ground then the forks should be ok & not bent inside the transmission and you should be able to get the car to shift properly.

I've done several of these and found that if you start by making sure the Clutch Master cylinder is full, and remember when you add fluid, try to add without aerating the fluid. Pouring down the side of a funnel is better than pouring straight into the container as fluid picks up air during the splash. Hopefully doing it this way will prevent small new air bubbles from getting back into the lines when bleeding.

Next, after having one person pump the clutch pedal quickly 3 or 4 times & continuing to hold the pedal to the floor until you've completed this phase, instead of just releasing the pressure through the bleeder valve, also push on the clutch fork/rod to go ahead & force the fluid completely out of the slave cylinder, tighten the bleeder and have the assistant slowly pump the pedal to bring the slave cylinder back into contact to where it was before you pushed it to drain it. Refill & bleed as usual a couple of times. If you don't have a good clutch pedal now with good release, you need to check the Clutch Master Cyliinder since once the bleeding is done, this is a completely automatically adjusting system. good luck

Jan 31, 2010 | 1997 Chevrolet Cavalier

1 Answer

Replacing the Brake Fluid on the suzuki intruder


You may have a blocked clutch hose or a restricted outlet/leaking piston valve in the master cylinder. Remove the hose entirely and blow through it with compressed air. Good air flow means good hose. Now try the master cylinder (clutch lever), you should get a good flow of fluid with one press. If it barely releases anything, tear the cylinder down and check the outlet area and piston valving. It may need a rebuild kit or just replace the cylinder. Once you get the cylinder working, put the hose back and new fluid in the cylinder. work the lever a number of times, then bleed the system.






























































Aug 21, 2009 | 2000 Suzuki VS 1400 Intruder

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