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Is this the regulators progblem or alternators stator bad.

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In most cases it is the stator.

Posted on Dec 15, 2016

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2001 Ultra Classic Battery went bad had to jump it quit charging. have a new battery now only shows 10-12 volts on the meter tried a different regulator with same results. tried to check stater with...


usually it is either the regulator or stator that dies
firstly check stator...(alternator)...set multi mtr at 500ac volts
connect probes (red/blk) to both wires from stator..output voltage should read between 100 acv mid revs to 150 acv mid revs
output to battery should be 13.5v -14.75v dc...if not then regulator is RS ...I used to fit Honda regulators 30amp type with 2 red and 2 green wires ..because it is a 3 phase regulator just disconnect one yellow wire
harley regulators are of poor quality...they have no on off switch like the japanese ones ..in other words when you turn off your ignition the harley regulator is still on
hope this helps
MCS

Mar 08, 2015 | 2001 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

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Looking for help charging system not charging battery on 1999 Harley Davidson fatboy


Check regulator ground by using an ohmmeter with one lead on a known good ground, such as the battery ground cable, and the other on the regulator base.
The connection where the alternator stator wires plug into the regulator could be corroded/dirty and need to be cleaned and sprayed with electrical contact cleaner and protected with dielectric grease because corroded wires going to the battery or alternator from the stator or the regulator will affect the ability of the charging system to properly charge a battery.

Motorcycle voltage regulator connections must be clean and tight for proper operation so it must be verified that both the AC (stator) connections and the DC (battery supply side) connectors are clean, fully inserted and locked in place with the regulator latches (they should also be coated with dielectric grease to keep them clean and corrosion free).

The motorcycle voltage regulator is a series regulator that is also a rectifier that changes stator supplied alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) which the battery system requires. If the charging system does not keep the battery properly charged both with regards to Voltage (between 13 VDC minimum and 15.5 VDC maximum) and the current supply at a high enough amperage to meet the system lighting, ignition, TSM/TSSM, security and accessory requirements plus a minimum of 3.5 more amps (3.5 amps more than the foregoing system requirements) there are a number of tests that can be done to ascertain why.

As the voltage regulator must have a good, clean, tight (and otherwise secure) ground connection for proper operation a Voltage Regulator Ground Circuit Test can be accomplished by connecting an ohmmeter to a known good ground (like the battery negative post) and the case of the regulator. If there is continuity with little resistance the ground is GOOD and nothing more needs to be done BUT if there is NO continuity or there is more than minimal resistance the ground will need to be fixed so there is a low resistance continuity by either locating and fixing the poor ground or adding a new grounding wire from the regulator case to a know good ground.

A Voltage Regulator Power Circuit Test can be accomplished by turning OFF the Ignition, disconnecting the voltage regulator and with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting, testing for continuity between the voltage regulator wire harness supply terminal and the main fuse terminal (with the fuse removed) and if there is continuity present then the wiring circuit here is GOOD but if there is NO continuity then you will need to either find the open and repair it or replace the whole wire running from the voltage regulator to the main fuse.

As there should be no short circuit in the power supply from the regulator to battery (main fuse) wiring OR in the regulator internal circuitry continuity from these both need to be checked again with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting. If the regulator to main fuse wiring connector is not disconnected from the regulator you can connect an ohmmeter with one lead on the regulator supply wire terminal end at the main fuse (with the main fuse removed) and the other lead to a known good ground. If there is NO continuity then you know that both the supply wire and the regulator are okay (as there is no short to ground). BUT if there is continuity then either the regulator or wiring or both is/are shorted to ground. To determine where there is a short circuit (i.e. either the wiring or the regulator internal circuitry) you must disconnect the DC side of the wiring harness (the connector at the DC side of the regulator) from the regulator and test between either or both ends of the wire i.e. from the regulator wire harness.

AC Output Check
Disconnect the voltage regulator connector from the alternator stator wiring and then connect an AC voltmeter across both stator sockets of a two wire stator, or if a three wire stator across two of the three for example 1 & 3 and then later you will repeat the test between 2 & 3 and later between 1 & 2. THEN run the engine at as close as possible in the circumstances to 2000 RPM. The AC output should be approximately 32-40 VAC, approximately 16-20VAC per 1000 RPM. If you have done a stator static test and the stator has proven to be in good mechanical condition and the AC output is below specifications, the charging problem is going to be a faulty rotor. If you have not done a static stator check yet and the AC output is less than as set out above it may be that the stator is defective and the static stator check will need to be done. While the regulator has nothing whatsoever to do with the alternator output, if the alternator output is good the regulator might be defective in either rectification or in limiting the output to the battery to under 15 VDC. If AC output is low and the stator has passed the static stator check then it is likely that the permanent magnets in the alternator rotor are weak. A permanent magnet can lose its magnetic strength if it is dropped or shocked such as letting it snap into place when being installed or possibly by use of an impact wrench to remove the compensator fastener etc.

May 27, 2014 | Harley Davidson FLSTF - FLSTFI Fat Boy...

1 Answer

What is the stator on a motorcycle


The stator is the alternator as you would know it on a car. It is part of the charging system which consists of the battery, stator and a voltage regulator/rectifier.

Alternating current is generated by the stator and rectified to direct current. The voltage regulator then maintains the voltage to the battery and provides power for additional electrical loads, such as the lights and ignition system, at a constant voltage regardless of variations in engine speed.

May 08, 2014 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

Why battery not charging, test bat its good


Could be a bad regulator or alternator.

The connection where the alternator stator wires plug into the regulator could be corroded/dirty and need to be cleaned and sprayed with electrical contact cleaner and protected with dielectric grease because corroded wires going to the battery or alternator from the stator or the regulator will affect the ability of the charging system to properly charge a battery.

Check regulator ground by using an ohmmeter with one lead on a known good ground, such as the battery ground cable, and the other on the regulator base.

Current and Voltage Output Test
This test requires a load tester. As it appears that many shops/techs do not understand electricity and as they are relatively expensive testers many shops do not even have one. If you have one connect the negative and positive leads to the battery terminals, place the load tester induction pickup over the positive regulator cable and run the engine at 3000 RPM, increasing the load until a constant voltage reading of 13.0 VDC is obtained. At this point the current output should be 26 to 32 AMPS. Make a note of this reading as it will be used if a TOTAL CURRENT DRAW TEST will also be done. (A rider's riding habits, i.e. rpm of the engine while usual riding is being done could be significantly lower than 3000 RPM which would mean that less than the above optimal voltages would be produced so a rider in too high a gear for a given speed might have too low an operating RPM and thereby produce less current than is required to meet the bike's electrical load demands.)
CAUTION
Do not under any circumstances leave any load switch turned on for more than 20 seconds or overheating and tester damage are quite likely to occur.

Voltage Output Test
After removing the load, read the load tester voltage meter AND if voltage to the battery is not more than 15 VDC then voltage output is within specifications but if the voltage is higher then the regulator is not functioning properly or there are lose or dirty connections present.

AC Output Check
Disconnect the voltage regulator connector from the alternator stator wiring and then connect an AC voltmeter across both stator sockets of a two wire stator, or if a three wire stator across two of the three for example 1 & 3 and then later you will repeat the test between 2 & 3 and later between 1 & 2. THEN run the engine at as close as possible in the circumstances to 2000 RPM. The AC output should be approximately 32-40 VAC, approximately 16-20VAC per 1000 RPM. If you have done a stator static test and the stator has proven to be in good mechanical condition and the AC output is below specifications, the charging problem is going to be a faulty rotor. If you have not done a static stator check yet and the AC output is less than as set out above it may be that the stator is defective and the static stator check will need to be done. While the regulator has nothing whatsoever to do with the alternator output, if the alternator output is good the regulator might be defective in either rectification or in limiting the output to the battery to under 15 VDC. If AC output is low and the stator has passed the static stator check then it is likely that the permanent magnets in the alternator rotor are weak. A permanent magnet can lose its magnetic strength if it is dropped or shocked such as letting it snap into place when being installed or possibly by use of an impact wrench to remove the compensator fastener etc.

Rotor Inspection
Inspect the rotor for physical signs of damage. THEN remove center bolt and inspect for signs of the center hole having become oval and ensure that the stator bolts have not come loose and come into contact with the rotor.

May 08, 2014 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage...

1 Answer

Alternator not charging battery


ok first check the negative terminal and ensure you have a proper ground. then you have to check the stator and regulator / rectifier, you can check the stator which rarely goes bad by using a multi-meter on AC it should give you a voltage reading when cranking the bike over be careful you could get shocked now with the bike off check the regulator / rectifier by using the diode setting you can check to see if your rectifier is working use the leads and check the wires that come from the stator and the other lead on the wire that goes to the starter you will get voltage one way and the other you shouldn't so you will have to switch the leads. so if you get voltage both ways the regulator is bad or if you don't get voltage at al it is bad.

Oct 28, 2013 | Yamaha YZF-R1 Motorcycles

1 Answer

All the blogs are reporting heavy issues with the 06 street bob's toasting stators. i have joined the club. why did harley make it to be such a pain to get at and is there a real fix to the problem? people...


Unless Harley has changed something, they're still installing their stators exactly like they have since they went to the alternator engine in 1970. I'm not aware of any defect or recall concerning the stators on late model bikes. But even so, if your bike has 19K on it, it's out of warranty anyway.

There are a number of aftermarket alternator systems available if you're not satisfied with the Harley models. They are three phase systems and Cycle Electrics makes a good one. It is a complete system including the regulator. Since it is a three phase system, only their regulator will work with it. They are first rate and they are not cheap either.

Now, are you sure your problem is the stator? Have you checked to determine if it the stator bad or the regulator bad. Unplug the regulator where it plugs into the engine cases. Down inside the case, you'll see a pair of contacts. Using a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter), check the output of the stator. Put the meter's function switch in the AC VOLTS, 50 VOLT RANGE. Start the engine and connect one of the meter leads to each of the contacts down inside the plug. Bring the engine speed up to a high idle. You should read at least 30 volts. If so, your stator is fine but your regulator might be bad. If you read less than 30 volts or nothing at all, first make sure you did the test correctly. If you did it right and still nothing, you stator is indeed bad.

Now, I have heard of the rotors Harley has been producing lately as going bad. If your rotor has been working good up to now, I doubt it's gone bad. We had one instance where we installed a new OEM alternator and it had no output. Turned out the rotor had no magnetism in it. First time I ever saw anything like that but it happened.

Good Luck
Steve

Jan 16, 2011 | 2006 Harley Davidson FXDWGI Dyna Wide...

1 Answer

I am trying to convert a '63 Ford Galaxie 500 generator to an alternator. I am not sure how to do the wiring. The alternator has the following posts: Ground, Field, Battery, and Stator. My regulator is the...


best talk wit an accredited auto electrician as some alternators are internal voltage regulated and others are externally regulated
it will depend on the alternator you intend tofit

Apr 27, 2017 | Ford Five Hundred Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

New battery but still not charging. Is the regulator rectifier built into the alternator and are they servicable


Rectifier should be seperate and normally are about the size of the palm of your hand and have fins like a radiator. From your stator check for A/C voltage coming from your stator. No power = bad stator. If you have power check for bad grounds for rectifier or replace rectifier. 1st thing though is to check your battery cables...

Dec 30, 2009 | 1997 Yamaha XJR 1200

2 Answers

The generator light on my 76 cadillac deville comes on but slowly dims out when driving


sounds like alternator needs replacing, could have bad diodes,or regulator is going bad,

Oct 30, 2009 | 1976 Cadillac Deville

1 Answer

Ammeter at 11 volts. engine and battery lights on. New battery 2 months ago when starter got sluggish. How do I tell if it's battery, regulator or alternator?


If your metering only 11 volts you can have the battery load tested, but I doubt that is the problem. You don't have an alternator you have a stator. Find the lead that runs up to the regulator and unplug it, measure the stator side output. I don't know what the values are on your bike since you don't state the model but you should get a reading at idle and as you rev the motor the output should climb to around 14 volts. If it dosen't the stator is bad, if it does the problem is the regulator.

Jul 14, 2009 | 2003 Harley Davidson FLHT Electra Glide...

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