Question about 2004 Yumbo Dakar 200

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Throttle pin is out in carburetor. how to fix?

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  • 234 Answers

Usaly its in the slide and held in with a small clip it has groves in it so u can move it up and down to inprove performance

Posted on Jul 30, 2009

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How do I connect the throttle to the carburettor on la125100 series


THis provide that it still the Briggs 331877 on it
Install Carburetor
NOTE: Always replace air cleaner gaskets and carburetor mounting gaskets any time the carburetor has been removed for service.
1. Position new gasket on studs with long edge of gasket opposite fuel inlet of carburetor.
2. Hook governor spring in throttle lever hole without grommet. Hook governor link in throttle lever hole with grommet.
3. Hook choke link into outer hole of choke shaft from underneath. Slide other end of choke link into slot in governor control bracket.
4. Position carburetor on engine. Install Carburetor to intake screws or nuts and torque to 70 in- lbs
5. Connect fuel hose to carburetor and secure with hose clamp.
6. Using new gasket, install air cleaner assembly to carburetor.
Adjust carburetor, if applicable.
7. After final carburetor adjustment, use Knockout Pin #19135 to install new limiter cap with flat side facing up.

25359880-1x24cf2r4jb1m2gwzxarxemd-3-0.png

Jan 08, 2015 | Garden

2 Answers

Engine Rev goes too high while starting


have tried lubricating the throttle cable and twist grip mecanism , is the cable routed correctly and no kinks in it ? where the carb fits to the engine check the rubber mount has no cracks or holes as it will draw more air than needed !

Apr 14, 2014 | 2006 Bajaj Wind 125

2 Answers

How do i re-jet my carburetors on a 2007 suzuki LT-A 400F four wheeler?


when engines not running turn the gas off . And it sounds like you need to adjust your throttle pin that goes into the carb take the clip off the pin and move it down one good luck

Nov 23, 2012 | RTO 125cc ATV Quads Full Size Adult four...

1 Answer

My float is stuck and gas is leaking out "99 sportster" how to fix?


You must remove the float bowl from the bottom of the carb to get to the float. This can be done without removing the entire carburetor but it's not easy and there may be some other stuff you need to do. I'd remove the carburetor and clean the entire carb. Now, whether you are capable of doing this job or you need a professional mechanic to do the job is going to be left up to you. Carburetors are complicated pieces of equipment and must be put together correctly in order to work.

I'm going to assume that you bike still has the orig nial Keihen CV type carburetor on it. To remove the carb, loosen the large nut on the backside of the enricher cable and allow it to drop loose from it's holder. Remove the air filter and backing plate from the engine. Loosen the throttle cables at the adjusters and remove the cables from the carburetor. Remove the fuel hose. Then, pull the carb out of the intake manifold seal. Be sure to buy a replacement seal so you won't have any vacuum leaks.

Turn the carb upside down. You will see six screws on the bottom of the carb. There are three on one corner. One of those three is a long screw, take that one out and the ones on the other three corners of the float bowl. You may have to tap the float bowl with screwdriver handle to get it to come off. Once it's off, set it aside,

With the carb sitll upside down, you'll see a pin that the float pivots on. You must take this pin out but you'll need to start if out with a very small punch and small hammer. Once the pin moves, you can take it out by hand. Notice on one end of the pin that it has been flared. The pin comes out in that direction and goes back in the same way. Remove the pin and lift the float, with the needle hanging on it, out of the carb. Purchase a new needle and install it. Now, you can stop right here if everything looks good but it the carb is all gummed up on the inside, I'd take it to a professional mechanic and let them soak the carb and clean it.

Reinstall the carb in the opposite manner using a new manifold seal. Make certain that the throttle works like it should.

Good Luck
STeve

May 11, 2011 | Harley Davidson XLH Sportster 883 Hugger...

1 Answer

Hard to start. once it starts will not idle, acts as if the throttle is pinned open and runs full bore. When running full throttle on its own the kill switch will not shut the saw off.


Remove the carburetor cover and observe the action of the carburetor throttle arm as you actuate the throttle. If the arm doesn't move, disassemble the throttle trigger assembly (making part placement notes as you do so) and clean out any accumulation of sawdust/dirt. Make sure the cable or rod which connects it to the throttle arm will move--there should be spring return of the throttle arm to idle position. If this fixes the throttle problem, but the kill switch still doesn't work, you may have to remove the left side case to access the ignition module and the kill switch wire which plugs into the end of the module. The switch itself may be full of sawdust as well preventing contact to engine ground. Hope this helps!

Jan 07, 2011 | Garden

1 Answer

My rpm are very low car cut off unless i hoid the gas and no engine check ligth on .


Make sure the throttle body interior and throttle plate are clean and then check both the 1) idle air control valve and the 2) throttle position sensor:
1) Idle air control valve - How to check? Physically remove the IACV, keep the electrical connection to it and blank off the port to the intake plenum. Turn the engine on (you will need a little accelerator pedal pressure to keep her running) and examine the IACV valve movement in response to additional loads (power steering inputs etc). The valve should open and close according to demand which when fitted would cause change in engine speed with increased power demand made on the engine.

The electrical connector to the IACV can have 2 or 4 pins:-

2 pins: resistance between pins should about 10 OHMS +/- 3 OHMS. Resistance between either of the pins and the valve body is greater than 10,000 OHMS

4 pins: resistance between diagonally positioned pins should be about 20 OHMS


How to fix? If the motor of the IACV has failed then replace it. If the valve is gummed closed by baked oil and carbon then clean it thoroughly with carburetor choke cleaner spray and a cloth. Similarly if the entry and exit ports on the throttle body to the IACV look blocked again clean them out thoroughly.



2) Throttle position sensor - How to check? The socket for electrical connection with the TPS has 3 pins, one for 'ground', one for 5 volts 'reference' and a third (generally the middle one) for 'signal' output. Back probe the signal pin in the connector to the TPS. Attach the positive lead of a voltmeter to the probe and measure the voltage output as the throttle plate is rotated. If working correctly the meter should show a voltage consistent with the throttle position from approximately 1 volt when closed and 5 volts when fully open. What is looked for is smooth voltage increase with throttle change. If there are drop outs in the transition or that there is no transition seen the TPS is faulty.



How to fix? If the track is dirty causing drop outs, try cleaning it with residue-free electrical cleaning spray. If the track is worn it is perhaps easiest to replace the complete device. In some instances it may be possible to adjust the location of the central mount of the TPS contact arm along the throttle shaft by a few millimeters and in the process cause a fresh concentric region of track to be used.

Nov 19, 2010 | 1996 Ford Explorer

1 Answer

Mower wont stay running


Hello nater357:

>>From your Description it Sounds like a Bad Carburetor Solenoid, Restricted Carburetor Passages or a Stuck Carburetor Float Needle Valve.
>>The Following is a Basic Instruction File I made for Checking the Carburetor Solenoid. Any Input is Appreciated.
>>**Check for Current/Voltage (10.5 VDC Minimum) to the Carburetor Shut Off Solenoid. If the Carburetor Shut Off Solenoid has Current, then On Some Solenoids you can Remove the Needle and Replace the Solenoid to Test them.
>>****PLEASE DO NOT OPERATE THE MOWER WITH THE SOLENOID BYPASSED IN THIS MANNER. THIS IS "ONLY" FOR TESTING.****
>>For Others, Remove the Carburetor Solenoid and Go to the Hardware Store. Purchase a Bolt of the Same Diameter and Threads. It Needs to be 1/2" to 3/4" Long for the Horizontal Mount Solenoids and 1/4" to 1/2" Long for the Vertical Mount Solenoids. Put this Bolt in Place of the Solenoid. If this Corrects the Engine Problem, then Replace the Solenoid.
>>***NOTE: THIS IS FOR CHECKING THE SOLENOID ONLY I NEVER SUGGEST YOU OPERATE THE ENGINE WITH THE SOLENOID OUT OF THE CARBURETOR EXCEPT FOR TESTING PURPOSES***
>>Sometimes the Plunger is Moving, Just Not Far Enough to Allow the Gas to Enter the Jet Properly.** **Use 440 Wet Dry Sand Paper and Engine Oil to Clean the Pin. Wet the Sand Paper with Oil Until it is Flexible and then Lightly Polish the Pin. There is Some Slop/Free Play in the Solenoid Pin. Usually the Electromagnet is Simply Not Pulling the Pin as it Should or there is a Small Bur on the Pin. Use 440 Wet Dry Sand Paper and Engine Oil to Clean the Pin. Wet the Sand Paper with Oil Until it is Flexible and then Lightly Polish the Pin. Clean and Lightly Oil the Pin before Inserting it Back into the Solenoid. Just a Film of Oil is All it Takes.**
>>If the Carburetor Solenoid is Good, then
>>The Following is a Basic File I Made for Cleaning Carburetors. Any Input is Appreciated. Even though the Carburetor Looks Clean, the Internal Passages May be Restricted with Varnish that Gas Causes to Build Up over Time.
>>Spray Cleaners Remove this Varnish in Layers, so Soaking is the Only Sure Way to Remove ALL this Varnish.
>>I have Found that Most People can Use a Breakdown/IPL and Disassemble the Carburetor Enough for Proper Cleaning.
>>You Only have to Remove the Bowl (if Applicable), Float Pin (if Applicable), Float (if Applicable), Needle Valve.
Remove Any Adjustment Screws that Go Into the Carburetor Body. The Welch Plugs Do Not have to be Removed.
>>If you are Able to Remove and Disassemble the Carburetor and Keep the Gaskets Intact, then Usually these Gaskets can be Reused. The Only Parts you May Need to Replace is the Needle Valve.
>>The Float Needle Usually is Not Replaced Unless it is Not Operating Properly (the gas flow not shutting off and the carburetor is Flooding). Do Not Remove the Main Nozzle. This is a Pressed Fit and Removal is Not Required for Cleaning. Soaking and Blowing the Carburetor Out After Soaking will Clean the Nozzle.
>>Once Disassembled, then Soak the Carburetor Body and Parts in a 1 Gallon Can of Gunk Carburetor Cleaner Overnight. The Can has a Parts Tray Inside it for the Small Parts.
>>Once the Carburetor and Parts are in the Cleaner, you can Replace the Lid for Safety and to Prevent Accidental Spillage. Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air.
>>***(Do Not Use High Pressure Air for the Zama Carburetors, they have Check Valves for the Primer and these are Usually Blown Out of the Carburetor if Not Careful. Allow the Zama Carburetor to Set on a Drip Pan and Dry)***.
>>****All the Carburetor Adjustments are the Same for Lawn Mower and Trimmers. There are Several Location for the Air Mixture Screws. The Idle Air Mixture Screws are Usually Located at the Top of the Carburetor Bowl and the Top of the Carburetor Body.****
>>If the Main Air and Idle Air Mixture Screws are Side by Side on the Side of the Carburetor, then the Idle Air is Nearest the Engine. The Main Jet Air Mixture Screw is Located in the Bottom of the Carburetor Bowl or Beside the Idle Air Screw on the Side of the Carburetor Body.
>>Some of the Older Model Carburetors have the Main Jet Mixture Screw Straight in from the Top of the Carburetor Body (this is Rare anymore). If you have Cleaned the Carburetor (Disassembled and Soaked Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk). Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air and Install a New Kit if Required. Now Setting the Air Mixture Screws:
>>****Turn the Idle Air and Main Air Mixture Screws In Until SNUG **Do Not Jam** Then Reverse Both Screws 1 1/2 Turns. Holding the Throttle Full Open, Start the Engine. Turn the Main Air Mixture Screw Clockwise Until Proper Revs are Obtained. Occasionally you May have to Turn this Counter Clockwise to Achieve the Proper Revs. Now Allow the Engine to Idle. Set the Engine Idle Screw (Not Idle Air) so the Engine will Stay Running if Required. Now Set the Idle Air Mixture Screw so there is No Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle. Reset the Engine Idle if Required.****
>>If This Carburetor has a Single Air Adjustment (Except Tank Mounted 9200 and 100900 Engine Model Carburetors), Use the Section Above that Pertains to Full Throttle RPM Air Mixture Screw and then Adjust the Screw if Required to Eliminate Any Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle.
>>For the 9200 Model Tank Mounted Carburetor Adjust the Air Mixture Screw Full In, then Reverse 1 1/2 Turns. Set the Throttle Lever to Full Throttle and Start the Engine.
>>Now Carefully Use 1 Finger and Open the Throttle Plate and Over Rev the Engine Slightly. If the Engine Over Revs and Does Not Struggle to Over Rev, then the Carburetor is Set. If the Engine Struggles to Over Rev, then Turn the Adjustment Screw In 1/4 Turn and Repeat the Over Rev Test.
>>If you Adjust to 1/2 Turns In and the Engine Still Struggles to Over Rev, then Return the Adjustment Screw to 1 1/2 Turns Out from Snug and Turn the Screw Out 1/4 Turn. Do the Over Rev Test. Continue this Process Until you have the Engine Over Revving without Struggle.
>>By Adjusting the Carburetor on this Style Carburetor Until the Engine Over Revs without Struggle, you have Adjusted the Air Mixture to the Best Possible Setting.
>>This file was Intended to Give you the Basic Carburetor Cleaning Instructions and May Not Reflect Your Carburetor Components.
>>If you have Questions, Please Ask. The links above Provide Good Directions on Cleaning the Carburetor. Make sure you use an Compressed Air to Blow through all the Carburetor Passages to make sure they are Clear.
>>1- http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmclctc.htm
>>2- http://www.cpdonline.com/692509.pdf .
Please, Do Not Hesitate, If I Missed Something or you Hit a Snag or this Does Not Correct the Problem, I am Here if You Require More Assistance.
Hope this Helps. Let me Know What Happens, Please. May the All Mighty Bless You and Yours. Be Safe and Be Happy. Thanks.

Good Luck

Respectfully

jbridger (John)

May 15, 2009 | Craftsman 42 in. Deck 19.5hp Lawn Tractor

1 Answer

No start


Hello djb4297:

Not knowing the Make or Model of the Engine; I am Sending a Basic File for Checking the Carburetor.
>>The Following is a Basic Instruction File I made for Checking the Carburetor Solenoid. Any Input is Appreciated.
>>**Check for Current/Voltage (10.5 VDC Minimum) to the Carburetor Shut Off Solenoid. If the Carburetor Shut Off Solenoid has Current, then On Some Solenoids you can Remove the Needle and Replace the Solenoid to Test them.
>>****PLEASE DO NOT OPERATE THE MOWER WITH THE SOLENOID BYPASSED IN THIS MANNER. THIS IS "ONLY" FOR TESTING.****
>>For Others, Remove the Carburetor Solenoid and Go to the Hardware Store. Purchase a Bolt of the Same Diameter and Threads. It Needs to be 1/2" to 3/4" Long for the Horizontal Mount Solenoids and 1/4" to 1/2" Long for the Vertical Mount Solenoids. Put this Bolt in Place of the Solenoid. If this Corrects the Engine Problem, then Replace the Solenoid.
>>***NOTE: THIS IS FOR CHECKING THE SOLENOID ONLY I NEVER SUGGEST YOU OPERATE THE ENGINE WITH THE SOLENOID OUT OF THE CARBURETOR EXCEPT FOR TESTING PURPOSES***
>>Sometimes the Plunger is Moving, Just Not Far Enough to Allow the Gas to Enter the Jet Properly.** **Use 440 Wet Dry Sand Paper and Engine Oil to Clean the Pin. Wet the Sand Paper with Oil Until it is Flexible and then Lightly Polish the Pin. There is Some Slop/Free Play in the Solenoid Pin. Usually the Electromagnet is Simply Not Pulling the Pin as it Should or there is a Small Bur on the Pin. Use 440 Wet Dry Sand Paper and Engine Oil to Clean the Pin. Wet the Sand Paper with Oil Until it is Flexible and then Lightly Polish the Pin. Clean and Lightly Oil the Pin before Inserting it Back into the Solenoid. Just a Film of Oil is All it Takes.**
If No Carburetor Solenoid, then the Carbureotor Float Needle Valve is Sticking and I Suggest you Soak and Clean the Carburetor.
>>The Following is a Basic File I Made for Cleaning Carburetors. Any Input is Appreciated. Even though the Carburetor Looks Clean, the Internal Passages May be Restricted with Varnish that Gas Causes to Build Up over Time.
>>Spray Cleaners Remove this Varnish in Layers, so Soaking is the Only Sure Way to Remove ALL this Varnish.
>>I have Found that Most People can Use a Breakdown/IPL and Disassemble the Carburetor Enough for Proper Cleaning.
>>You Only have to Remove the Bowl (if Applicable), Float Pin (if Applicable), Float (if Applicable), Needle Valve.
Remove Any Adjustment Screws that Go Into the Carburetor Body. The Welch Plugs Do Not have to be Removed.
>>If you are Able to Remove and Disassemble the Carburetor and Keep the Gaskets Intact, then Usually these Gaskets can be Reused. The Only Parts you May Need to Replace is the Needle Valve.
>>The Float Needle Usually is Not Replaced Unless it is Not Operating Properly (the gas flow not shutting off and the carburetor is Flooding). Do Not Remove the Main Nozzle. This is a Pressed Fit and Removal is Not Required for Cleaning. Soaking and Blowing the Carburetor Out After Soaking will Clean the Nozzle.
>>Once Disassembled, then Soak the Carburetor Body and Parts in a 1 Gallon Can of Gunk Carburetor Cleaner Overnight. The Can has a Parts Tray Inside it for the Small Parts.
>>Once the Carburetor and Parts are in the Cleaner, you can Replace the Lid for Safety and to Prevent Accidental Spillage. Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air.
>>***(Do Not Use High Pressure Air for the Zama Carburetors, they have Check Valves for the Primer and these are Usually Blown Out of the Carburetor if Not Careful. Allow the Zama Carburetor to Set on a Drip Pan and Dry)***.
>>****All the Carburetor Adjustments are the Same for Lawn Mower and Trimmers. There are Several Location for the Air Mixture Screws. The Idle Air Mixture Screws are Usually Located at the Top of the Carburetor Bowl and the Top of the Carburetor Body.****
>>If the Main Air and Idle Air Mixture Screws are Side by Side on the Side of the Carburetor, then the Idle Air is Nearest the Engine. The Main Jet Air Mixture Screw is Located in the Bottom of the Carburetor Bowl or Beside the Idle Air Screw on the Side of the Carburetor Body.
>>Some of the Older Model Carburetors have the Main Jet Mixture Screw Straight in from the Top of the Carburetor Body (this is Rare anymore). If you have Cleaned the Carburetor (Disassembled and Soaked Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk). Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air and Install a New Kit if Required. Now Setting the Air Mixture Screws:
>>****Turn the Idle Air and Main Air Mixture Screws In Until SNUG **Do Not Jam** Then Reverse Both Screws 1 1/2 Turns. Holding the Throttle Full Open, Start the Engine. Turn the Main Air Mixture Screw Clockwise Until Proper Revs are Obtained. Occasionally you May have to Turn this Counter Clockwise to Achieve the Proper Revs. Now Allow the Engine to Idle. Set the Engine Idle Screw (Not Idle Air) so the Engine will Stay Running if Required. Now Set the Idle Air Mixture Screw so there is No Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle. Reset the Engine Idle if Required.****
>>If This Carburetor has a Single Air Adjustment (Except Tank Mounted 9200 and 100900 Engine Model Carburetors), Use the Section Above that Pertains to Full Throttle RPM Air Mixture Screw and then Adjust the Screw if Required to Eliminate Any Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle.
>>For the 9200 Model Tank Mounted Carburetor Adjust the Air Mixture Screw Full In, then Reverse 1 1/2 Turns. Set the Throttle Lever to Full Throttle and Start the Engine.
>>Now Carefully Use 1 Finger and Open the Throttle Plate and Over Rev the Engine Slightly. If the Engine Over Revs and Does Not Struggle to Over Rev, then the Carburetor is Set. If the Engine Struggles to Over Rev, then Turn the Adjustment Screw In 1/4 Turn and Repeat the Over Rev Test.
>>If you Adjust to 1/2 Turns In and the Engine Still Struggles to Over Rev, then Return the Adjustment Screw to 1 1/2 Turns Out from Snug and Turn the Screw Out 1/4 Turn. Do the Over Rev Test. Continue this Process Until you have the Engine Over Revving without Struggle.
>>By Adjusting the Carburetor on this Style Carburetor Until the Engine Over Revs without Struggle, you have Adjusted the Air Mixture to the Best Possible Setting.
>>This file was Intended to Give you the Basic Carburetor Cleaning Instructions and May Not Reflect Your Carburetor Components.
>>If you have Questions, Please Ask. The links above Provide Good Directions on Cleaning the Carburetor. Make sure you use an Compressed Air to Blow through all the Carburetor Passages to make sure they are Clear.
>>1- http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmclctc.htm
>>2- http://www.cpdonline.com/692509.pdf .
Please, Do Not Hesitate, If you Hit a Snag or this Does Not Correct the Problem, I am Here if You Require More Assistance.
Hope this Helps. Let me Know What Happens, Please. May the All Mighty Bless You and Yours. Be Safe and Be Happy. Thanks.

Good Luck

Respectfully

jbridger (John)

May 13, 2009 | Mtd Garden

1 Answer

Gas not getting to engine, briggs & stratton edger model #25A-588A129 530-959, engine will not start, when gas put in (took spark plug out put small amount of gas in) engine turned over for few...


Hello

From your Description it Sounds like a Carburetor Problem.
>>The Following is a Basic Instruction File I made for Checking the Carburetor Solenoid. Any Input is Appreciated.
>>**Check for Current/Voltage (10.5 VDC Minimum) to the Carburetor Shut Off Solenoid. If the Carburetor Shut Off Solenoid has Current, then On Some Solenoids you can Remove the Needle and Replace the Solenoid to Test them.
>>****PLEASE DO NOT OPERATE THE MOWER WITH THE SOLENOID BYPASSED IN THIS MANNER. THIS IS "ONLY" FOR TESTING.****
>>For Others, Remove the Carburetor Solenoid and Go to the Hardware Store. Purchase a Bolt of the Same Diameter and Threads. It Needs to be 1/2" to 3/4" Long for the Horizontal Mount Solenoids and 1/4" to 1/2" Long for the Vertical Mount Solenoids. Put this Bolt in Place of the Solenoid. If this Corrects the Engine Problem, then Replace the Solenoid.
>>***NOTE: THIS IS FOR CHECKING THE SOLENOID ONLY I NEVER SUGGEST YOU OPERATE THE ENGINE WITH THE SOLENOID OUT OF THE CARBURETOR EXCEPT FOR TESTING PURPOSES***
>>Sometimes the Plunger is Moving, Just Not Far Enough to Allow the Gas to Enter the Jet Properly.** **Use 440 Wet Dry Sand Paper and Engine Oil to Clean the Pin. Wet the Sand Paper with Oil Until it is Flexible and then Lightly Polish the Pin. There is Some Slop/Free Play in the Solenoid Pin. Usually the Electromagnet is Simply Not Pulling the Pin as it Should or there is a Small Bur on the Pin. Use 440 Wet Dry Sand Paper and Engine Oil to Clean the Pin. Wet the Sand Paper with Oil Until it is Flexible and then Lightly Polish the Pin. Clean and Lightly Oil the Pin before Inserting it Back into the Solenoid. Just a Film of Oil is All it Takes.**
If the Carburetor Solenoid is Good, then
>>The Following is a Basic File I Made for Cleaning Carburetors. Any Input is Appreciated. Even though the Carburetor Looks Clean, the Internal Passages May be Restricted with Varnish that Gas Causes to Build Up over Time.
>>Spray Cleaners Remove this Varnish in Layers, so Soaking is the Only Sure Way to Remove ALL this Varnish.
>>I Suggest you Make Sure the Gas is Free Flowing to the Carburetor Inlet Port (if the Model does Not have a Fuel Pump). If the Gas is Free Flowing to the Inlet Port, then
>>**Remove, Disassemble and Soak the Carburetor Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk).
>>The Primer Bulb is Held in Place with a Locking Collar at the Base of the Primer Bulb. Use a Small Flat Screw Driver and Carefully Pry the Lock Ring Up in Small Amounts All Around the Lock Ring until the Lock Ring and Primer Bulb can be Removed from the Carburetor Body. Usually a New Primer Bulb is Required when you have to Soak the Carburetor. The Rubber is Usually Rotted to Much for the Primer to be Reused.
>>Your Primer Bulb May Differ Slightly, but Removal is Usually Almost the Same Except for the Primer Bulbs that are Bolted to the Carburetor. These are Simply Unbolted and Changed with the new Primer Bulb.
>>I have Found that Most People can Use a Breakdown/IPL and Disassemble the Carburetor Enough for Proper Cleaning.
>>You Only have to Remove the Bowl (if Applicable), Float Pin (if Applicable), Float (if Applicable), Needle Valve and Needle Valve Seat if Applicable. This is a Flat O-Ring Located in the Inlet Port the Float Needle Rests in. Use a Strong Wire with a Slight Bend to Remove the Old Seat. Sometimes a Small Pocket Screw Driver can be Use Also.
>>The New Seat will have a Slightly Beveled Side and a Flat Side. The Flat Side goes Towards the Carburetor Body when Inserted into the Inlet Port. Spray the Seat with Spray Lubricant to make Installation Easier. The End of a Drill Bit that is Slightly Small than the Seat can be Use as an Insertion Tool.
>>Wear Gloves or Use a Rag when Handling the Sharpened End of the Drill Bit. Remove Any Adjustment Screws that Go Into the Carburetor Body. The Welch Plugs Do Not have to be Removed.
>>If you are Able to Remove and Disassemble the Carburetor and Keep the Gaskets Intact, then Usually these Gaskets can be Reused. Even the O-Ring Around the Bowl can be Reused if it is Not Broken. The Only Parts you May Need to Replace is the Float Needle Valve (and Seat if Applicable).
>>The Float Needle Usually is Not Replaced Unless it is Not Operating Properly (the gas flow not shutting off and the carburetor is Flooding). Do Not Remove the Main Nozzle. This is a Pressed Fit and Removal is Not Required for Cleaning. Soaking and Blowing the Carburetor Out After Soaking will Clean the Nozzle.
>>Once Disassembled, then Soak the Carburetor Body and Parts in a 1 Gallon Can of Gunk Carburetor Cleaner Overnight. The Can has a Parts Tray Inside it for the Small Parts.
>>Once the Carburetor and Parts are in the Cleaner, you can Replace the Lid for Safety and to Prevent Accidental Spillage. Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air.
>>***(Do Not Use High Pressure Air for the Zama Carburetors, they have Check Valves for the Primer and these are Usually Blown Out of the Carburetor if Not Careful. Allow the Zama Carburetor to Set on a Drip Pan and Dry)***.
>>****All the Carburetor Adjustments are the Same for Lawn Mower and Trimmers. There are Several Location for the Air Mixture Screws. The Idle Air Mixture Screws are Usually Located at the Top of the Carburetor Bowl and the Top of the Carburetor Body.****
>>If the Main Air and Idle Air Mixture Screws are Side by Side on the Side of the Carburetor, then the Idle Air is Nearest the Engine. The Main Jet Air Mixture Screw is Located in the Bottom of the Carburetor Bowl or Beside the Idle Air Screw on the Side of the Carburetor Body.
>>Some of the Older Model Carburetors have the Main Jet Mixture Screw Straight in from the Top of the Carburetor Body (this is Rare anymore). If you have Cleaned the Carburetor (Disassembled and Soaked Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk). Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air and Install a New Kit if Required. Now Setting the Air Mixture Screws:
>>****Turn the Idle Air and Main Air Mixture Screws In Until SNUG **Do Not Jam** Then Reverse Both Screws 1 1/2 Turns. Holding the Throttle Full Open, Start the Engine. Turn the Main Air Mixture Screw Clockwise Until Proper Revs are Obtained. Occasionally you May have to Turn this Counter Clockwise to Achieve the Proper Revs. Now Allow the Engine to Idle. Set the Engine Idle Screw (Not Idle Air) so the Engine will Stay Running if Required. Now Set the Idle Air Mixture Screw so there is No Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle. Reset the Engine Idle if Required.****
>>If This Carburetor has a Single Air Adjustment (Except Tank Mounted 9200 and 100900 Engine Model Carburetors), Use the Section Above that Pertains to Full Throttle RPM Air Mixture Screw and then Adjust the Screw if Required to Eliminate Any Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle.
>>For the 9200 Model Tank Mounted Carburetor Adjust the Air Mixture Screw Full In, then Reverse 1 1/2 Turns. Set the Throttle Lever to Full Throttle and Start the Engine.
>>Now Carefully Use 1 Finger and Open the Throttle Plate and Over Rev the Engine Slightly. If the Engine Over Revs and Does Not Struggle to Over Rev, then the Carburetor is Set. If the Engine Struggles to Over Rev, then Turn the Adjustment Screw In 1/4 Turn and Repeat the Over Rev Test.
>>If you Adjust to 1/2 Turns In and the Engine Still Struggles to Over Rev, then Return the Adjustment Screw to 1 1/2 Turns Out from Snug and Turn the Screw Out 1/4 Turn. Do the Over Rev Test. Continue this Process Until you have the Engine Over Revving without Struggle.
>>By Adjusting the Carburetor on this Style Carburetor Until the Engine Over Revs without Struggle, you have Adjusted the Air Mixture to the Best Possible Setting.
>>This file was Intended to Give you the Basic Carburetor Cleaning Instructions and May Not Reflect Your Carburetor Components.
>>If you have Questions, Please Ask. The links above Provide Good Directions on Cleaning the Carburetor. Make sure you use an Compressed Air to Blow through all the Carburetor Passages to make sure they are Clear.
>>1- http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmclctc.htm
>>2- http://www.cpdonline.com/692509.pdf .
Please, Do Not Hesitate, If you Hit a Snag or this Does Not Correct the Problem, I am Here if You Require More Assistance.
Hope this Helps. Let me Know What Happens, Please. May the All Mighty Bless You and Yours. Be Safe and Be Happy. Thanks.

Good Luck

Respectfully

jbridger (John)

May 10, 2009 | Garden

1 Answer

Lawn mower not getting gas


Hello

Did you Soak the Carburetor or Just Use Spray Cleaner? If Spray Cleaner was Used, then the Carburetor can Still be the Cause.
1- >>The Following is a Basic Instruction File I made for Checking the Carburetor Solenoid. Any Input is Appreciated.
>>**Check for Current/Voltage (10.5 VDC Minimum) to the Carburetor Shut Off Solenoid. If the Carburetor Shut Off Solenoid has Current, then On Some Solenoids you can Remove the Needle and Replace the Solenoid to Test them.
>>****PLEASE DO NOT OPERATE THE MOWER WITH THE SOLENOID BYPASSED IN THIS MANNER. THIS IS "ONLY" FOR TESTING.****
>>For Others, Remove the Carburetor Solenoid and Go to the Hardware Store. Purchase a Bolt of the Same Diameter and Threads. It Needs to be 1/2" to 3/4" Long for the Horizontal Mount Solenoids and 1/4" to 1/2" Long for the Vertical Mount Solenoids. Put this Bolt in Place of the Solenoid. If this Corrects the Engine Problem, then Replace the Solenoid.
>>***NOTE: THIS IS FOR CHECKING THE SOLENOID ONLY I NEVER SUGGEST YOU OPERATE THE ENGINE WITH THE SOLENOID OUT OF THE CARBURETOR EXCEPT FOR TESTING PURPOSES***
>>Sometimes the Plunger is Moving, Just Not Far Enough to Allow the Gas to Enter the Jet Properly.** **Use 440 Wet Dry Sand Paper and Engine Oil to Clean the Pin. Wet the Sand Paper with Oil Until it is Flexible and then Lightly Polish the Pin. There is Some Slop/Free Play in the Solenoid Pin. Usually the Electromagnet is Simply Not Pulling the Pin as it Should or there is a Small Bur on the Pin. Use 440 Wet Dry Sand Paper and Engine Oil to Clean the Pin. Wet the Sand Paper with Oil Until it is Flexible and then Lightly Polish the Pin. Clean and Lightly Oil the Pin before Inserting it Back into the Solenoid. Just a Film of Oil is All it Takes.**
2->>The Following is a Basic File I Made for Cleaning Carburetors. Any Input is Appreciated. Even though the Carburetor Looks Clean, the Internal Passages May be Restricted with Varnish that Gas Causes to Build Up over Time.
>>Spray Cleaners Remove this Varnish in Layers, so Soaking is the Only Sure Way to Remove ALL this Varnish.
>>I Suggest you Make Sure the Gas is Free Flowing to the Carburetor Inlet Port (if the Model does Not have a Fuel Pump). If the Gas is Free Flowing to the Inlet Port, then
>>**Remove, Disassemble and Soak the Carburetor Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk).
>>The Primer Bulb is Held in Place with a Locking Collar at the Base of the Primer Bulb. Use a Small Flat Screw Driver and Carefully Pry the Lock Ring Up in Small Amounts All Around the Lock Ring until the Lock Ring and Primer Bulb can be Removed from the Carburetor Body. Usually a New Primer Bulb is Required when you have to Soak the Carburetor. The Rubber is Usually Rotted to Much for the Primer to be Reused.
>>Your Primer Bulb May Differ Slightly, but Removal is Usually Almost the Same Except for the Primer Bulbs that are Bolted to the Carburetor. These are Simply Unbolted and Changed with the new Primer Bulb.
>>I have Found that Most People can Use a Breakdown/IPL and Disassemble the Carburetor Enough for Proper Cleaning.
>>You Only have to Remove the Bowl (if Applicable), Float Pin (if Applicable), Float (if Applicable), Needle Valve and Needle Valve Seat if Applicable. This is a Flat O-Ring Located in the Inlet Port the Float Needle Rests in. Use a Strong Wire with a Slight Bend to Remove the Old Seat. Sometimes a Small Pocket Screw Driver can be Use Also.
>>The New Seat will have a Slightly Beveled Side and a Flat Side. The Flat Side goes Towards the Carburetor Body when Inserted into the Inlet Port. Spray the Seat with Spray Lubricant to make Installation Easier. The End of a Drill Bit that is Slightly Small than the Seat can be Use as an Insertion Tool.
>>Wear Gloves or Use a Rag when Handling the Sharpened End of the Drill Bit. Remove Any Adjustment Screws that Go Into the Carburetor Body. The Welch Plugs Do Not have to be Removed.
>>If you are Able to Remove and Disassemble the Carburetor and Keep the Gaskets Intact, then Usually these Gaskets can be Reused. Even the O-Ring Around the Bowl can be Reused if it is Not Broken. The Only Parts you May Need to Replace is the Float Needle Valve (and Seat if Applicable).
>>The Float Needle Usually is Not Replaced Unless it is Not Operating Properly (the gas flow not shutting off and the carburetor is Flooding). Do Not Remove the Main Nozzle. This is a Pressed Fit and Removal is Not Required for Cleaning. Soaking and Blowing the Carburetor Out After Soaking will Clean the Nozzle.
>>Once Disassembled, then Soak the Carburetor Body and Parts in a 1 Gallon Can of Gunk Carburetor Cleaner Overnight. The Can has a Parts Tray Inside it for the Small Parts.
>>Once the Carburetor and Parts are in the Cleaner, you can Replace the Lid for Safety and to Prevent Accidental Spillage. Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air.
>>***(Do Not Use High Pressure Air for the Zama Carburetors, they have Check Valves for the Primer and these are Usually Blown Out of the Carburetor if Not Careful. Allow the Zama Carburetor to Set on a Drip Pan and Dry)***.
>>****All the Carburetor Adjustments are the Same for Lawn Mower and Trimmers. There are Several Location for the Air Mixture Screws. The Idle Air Mixture Screws are Usually Located at the Top of the Carburetor Bowl and the Top of the Carburetor Body.****
>>If the Main Air and Idle Air Mixture Screws are Side by Side on the Side of the Carburetor, then the Idle Air is Nearest the Engine. The Main Jet Air Mixture Screw is Located in the Bottom of the Carburetor Bowl or Beside the Idle Air Screw on the Side of the Carburetor Body.
>>Some of the Older Model Carburetors have the Main Jet Mixture Screw Straight in from the Top of the Carburetor Body (this is Rare anymore). If you have Cleaned the Carburetor (Disassembled and Soaked Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk). Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air and Install a New Kit if Required. Now Setting the Air Mixture Screws:
>>****Turn the Idle Air and Main Air Mixture Screws In Until SNUG **Do Not Jam** Then Reverse Both Screws 1 1/2 Turns. Holding the Throttle Full Open, Start the Engine. Turn the Main Air Mixture Screw Clockwise Until Proper Revs are Obtained. Occasionally you May have to Turn this Counter Clockwise to Achieve the Proper Revs. Now Allow the Engine to Idle. Set the Engine Idle Screw (Not Idle Air) so the Engine will Stay Running if Required. Now Set the Idle Air Mixture Screw so there is No Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle. Reset the Engine Idle if Required.****
>>If This Carburetor has a Single Air Adjustment (Except Tank Mounted 9200 and 100900 Engine Model Carburetors), Use the Section Above that Pertains to Full Throttle RPM Air Mixture Screw and then Adjust the Screw if Required to Eliminate Any Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle.
>>For the 9200 Model Tank Mounted Carburetor Adjust the Air Mixture Screw Full In, then Reverse 1 1/2 Turns. Set the Throttle Lever to Full Throttle and Start the Engine.
>>Now Carefully Use 1 Finger and Open the Throttle Plate and Over Rev the Engine Slightly. If the Engine Over Revs and Does Not Struggle to Over Rev, then the Carburetor is Set. If the Engine Struggles to Over Rev, then Turn the Adjustment Screw In 1/4 Turn and Repeat the Over Rev Test.
>>If you Adjust to 1/2 Turns In and the Engine Still Struggles to Over Rev, then Return the Adjustment Screw to 1 1/2 Turns Out from Snug and Turn the Screw Out 1/4 Turn. Do the Over Rev Test. Continue this Process Until you have the Engine Over Revving without Struggle.
>>By Adjusting the Carburetor on this Style Carburetor Until the Engine Over Revs without Struggle, you have Adjusted the Air Mixture to the Best Possible Setting.
>>This file was Intended to Give you the Basic Carburetor Cleaning Instructions and May Not Reflect Your Carburetor Components.
>>If you have Questions, Please Ask. The links above Provide Good Directions on Cleaning the Carburetor. Make sure you use an Compressed Air to Blow through all the Carburetor Passages to make sure they are Clear.
>>1- http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmclctc.htm
>>2- http://www.cpdonline.com/692509.pdf .
Please, Do Not Hesitate, If you Hit a Snag or this Does Not Correct the Problem, I am Here if You Require More Assistance.
Hope this Helps. Let me Know What Happens, Please. May the All Mighty Bless You and Yours. Be Safe and Be Happy. Thanks.

Good Luck

Respectfully

jbridger (John)

May 10, 2009 | Garden

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