Question about Motorcycles

1 Answer

I have a 2003 Yamaha. put a brand new battery,voltage regulator and the stater and checked the main ground.it will idle for a few mins then the battery is drained. It will not charge. Any help!?!?!?

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Master:

    An expert who has achieved Level 3.

  • Master
  • 436 Answers

I would guess you have a bad replacement regulator or stater. Even though they are new, they can still be faulty. Have them tested first before venturing into other areas. Trust your firs repair and verify your new parts are good. One or the other will be bad, probably not both.

Posted on Apr 04, 2015

Ad

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad
  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: harley davidson dyna low rider 2003 battery does not last when ri

I had this problem on my ultra clasic. I found a ground wire loose. you will have to locate all ground wires. and don,t frget the one on the battery.

Posted on Nov 30, 2008

  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: 2001 yamaha r6 keeps going dead! Stator,regulator or something?

you need to check for a short if its not that then it could be your altinator or a regulator box

Posted on Jan 07, 2009

Benimur
  • 6966 Answers

SOURCE: Charging system on 2002 yamaha v star.

I posted back in your initial post here. A few ideas to consider/try:

  • normally, there would be 3 wires coming from the stator going to the regulator;
  • AC voltage measured on any pairing of these wires would be higher than 12 depending on the RPM above 1200;
  • DC voltage output would tend to vary from 12 to 13.8/14.2 depending on the RPM;
  • the best check would be to install temporarily anammeter inline with the wire coming from the regulator going to the +terminal of the battery. With this, the presence/absence of thecharging current could be checked.
Cheers.

Posted on Feb 13, 2009

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: yamaha rxs 100cc note on horn alters when indicators or brakes on

check all your male and female connections on your wires for corrosion and also make sure they are matching with the right colour coated wire

Posted on Apr 25, 2009

czaa
  • 4525 Answers

SOURCE: Voltage Regulator Problem?

u want to chec alternator as well-ther r test u can do so buy a clymer manual which r very detailed-iv seen hd books in library sec 629

Posted on Aug 19, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

New battery goes dead after riding 2007 yamaha v star classic charge battery engine cranks cut off and dead again


Hi, Anonymous in order to check out any main electrical system, you have to start with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better, and be able to pass a load test if necessary.
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
2. Check the voltage drop at the battery when you hit the starter button, anything below 9 volts you might have a faulty battery.
3. Check voltage at the battery with the bike running at 3,600 RPM should be 14.3 to 14.7 volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you might have a faulty voltage regulator.
4. Make sure voltage regulator is "GROUNDED" and functioning properly, watch the video below on how to test a voltage regulator.
5. Unplug the connector to the alternator and hook your multimeter leads to the alternator (pin/socket selection does not matter) set the multimeter to AC volts, at an idle the multimeter should read 16 to 20 volts AC. at 2,000 RPM 32 to 40 AC volts, 3,000 RPM 48 to 60 AC volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you may have a faulty rotor, follow step 6
6. Set the multimeter to OHM'S, connect one lead to the alternator (any pin/socket) and the other to a ground, the multimeter should read infinity. Connect both leads to the alternator multimeter should read 0.1 to 0.2 OHM'S. If you are not getting these numbers, you have a bad stator.
7. Check all wiring in the charging circuit for worn or chaffed spots and all wiring connectors in the circuit for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets, which is the # 1 offender.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
Battery not Charging Yamaha Star Forum
http://www.sloneservices.com/SilverBack/Other-Stuff/VS-1100-chagre-syst.pdf
98 00 Yamaha XV650 Star Service Manual XVS650 Moto Data Project
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://www.starmotorcycles.com/assets/service/manuals/2003/LIT-11626-16-05_22.pdf

Apr 12, 2014 | Yamaha V Star Classic Motorcycles

1 Answer

Battery will not stay charged


Hi, Anonymous in order to check out any main electrical system, you have to start with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better, and be able to pass a load test if necessary. "WARNING" never plug or unplug any electrical connector with the engine running !!!
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
2. Check the voltage drop at the battery when you hit the starter button, anything below 9 volts you might have a faulty battery.
3. Check voltage at the battery with the bike running at 3,600 RPM should be 14.3 to 14.7 volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you might have a faulty voltage regulator.
4. Make sure voltage regulator is "GROUNDED" and functioning properly, watch the video below on how to test a voltage regulator.
5. Unplug the connector to the alternator and hook your multimeter leads to the alternator (pin/socket selection does not matter) set the multimeter to AC volts, at an idle the multimeter should read 16 to 20 volts AC. at 2,000 RPM 32 to 40 AC volts, 3,000 RPM 48 to 60 AC volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you may have a faulty rotor, follow step 6
6. Set the multimeter to OHM'S, connect one lead to the alternator (any pin/socket) and the other to a ground, the multimeter should read infinity. Connect both leads to the alternator multimeter should read 0.1 to 0.2 OHM'S. If you are not getting these numbers, you have a bad stator.
7. Check all wiring in the charging circuit for worn or chaffed spots and all wiring connectors in the circuit for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets, which is the # 1 offender.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://www.r1-forum.com/forums/4-mechanical-help/118481-battery-wont-stay-charged.html
2007 2008 Yamaha r1 STATOR FAULT not charging Regulator Rectifier location...
https://r1videos.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/2002-2003-yamaha-r1-service-manual.pdf
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-yz-owners-manuals

Sep 22, 2013 | Yamaha YZF-R1 Motorcycles

1 Answer

03 wr 250 is blowing light bulbs


Hi, Dean the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website 1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
2004 wr250f blowing bulbs
03 WR450 lights blowing
YAMAHA WR250F Owner Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-wr-owners-manuals

Nov 08, 2012 | 2003 Yamaha WR 250 F

1 Answer

My XV535 1987 Virago Bike has a new battery and the bike runs until it drains the battery I checked the voltage at IDLE it was 12.05 v and at revving up 12.96 V so I checked online and ordered


Hi, Anonymous in order to check out any main electrical system, you have to start with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better, and be able to pass a load test if necessary. "WARNING" never plug or unplug any electrical connector with the engine running !!!
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
2. Check the voltage drop at the battery when you hit the starter button, anything below 9 volts you might have a faulty battery.
3. Check voltage at the battery with the bike running at 3,600 RPM should be 14.3 to 14.7 volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you might have a faulty voltage regulator.
4. Make sure voltage regulator is "GROUNDED" and functioning properly, watch the video below on how to test a voltage regulator.
5. Unplug the connector to the alternator and hook your multimeter leads to the alternator (pin/socket selection does not matter) set the multimeter to AC volts, at an idle the multimeter should read 16 to 20 volts AC. at 2,000 RPM 32 to 40 AC volts, 3,000 RPM 48 to 60 AC volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you may have a faulty rotor, follow step 6
6. Set the multimeter to OHM'S, connect one lead to the alternator (any pin/socket) and the other to a ground, the multimeter should read infinity. Connect both leads to the alternator multimeter should read 0.1 to 0.2 OHM'S. If you are not getting these numbers, you have a bad stator.
7. Check all wiring in the charging circuit for worn or chaffed spots and all wiring connectors in the circuit for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets, which is the # 1 offender.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://viragohelp.com/virago-charging-systems
Testing three phase alternator stator regulator rectifier charging system
Yamaha XV 535 DX Virago Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://www.starmotorcycles.com/assets/service/manuals/2000/LIT-11626-13-16_110.pdf

Aug 28, 2012 | 1988 Yamaha XV 535 Virago DX

1 Answer

Ttr 230 wont start with new battery


Hi, Grant the following is a comprehensive charging system test that is guaranteed to the find issue with your system.
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
My TTR230 won start plz help
What to Do Check When Dirt Bike Won Start
Yamaha ttr230 Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
Yamaha TT R230 Owner Manual

Jun 18, 2012 | 2010 Yamaha TTR230

1 Answer

My yamaha r6s charging system is not charging


Hi, Camryn in order to check out any main electrical system, you have to start with a fully charged battery 12.5 volts or better, and be able to pass a load test if necessary. "WARNING" never plug or unplug any electrical connector with the engine running !!!
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
2. Check the voltage drop at the battery when you hit the starter button, anything below 9 volts you might have a faulty battery.
3. Check voltage at the battery with the bike running at 3,600 RPM should be 14.3 to 14.7 volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you might have a faulty voltage regulator.
4. Make sure voltage regulator is "GROUNDED" and functioning properly, watch the video below on how to test a voltage regulator.
5. Unplug the connector to the alternator and hook your multimeter leads to the alternator (pin/socket selection does not matter) set the multimeter to AC volts, at an idle the multimeter should read 16 to 20 volts AC. at 2,000 RPM 32 to 40 AC volts, 3,000 RPM 48 to 60 AC volts. If you are not getting these numbers, you may have a faulty rotor, follow step 6
6. Set the multimeter to OHM'S, connect one lead to the alternator (any pin/socket) and the other to a ground, the multimeter should read infinity. Connect both leads to the alternator multimeter should read 0.1 to 0.2 OHM'S. If you are not getting these numbers, you have a bad stator.
7. Check all wiring in the charging circuit for worn or chaffed spots and all wiring connectors in the circuit for corroded, broken, or loose pins/sockets, which is the # 1 offender.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
Yamaha R6 battery charging problem
http://www.r6messagenet.com/forums/r6-maintenance-technical/724-charging-problems-stator-rectifier.html
1999 2002 Yamaha YZF R6 Service Manual R6 Moto Data Project
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-yz-owners-manuals

May 08, 2012 | 2001 Yamaha YZF-R6

1 Answer

MY 1980 YAMAHA WONT CHARGE MY BATTERY I'LL CHARGE IT AND THE BIKE WILL ONLY RUN FOR ABOUT 15 MINS.I PUT A BRAND NEW BATTERY IN IT.I WAS WONDERING HOW TO TEST THE STATOR / ALTENATOR AND THE Regulator /...


Hi, Wbrett40 before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage and must be replaced AGM types more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://www.motorcycleforum.com/59-motorcycle-repair/90678-xs400-charging-problem-well-not-charging-problem.html
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
Yamaha XS360 Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-xs-owners-manuals

Aug 27, 2011 | 1980 Yamaha XS 400

1 Answer

I Have A '95 Harley Sportster 1200 That Wont Charge. The Stater Is Putting Out 43 volts,, I Changed The Regulator (new), New Battery This Spring,, Also New Coil. I Checked The Breakers n They All Seem...


If the stator is putting out 43 volts AC and you have a new regulator, you should be reading between 14.5 and 15.0 volts DC at the battery when the engine is at a high idle. Check the voltage regulator for a good ground. I always put one of those "star" type lockwashers between the frame and the regulator on both mounting bolts to make sure it's got a good ground. The rest of the stuff you mentioned (coil, breaker, ect) don't have anything to do with the charging. There should be a red wire going to the positive post of the battery along with the large battery cable that goes to the starter. Make sure this wire has a good connection. Your regulator has three wires that come from it. Two go to a plug from the stator and one goes to the battery. The schematic I have shows it going through the main fuse.

good luck
Steve

Jul 27, 2011 | Harley Davidson XL 1200 S Sportster Sport...

1 Answer

82 Yamaha xs400 maxim. I keep burning up CDI. New CDI and bike runs great. If it goes on a long run (over 45 min), the idle speeds up and the next day the CDI is dead. I put and old one back that runs for...


Hi,
The CDi usually breaks down when it gets an over voltage from the voltage regulator.
Try to replace the voltage regulator so that the CDi won't overheat.
Check also the ignition coil, it might have a short circuit it the connection terminal or the polarity is wrongly placed.
Thanks for using FixYa!

Jul 11, 2011 | 1982 Yamaha XS 400

2 Answers

Yw50 battery goes dead ==not a battery problem suggestions


Hi and welocme to FixYa,

Offhand, check the fuses, wires & connectors for looseness, corrosion or pittings/burnt marks; scrape clean and tighten as necessary.

Should the fuse, wiring & connectors check out, then the voltage regulator could be suspect. This could be checked by measuring (with a voltmeter) the battery's voltage before start, on idle and while revving. Compare readings: with engine off, battery voltage should be 12 + volts, on idle should be less than 13 volts and while revving should go high with a maximum of 14.5 volts or thereabouts. If the voltage is below 12 at idle or and will not go up while revving, then the voltage regulator would require replacement (most likely).  It must be pointed out that in some instances, it could be the stator (least likely).

Good luck and thank you for asking FixYa.

Aug 15, 2009 | 2006 Yamaha MT-01

Not finding what you are looking for?
Motorcycles Logo

Related Topics:

77 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Motorcycles Experts

Arnie Burke
Arnie Burke

Level 3 Expert

4525 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76164 Answers

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

Are you a Motorcycle Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...