Question about Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide Ultra Classic Motorcycles

1 Answer

Can I replace the stock 45 amp charging system on my 2002 FLHTCUI with a 50 amp high output system like the newer models have?

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    New Friend:

    An expert that has 1 follower.

  • Contributor
  • 6 Answers

Yes you can, no problem. The battery will (theorically) recharge a little faster but the main advantage would be if you use more electricity with gismos like high intensity bulbs or heating vest. However you should not use a charger more power than 20% higher than the original as then your abttery could overheat or even overcharge.

Hope this help !

Posted on Nov 19, 2014

Ad

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
A 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
The service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad
  • 2712 Answers

SOURCE: Electrical system acting up at high RPM

halogen headlight taillight/brake light turn signals odo/speedo and horn. Here are the problems… Above about 6000 RPM the ignition will intermittently cut out. It doesn’t do it all the time. The higher the RPM the more it tends to cut out. Reducing RPM brings the lights back to bright. Above about 6000 RPM the lights start to dim intermittently. The higher the RPM the dimmer they get to where the lights almost go out. The engine runs fine if the RPM is reduced. The tachometer records some very high RPMS when the system starts to act up. Max RPM recorded is 19999 which is totally unreasonable. I am looking for some assistance in troubleshooting my electrical system and how to isolate the problem(s).,Start by disconnecting the cables from the generator coils and start up your engine. Problem still there? Do this to find out if your problems stems from the power side or the ignition side. If bike now runs fine, I'd look at the voltage regulator. Have you checked that all your connectors are ok? A grounding problem with a somewhat loose connector would be vibration sensitive, hence the problems at higher rpm. Is your stator plate securely fastened? Is your engine grounded to chassis? There might be a loose fastening in one of you engine mounts. Reply With Quote,,,

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

wd4ity
  • 4565 Answers

SOURCE: what size axle on a 2002 flhtcui

I'm pretty sure that the axle diameter on your bike is one inch as compared to 3/4" on earlier models.

Posted on Dec 13, 2009

wd4ity
  • 4565 Answers

SOURCE: 2000 flhtcui after driving couple hours my charging system drops

Are you sure your gauge is not lying to you? Ride the bike until you see that your charging voltage has dropped. Then check the voltage directly across the battery with a meter. If it is indeed below the 14 volt mark, you are either drawing too much current or your alternator is not putting out enough.

To check the alternator, unplug the regulator where it plugs into the engine case. Down inside the plug in the case, you'll see either two sockets or two pins. Using a digital volt ohm meter (DVOM) put one lead to pin or socket and the other lead to the other pin or socket. Put the meter in the 50 volt AC range. The voltage coming out of the alternator is AC voltage, not DC. It is converted to DC by the regulator. Start the engine an bring the engine up to a high idle. You should read 32-40 volts AC. If so, you stator is good and working as it should.

Now, you're left with either something drawing too much current or a bad regulator. The book tells you how to check the regulator but you must use a specific type of meter or you'll get erronous readings. If you have added a lot of extra lights to the bike, this could be overworking the alternator. Check the ground on the regulator to the frame. It must be grounded well.

Posted on Apr 06, 2010

  • 623 Answers

SOURCE: 2002 FLHTCUI Electra Glide Ultra Classic: What's approx. cost for a stator / regulator repla...

HD = Hundred Dollars, voltage regulator.
Stator replacement = big dollars because labor intensive. The part is around $100, maybe more by now

Sorry

Posted on May 17, 2010

wd4ity
  • 4565 Answers

SOURCE: Trying to decide if my 2002 flhtcui is a stock

The only way to tell is to remove the cam chest cover and take a look.

Steve

Posted on Oct 28, 2010

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

2007 Yamaha Vino 50 not charging


If the problem is in the battery you better change it.You may find OEM or less expensive variant - replacement battery - this is the correct replacement Yamaha 50CC XC50 Vino Classic 2006 2012 Motorcycle Battery 12V 4 5Ah . Here are some helpful videos about how to access and replace the battery (the place of the battery depends on the scooter's model).

Oct 15, 2017 | 2007 Yamaha Vino Classic

1 Answer

Sym Jet euro X 50 charging problems. I've changed the r/r and the stator but the battery still won't charge. What do I do now? Any help please


Hi, Jamie before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead-acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
5. Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
6. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from the regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from the regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads for viewing or printing that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Charging problems on SYM euro 50x Scooter Doc Forum
http://symforum.com/index.php?topic=2625.0
Sym Jet 50 Service Manual
Sym JET EURO EU2 50 cc 2004 Parts
Sym JET 50 series Owner Manual

Sep 28, 2017 | Sym Motorcycles

1 Answer

Amp Gauge goes all the way past the highest number


amp gauge, and you forgot high number, 30, 60 , 80 , 100 amps?
and did it go left or right, one way is discharge other is charging.
key facts all.?????
no year,
no statement of , if car is stock or not.
if someone added a gauge, here,

back in the olden days, before the way better volt meter.
they had Amp gauges, many we ADD on.
most are wrong size. too. and installed WRONG. (ask correct way)
if the alt dies, the ammeter goes negative amps showing disgnarge ammount,
when runing right it ill be in the posative direction, charging battey
or at 0amps, battery is charged.
all this depends on how its installed.
if put in the alternator lead (big) it will only show alternator output.
10 to 50amps, 10 is typical. 50 be dead battery, running.

Feb 23, 2014 | Jeep Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2002 Honda Shadow VT 750 won't stay charged, new battery


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
5. Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
6. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Battery won stay charged
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
Honda 1998 VT750C Service Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda VT750C Owner Manual

Aug 28, 2013 | 2002 Honda VT 750 CD Shadow A.C.E. Deluxe

1 Answer

2002 Honda VT 750 CD Shadow not charging


Hi, Ronald before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead-acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
5. Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
6. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from the regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from the regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads for viewing or printing that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
charging system ACE Help Needed
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
Honda 1998 VT750C Service Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda VT750C Owner Manual

Aug 18, 2013 | 2002 Honda VT 750 CD Shadow A.C.E. Deluxe

1 Answer

2002 Honda GL 1800 Gold Wing not charging


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead-acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
5. Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
6. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from the regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from the regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads for viewing or printing that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
2002 GL1800 Goldwing Alternator fuse GL1800 Information Questions...
Trouble Shooting Goldwing Not Charging
Honda GL1800 Service Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda Goldwing GL1800 Owner Manual

Sep 03, 2017 | 2002 Honda GL 1800 Gold Wing

1 Answer

2002 FLHTCUI diagnostic codes


I went to a more trouble than I usually do to answer this because it is a frequent question. In general, a halfway decent HD service department will plug in their Scanalyzer, tell you what the trouble code is and what it means and reset the ECM at no charge. If they want to charge you for doing this, then find another dealer. My daughter is a board certified physician and she makes less than half of what these blood suckers charge per hour.

Make sure the ignition is off. Locate the Data Link plug. Identify pins 1 & 2. Use a female spade connector to short out pins 1 & 2. Turn the ignition switch to on. Engine check light comes on for 8 seconds. After that, the check light will count off the trouble code. If you have resolved the problem associated with the trouble code, then the solid check engine light after ignition on will shut off after 50 - 100 starts, depending upon the model year of the ECM installed on your bike.

Good luck.
11070442-5zh0ctlbbc304sal2ncdwp4d-4-0.png

11070442-5zh0ctlbbc304sal2ncdwp4d-4-1.png

11070442-5zh0ctlbbc304sal2ncdwp4d-4-3.png

Jan 01, 2012 | 2002 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

2002 Honda VT 750 CD Shadow not charging


Hi, Truckingdadd before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
5. Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
6. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from the regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from the regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads for viewing and printing that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
charging system ACE Help Needed
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
Honda 1998 VT750C Service Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda VT750C Owner Manual

May 09, 2010 | 2002 Honda VT 750 CD Shadow A.C.E. Deluxe

2 Answers

Where is the fuse inside the power supply model fsp200


The unit is only 200watt and the fuse cost about $2,Thats if there one built into it,
The replacement power supply is about $20-00 NZD
Probably 20minutes to fix (for a novice) depending on their skill level and tools available,

BEST ADVICE Replace it

Power is something you dont want to mess with because it can kill.
The power packs are replaceable but people arent.
Be very careful and dont mess with the power.

I am an Electrician and I respect power.Misterdj

Mar 24, 2010 | AOpen (FSP200-60SAV) 200-Watt Power Supply

Not finding what you are looking for?
Motorcycles Logo

Related Topics:

67 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Harley Davidson Experts

Arnie Burke
Arnie Burke

Level 3 Expert

4825 Answers

Mike

Level 3 Expert

4348 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

79186 Answers

Are you a Harley Davidson Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...