Question about 2001 Ducati 996 S

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2000 Ducati 996S Fork Rebuild

I need to know the recommended fork oil weight, I am an ex-pro roadracer and I normally use 5wt (I weigh 150 lbs) in my other bikes.

I also need to know recommended fork oil height or amount, and I can adjust as I tune the suspension at the track.

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  • Ducati Master
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How can you be an ex-pro? Other than the manufacturer, your guess is beetter than anyone else..

Posted on Jul 02, 2009

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Looking for replacement light alloy rims. 26" v2100 genesis mountain bike, ultra light rims 21 speed


What rim you need has too many variables (width of tire to be used, your weight, balance of road/off-road usage and roughness of off-road use, budget, etc.) that you have not mentioned for anyone to give an appropriate recommendation.

Secondly, unless the rims are both bent it's a waste of money and effort to replace them, as good quality rims and spokes alone (a new rim may need different length spokes) could cost almost as much as the original cost of the bike ($119), let alone when you add labor.

Finally, worrying about "ultra light" rims, especially on a bike that weighs 35+ lbs, is useless. Shaving off ounces when the bike and rider together could weigh 200 lbs. is not going to make it faster or easier to pedal.

Sep 28, 2016 | Mountain Cycling

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What viscosity and how much Fork oil


If you are rebuilding your Forks, I would STRONGLY RECOMMEND replacing the fluid with Synthetic (last Longer) and is cleaner for the internal Valves... Viscosity will fine tune your suspension. you need to take into consideration your location, your riding weight and riding habits... The lower the number the more action, the Higher the number, the slower the response and harder ride but when you take into consideration Weight and Normal Ambient Temperatures... You need to dial in your own number...

Mar 03, 2014 | 1997 Honda Steed

1 Answer

Do you think that MOTOBIKE mobils can be a perfect lubricant for MOUNTAINBIKE SUSPENSION FORKS??


You can use the same lubricants as long as they match the specifications for your Mountain bike fork. Each manufacture of fork will provide a list of recommended weights and types for the specific fork model.

In general the mountain bike will use a much lighter weight lubricant and the heat resisitance needs are far less. So in general the Motorbike suspension fluids will be too heavy.

The Fork that is pictured in the bike represented will not work well with Motorbike oils but if you have a different fork it might.

Dec 09, 2010 | Columbia Sportswear Columbia Anzer Peak...

1 Answer

Fork capacity on 1991 KX 250


SILKOLENE PRO RSF 5WT or use
SILKOLENE FORK OIL LIGHT
500-MLS OIL EACH LEG

Mar 10, 2010 | 2003 kawasaki KX 250

1 Answer

I need fork oil wt. and amount


SILKOLENE PRO RSF 5WT or use
SILKOLENE FORK OIL LIGHT
500-MLS OIL EACH LEG thanks buddy

Nov 01, 2009 | 2005 kawasaki KX 250

2 Answers

What are the fork oil specs for a 1999 Yamaha YZ 250? Is there some mathmatical equation to figure this out that would work on most bikes? Does weight or riding style play a part? I would like to find out...


Well you have indeed come to an interesting subject, and there is a lot to work out on correct viscosity and choosing the right oil with at least a viscosity index of at least 150(the higher the index number,the less likely it is going to change with temp),but I won't go into that now.

Here is a basic sort of 'rule of thumb' that has worked for me as a good starting point for trail/MX larger forks with long travel (inverted or standard)from 125 upwards is +/- 200cc of ATF(AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION FLUID).

I would not recommend SAE oil as something marked 5wt can actually be more viscous than another oil marked 7.5wt.Yamaha recommend S1 suspension oil and I would assume that this would be the correct oil for your bike ,but failing to get this you can use Mobil 1 ATF fork fluid or alternatively just standard ATF which you can probably get at your local garage.

Your bike I think is 195cc of S1 for each fork.
The heavier the person riding, the pre-load should be increased or if not the facility for this you can fit spacers /change springs and visa-verse for a lighter bloke.Most modern bikes have simple screws where you can change the compression damping etc. to suit the application ,but older bikes you need to change the oil to less/more viscous or re-valve them.

I hope this has answered your questions.

Please get back to me if you need more help




Aug 07, 2009 | 2003 Yamaha YZ 250

1 Answer

What are the stock suspension settings for a 2003 Honda CR 250 R?


set your compression out 10 or 11 your rebound 9 or 10 and your fork oil height to roughtly 380cc.since its in 03 u should drain the fork oil out, u have to unscrew the top cap of the fork while its in the triple clamps( because its easier this way), loosen then take the fork out of the clamps, unscrew the top caps and pull the fork tube down and turn the fork upside down to drain the oil out then hang the forks up upside down for about 15 minutes then add the new oil right in the fork tube were you'll see a spring, just add the oil in there and you'll be fine and u should replace it with a good medium weight oil

Feb 04, 2009 | 2003 Honda CR 250 R

1 Answer

Fork Oil for ETV CAPONORD


front and rear. Panniers were full tankbag was full no topbox riding solo. THE BIKE originally shipped 20 weight oil for the forks. That was much to stiff for me. I talked with them and they suggested trying 15 weight and that 10 would probably be too soft. I tried the 15 weight and it was improved but still pretty harsh especially on small bumps. A friend with lots of experience related that he uses Silkolene 2.5 weight in his sport touring bikes (such as his Honda Hurricane and Ducati ST4). I installed 4 weight (actually aircraft hydraulic fluid, previously known to old Beemer riders as Aeroshell 4). I LOVE IT!! Compression damping is just fine. Rebound damping might be a tiny amount too little, but not enough to matter. Even dive under heavy braking is reasonable....much less than with the stock springs. ,It is difficult to get the right oil viscosity for everyone. Typically I ride 2up with wife, 400# plus gear, plus luggage, easily 440-450# total load. Even under those circunstances I may try W15 next time, but for sure not less. The Dutch WP is working with BMW, supplying the shocks and spring for the new K1200 S /R /PowerCup models. WP engineers (like Hyperpro) have designed a retrofit to the Front Springs for the Capo, as well as a rear shock. BTW, by coincidence those front springs are progressive too. They recommend from 5 to 20, depending on the typical bike loading. I suggest a look into the WP website, good stuff there. Here I am pasting some info from WP: ...the progressively wound Pro-Line front fork springs of WP Suspension play a fundamental role in the operation of your front fork. The springing and damping characteristics of your front fork can be fully optimised if the correct springs are used. Many motorcyclists know the problem of too soft front fork springs which can result in bottoming of the front fork when braking or too much movement and poor handling of the front fork during braking and acceleration. Original front fork springs can also be too hard which causes the front fork to shock the steering and the entire bike to feel uncomfortable on uneven road surfaces. With the WP Pro-Line front fork springs you are taking the first step towards optimum road holding at an attractive price. The springs, progressively wound from high-grade silicon chrome spring steel, ensure that your front fork will respond better (improved comfort), and react more controllable when compressed under braking (more stability, resulting in greater safety). In most cases motorcycle manufacturers use linear wound front fork springs which are often in the beginning but also at the end of the stroke, either to soft or to hard. Progressivity is lacking. With progressively wound WP springs you can solve this problem, once and for all. __________________ ,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2004 Aprilia ETV 1000 Caponord

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