Question about 2006 Yamaha Royal Star Tour Deluxe

1 Answer

Sluggish We live in Dayton Nv and when we ride our bike up to Lake Tahoe or even a higher mountain, our bike seems to have little power to climb the mountain and backfires. My husband weighs about 300 lbs and I about 150 lbs, so we know that is a lot of weight for the bike to carry, but someone told us that shouldn't matter. What would you do to give the bike more power?? Also, the bike seats are not confortable, and my leggs always hurt by the middle of the ride. Is that because of the placement of the foot pegs?? We have heard that the Mustang seat is the only way to go, but it's so expensive, and we are nervous it might not do the trick. Is it a good idea to spend $1000 to make our bike better, or should we go to a Honda Goldwing. Our bike is a 2006 Royal Star deluxe. My hubby calls it the slug.....Thank You, John & Betty

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Master
  • 3,567 Answers

I would go for the Goldwing. Try it out on the mountain before you buy any bike.

Posted on Jun 29, 2009

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of.(from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones)
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

WHat brake fluid do I use in a Carreras Vulcan mountain bike


101 Bike Maintenance Tips
Your bicycle doesn't run on leg power alone. It also needs a little lube, a lotta­ love, and a good ­listen. You may not know every remedy your bike needs to live a long life, but you can gain enough wisdom along the way to keep it in tip-top shape and out of the shop. This collection of mostly timeless advice (until advances in bicycle technology make some of it obsolete) will guide you through the role of primary caregiver-so you can leave the tough stuff to the professionals.
http://www.bicycling.com/maintenance/bicycle-maintenance/101-bike-maintenance-tips

May 26, 2015 | Mountain Cycling

1 Answer

The gears will not change at all. It seems like the part that you twist to change gears is seized on both sides. This is causing the bike to ride very slow.


Actually, it's causing you to have no gearing options. If you were Lance Armstrong the bike would move fast ;0) even with a flat tire.

http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/shift-levers-shifters

Crimped, corroded shifter cables can prevent accurate shifting. I'm thinking you need a bike mechanic to look at it.

After it's all fixed you might want to view some resources concerning shifting, braking and general riding skills. It's all out there.

Feb 23, 2011 | Pacific International Pacific Evolution...

1 Answer

What tire pressure should I use in my mountain bike tires?


The appropriate mountain bike tire pressure can vary significantly between rider to rider and tire setup to tire setup. Trail conditions and the type of terrain can also greatly effect what tire pressure you should run.
The real trick is to find out exactly what mountain bike tire pressure works best for you and your setup under normal conditions. You can then learn to adjust this pressure for different trails and terrain as needed.

Here's the best way I have found to get to the right pressure for your setup:

Find a good reliable pressure gauge or a pump with a pressure gauge. Use this same gauge or pump the whole time you are making adjustments. Gauges are notoriously inaccurate so if you switch around it will make things much more difficult.

Start with a higher pressure somewhere around 40-50 psi (3-3.5 bar)for for 2.2-2.3 inch tires. For tubeless systems, start much lower, 30 to 40 psi. The heavier you are or the smaller your tires, the higher pressure you should start with. Ride with this pressure for a while and get a feel for how the tires hook up in corners and on loose dirt.

Now, drop the pressure by 5 psi (0.35 bar) in each tire. Once again get a feel for how this new setup rides and compare it to the previous setting. You should feel some improvement in tire hookup with the ground and a little more stability. If you don't notice any difference drop the pressure by another 5 psi (0.35 bar).

What you want to find is the lowest pressure you can ride without sacrificing pinch flat resistance. You get a pinch flat when your tire rolls over an object and compresses to the point where the tire and tube literally get pinched between the object and the rim of the wheel. This commonly results in a snake bite or double puncture in the tube.

Continue to reduce tire pressure by 3-5 psi (0.1-0.3 bar) until you feel the tires are hooking up well. If you go too far, you will start getting pinch flats, so stop dropping pressure in your tires as soon as you feel you have good control or you no longer notice any improvement between pressure drops.

If you start feeling your rims contact objects or if you start getting pinch flats, raise the pressure back up in small intervals.

In tubeless systems, since you don't have to worry about pinch flats so much, you can run much lower pressures and some occasional rim contact is OK, but if you start denting your rims, burping air out along the bead, or if you feel the tire roll under the rim during hard cornering, you have gone too low.

There is another balance you play with tire pressure. Lower pressure does increase rolling resistance. However, some argue, the increased control and climbing traction makes up for the extra effort needed to compensate for the extra rolling resistance. I lean toward running nearly as low pressure as you can get away with. Cross country racers may decide to sacrifice a little control for a little better efficiency.

Dec 21, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

Can you please provide me a list of all major bike types?


I have listed the most famous bike types: BMX Bicycle

Bicycle Moto Cross (BMX) bicycles are designed for rough off road riding and are typically single speed. People also use them for stunt riding, and you may see some fitted with stunt pegs.

Mountain Bike (MTB)

A mountain bike is designed for trail riding and downhill riding. It can also be ridden on the road. They come in many shapes and forms. Some have no suspension, whilst others have front and rear suspension. A mountain bike without rear suspension is usually called a hard tail bike.

Most MTBs use 26 inch wheels which is the standard. This size wheel is fairly strong, especially when coupled with the large off road tyres that are fitted to MTBs.

An MTB is suited for off road riding and will handle rough terrain quite easy. It is very stable on rough terrain, but is a lot slower to ride on the road when compared to a road bike. It is also suitably geared for climbing hills.

Hybrid Bicycle

Another style of bike that has a similar riding position to a mountain bike, but better road speed is a Hybrid bicycle. Hybrids are a cross between a mountain bike and a road bike. They have an upright comfortable position, road tyres, and are usually a lot lighter than a mountain bike.

Hybrid bicycles are typically used for commuting.

Touring Bicycle

A touring bicycle is designed for loaded cycle touring and has the capability to be fitted with mudguards, racks, panniers and extra water cages. They are typically fitted with wider road type tyres that are suitable for gravel riding also.

They usually come with a stronger frame and longer chainstays so that the back of your feet don't hit the rear panniers. They are usually fitted with a relaxed drop bar style handlebar. The geometry of the frame is also different and allows for much more easier steering and handling when loaded.

Expedition Bicycle

As above for touring, but usually fitted with Trekking bars and MTB gear and is designed for extreme off road conditions.

Randonneur or 'All Rounder'

A rare beast in Australia where we like to specialise. 'Randonneur' is a French term, coined to describe a bike that can do a bit of everything - you can ride with the pack or take a doddle with the kids, you can ride light or carry a load, you'd use it to visit Gran on Sunday then pick up some groceries on the way home. They are the 'family station wagon' of cycling. However, like any Jack of All Trades, they do everything well but the specialists do it better. They can carry a load but not like a heavy tourer. They are fast but heavier than a racer and with more comfortable geometry. They have wider wheels and tyres to ride on rough roads but wont handle true off road work.

Typically, they look like any other racing or flat bar road bike ... until you look at the details. Most randonneurs start life as a touring bike or hybrid, and are then modified by the owner over time to reflect how they are used.

Dec 21, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

What's a "hardtail"? What's "full suspension"?


A "hardtail" is a mountain bike that has a front suspension fork (like the one on the right) and no shock absorber in the back. Good hardtails are light, fast and responsive, and because of this they are good for climbing.
Even the cheapest mountain bikes these days tend to have suspension forks. That's not necessarily a good thing, since most of the forks on cheap bikes are of poor quality and will probably need replacing before too long. The cheapest forks also tend to be sold only on new bikes, and not separately. Find out the make and model of the fork, and search around on the web for it. The price will give you an indication of the fork quality.
Most decent bikes are sold with Rock Shox, Manitou, or Marzocchi. Marzocchi has been making forks longer than anyone and has probably the best reputation, but they tend to be expensive so you won't find them on anything but expensive bikes. Rock Shox and Manitou make lower-end (but reasonably good) forks. Other reputable brands such as Fox and Suntour make forks that may very well provide a good service life, but are not as well known for mountain bike forks. Replacement forks can be found at very low prices during sales and clearance events, so they can be upgraded later (sometimes at a bargain price). A "full suspension" bike has the front suspension fork and a rear suspension (like the bike on the right). These are highly recommended if you ride in a lot of rocks, as the rear suspension allows you to glide over rough terrain. They're also good for big jumps. The rear shock adds some complexity to the bike, and a good bit more weight at any give price point, plus there'll be a bit more maintenance. Plus, you'll pay a few hundred dollars more than a hardtail for a bike of otherwise equal components. Depending on your terrain, it might be worth it; riding a hardtail in big rocks can be brutal.

Dec 16, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

How to raise the handle bars? I have been able to loosen the screws, but that only allows the handle to turn freely from front the wheel, not to raise it.


CAREFUL!!!! Go to a professional bike shop and let them see if you have enough stem (about 21/2" to 3") in the top tube. Less than that and it can snap off and you can get seriously hurt. More than likely, if they can raise it, you would only pay a minumum charge (not like a car, probably $5-$10)
It will be more if they have to install a new stem, because it involves taking it apart and putting it back together. But, it will be worth it if you like the bike other than it is not comfortable now. Remember, it is not made to be a cruiser which let you sit upright and are comfortable, Supension bikes are for mountain biking and rough terrain, going downhill and climbing. And you usually ride a smaller frame than normal because of how you ride the bike, too big and you lose control. So, the bars are almost always flat and you lean forward. I hope I answered your question, I have been in business for almost 40 years and do know what I am talking about.

Oct 02, 2010 | Schwinn Protocol 1.0 Men's Dual-Suspension...

1 Answer

Sluggish in Mountains


my top speed was 53 mph. I live at 130 feet above sea level and the passes we went over were around 5400 and 4000 feet. The other riders figured it was the carb. I agreed but wonder if this is just the way it is going to be for my 2006 Ridley on the passes or is there something that can be done so I get normal performance and speeds all the time no matter the elevation? Once again the Ridley was the center of attention at every stop we made even with my fellow riders who were on BMW's and Harley's. I forgot my chicken feed but I never get tired of talking about my Ridley (your Ridley). Prior to this ride of 400 miles 90 miles was my longest round trip. I feel like a changed person. I'm the guy with MS and when I got home I had this calm yet confident feeling that I didn't have when I left. My Harley riding friend with 30+ years of riding did not need an explanation when I talked to him this afternoon. I was pretty sore this morning but went for a long walk to pick up my youngest at school, sort of similar to the light workouts on Sunday's following college football games some 24 year ago, and I feel just fine this evening. I must again convey my heart felt thanks to the Ridley family for making this bike and providing the opportunity for those of us who now ride, that may never have had it, had it not been for the Ridley Auto-Glide.,As with all engines with carburetors, you pick an altitude and tune the carb. If you will be at higher elevations more than lower you could jet the carburetor for better high altitude performance. Fuel injected engines have a computer that adjusts fuel flow as the altitude changes.,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2007 Ridley Auto Glide Old school

1 Answer

Sluggish in Mountains


my top speed was 53 mph. I live at 130 feet above sea level and the passes we went over were around 5400 and 4000 feet. The other riders figured it was the carb. I agreed but wonder if this is just the way it is going to be for my 2006 Ridley on the passes or is there something that can be done so I get normal performance and speeds all the time no matter the elevation? Once again the Ridley was the center of attention at every stop we made even with my fellow riders who were on BMW's and Harley's. I forgot my chicken feed but I never get tired of talking about my Ridley (your Ridley). Prior to this ride of 400 miles 90 miles was my longest round trip. I feel like a changed person. I'm the guy with MS and when I got home I had this calm yet confident feeling that I didn't have when I left. My Harley riding friend with 30+ years of riding did not need an explanation when I talked to him this afternoon. I was pretty sore this morning but went for a long walk to pick up my youngest at school, sort of similar to the light workouts on Sunday's following college football games some 24 year ago, and I feel just fine this evening. I must again convey my heart felt thanks to the Ridley family for making this bike and providing the opportunity for those of us who now ride, that may never have had it, had it not been for the Ridley Auto-Glide.,As with all engines with carburetors, you pick an altitude and tune the carb. If you will be at higher elevations more than lower you could jet the carburetor for better high altitude performance. Fuel injected engines have a computer that adjusts fuel flow as the altitude changes.,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2008 Ridley Auto Glide Chopper

1 Answer

Battery ques


Put a voltmeter on the battery. Everything off the battery should be 12.6-12.7 volts or so. A little higher or lower is o.k. Start the bike. Rev up to about 3000 RPM. Voltage should climb and then go to about 14.0-14.5 volts or so. Again a little over or under is O.K. If the voltage doesn't climb above 13 volts or goes over 15 Volt you definitely have charging issues.,,,

Nov 10, 2008 | 2008 Highland Highland Outback

Not finding what you are looking for?
2006 Yamaha Royal Star Tour Deluxe Logo

319 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Yamaha Experts

dhnguyen

Level 2 Expert

281 Answers

Steve Sweetleaf
Steve Sweetleaf

Level 3 Expert

1147 Answers

Tony

Level 3 Expert

2600 Answers

Are you a Yamaha Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...