Question about Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide Ultra Classic Motorcycles

1 Answer

Voltage drops idle

Brand new battery installed , after driving 35 miles notice volt meter drop to 8 , shut bike off would not restart ,would voltage regulater be bad

Posted by Anonymous on

1 Answer

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  • Harley Davidson Master
  • 3,506 Answers

This depends a lot on yeqr of bike, Could be regulator but did it do this before battery was replaced is a good thing to know etc.

Posted on Nov 26, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Kimi
  • 277 Answers

SOURCE: bad battery

Don't rely on on whether the bike will start at a gas station to determine if the charging system is working. Get the multimeter out and do a proper test. Should be getting about 14.5 volts @ around 3K RPM. It's too easy of a test to to just skip. If it is charging then start looking for something else. Was the new battery properly charged to begin with? Loose battery connection? I suppose the GPS could be too much but you said that it was dying last november, so I would suspect something else. P.S. you need a properly charged battery to get an accurate reading for the charging test.

Posted on Nov 20, 2008

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Posted on Jun 15, 2009

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SOURCE: 1995 suzuki 800 intruder looses amps back fires and dies

i would be looking at the voltage regulator,if the regulator is faulty the alternator will not be replacing the voltage that the bike needs to keep running

Posted on Jul 04, 2009

  • 16 Answers

SOURCE: 1998 Kawasaki Vulcan 1500 classic will not start,

under the seat there is a reset button that taked a metal prong thingie (dont know whent it's called) you can use a paper clip - just jump the two terminals and try to start it,, doesnt happen all the time but it does happen.

Posted on Jul 23, 2010

wd4ity
  • 4565 Answers

SOURCE: After leaving the last gas

Ok, let's check the charging system. The battery is easy. Take the battery out of the bike and take it to an automotive parts store. Ask them to load test the battery for you. If the battery is over two years old, it could need replacing.

Once you're sure the battery is good and it is FULLY CHARGED, we can test the rest of the system. You'll need a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) to check the system. With the battery back in the bike, connect the DVOM across the battery. Red meter lead to the positive terminal of the battery, black meter lead to the negative. Put the meter's function selector switch in DC VOLTS, 20 VOLTS or greater. Start the bike and bring it to a high idle. The meter should read 14.5 - 15.0 volts.

Now, to test the stator, follow the wires from your regulator down to where it goes into the engine cases. Disconnect the connector and look into the engine side of it. You'll see two metal contacts down in there. Set you meter's function selector to AC VOLTS, 50 VOLTS or greater. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Touch each one of the metal contacts down in the engine side of the connector with a meter probe. It makes not difference since we're measuring AC voltage at this point. The meter should read at least 30 volts.

Now, if the alternator (stator test) does not put out at least thirty volts, the stator is bad and needs to be replaced. If the alternator does check good but not enough voltage at the battery, your regulator may be the culprit. Make sure all connections are clean and tight and that the body of the regulator is grounded good. Recheck the test at the battery. If it still fails, replace the regulator.

Now, I've seen may problems such as your's that are intermittant. In other words, the problem is here on minute and gone the next. I fought that on one bike for over a year until we finally replaced the entire charging system and fixed it. If your bike proves to be doing that, you may wish to consider that option. Fix the thing and be done with it. I wouldn't buy the rotor, just the stator and the regulator.

Good Luck
Steve

Posted on Aug 31, 2010

Testimonial: "right on with the test procedure. Battery didn't show it was charging. While the stator test showed 30vac, an ohm test showed it was grounded. Thanks "

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Sometimes while riding the bike, it stalls after driving for sometime and then experienced hard start until it won't start again. Had battery checked and it was drained. Replaced with a new battery but...


Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your meter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe meter for drop in aprerage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at "BOTH" ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v while cranking replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor.
17. For a free wiring diagram please visit the website below. Good luck and have nice day.
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1 Answer

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Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your meter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe meter for drop in aprerage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v while cranking replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor.
17. For a free wiring diagram please visit the website below and good luck.
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1 Answer

My battery & check engine idiot lighst went on three days ago. i noticed that every time i went to start the bike since then, the battery seemed to be losing charge. so i installed a brand new...


You guessed exactly what I was going to say. Even a new battery is not fully charged when you install it in your bike. Between your riding and then leaving your key on, the battery died. It was going to happen sooner or later whether you left your key on or not. This way at least you were not stuck on the side of the highway. Man, I hate that.


You need to check the charging system. To do this you need to fully charge the battery and you'll need a good Digital Volt Ohm Meter. Using the meter's function selector switch, set it to DC VOLTS with a range of 20 volts or greater. Connect the red meter lead to the positive battery post and the black meter lead to the negative battery post. Start the
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If you don't have the minimum voltage at the battery in the previous test, you need to check the
alternator to see if it's generating sufficient voltage. You'll have to follow the wires from your voltage regulator going to the lower left front of your engine until you come to a plug. Unplug the plug and look into the engine side of it. You'll see two metal contacts in the rubber plug. This is where you are going to test the voltage from your alternator. Since you'll be testing AC voltage, it makes no difference which meter lead goes into which contact, just one lead into each contact. Set your meter's function selector switch to AC VOLTS with a 50 volt or greater range. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Insert one meter lead into each of the metal contacts. Do not let the leads touch each other or the engine case or ground. Your meter should read at least 30 volts.

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You didn't say what year or model bike you're working on but either way, I'd check the charging system. I'd also take the battery back where I bought it and have it checked. I've seen brand new batteries go bad. Have it checked just to make sure it is good. You need to have it "load tested", not just put a voltmeter on it. A voltmeter doesn't tell you the condition of the battery because the meter is designed not to put a load on the device you're checking. The starter puts a tremendous load on the battery and if it's got a shorted cell, the voltage will drop below 11 volts when trying to start the bike.

You need to check the charging system. To do this you need to fully charge the battery and you'll need a good Digital Volt Ohm Meter. Using the meter's function selector switch, set it to DC VOLTS with a range of 20 volts or greater. Connect the red meter lead to the positive battery post and the black meter lead to the negative battery post. Start the
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If you don't have the minimum voltage at the battery in the previous test, you need to check the
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If you do not have the 25 volts from the alternator, your stator is bad and must be replaced. If you have 25 volts or more but not the 14 volt minimum at the battery, your voltage regulator is probably bad. Make sure you voltage regulator is properly grounded. Check the condition of the wire coming from the regulator going to the battery. This wire is usually larger in diameter than the other two going to the alternator.


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Ok, let's check the charging system. The battery is easy. Take the battery out of the bike and take it to an automotive parts store. Ask them to load test the battery for you. If the battery is over two years old, it could need replacing.

Once you're sure the battery is good and it is FULLY CHARGED, we can test the rest of the system. You'll need a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) to check the system. With the battery back in the bike, connect the DVOM across the battery. Red meter lead to the positive terminal of the battery, black meter lead to the negative. Put the meter's function selector switch in DC VOLTS, 20 VOLTS or greater. Start the bike and bring it to a high idle. The meter should read 14.5 - 15.0 volts.

Now, to test the stator, follow the wires from your regulator down to where it goes into the engine cases. Disconnect the connector and look into the engine side of it. You'll see two metal contacts down in there. Set you meter's function selector to AC VOLTS, 50 VOLTS or greater. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Touch each one of the metal contacts down in the engine side of the connector with a meter probe. It makes not difference since we're measuring AC voltage at this point. The meter should read at least 30 volts.

Now, if the alternator (stator test) does not put out at least thirty volts, the stator is bad and needs to be replaced. If the alternator does check good but not enough voltage at the battery, your regulator may be the culprit. Make sure all connections are clean and tight and that the body of the regulator is grounded good. Recheck the test at the battery. If it still fails, replace the regulator.

Now, I've seen may problems such as your's that are intermittant. In other words, the problem is here on minute and gone the next. I fought that on one bike for over a year until we finally replaced the entire charging system and fixed it. If your bike proves to be doing that, you may wish to consider that option. Fix the thing and be done with it. I wouldn't buy the rotor, just the stator and the regulator.

Good Luck
Steve

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1 Answer

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