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Removing carburetors I need to take the carburetor off for cleaning

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If you don't have enough mechanical aptibility to remove the carbs, then you probably shouldn't be cleaning them either. worst thing is to take something to a dealership that you tried fixing first. it will cost you more money in the long run.

Posted on Apr 24, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Cleaning the carburetor

Once it has been determined that the carbs are the problem it's time to get to it. Some racks of carbs are easier to remove than others. If you're working on a newer model bike the rubber boots from the airbox to the carbs and the manifold boots from the carbs to the motor should be relatively soft and pliable. On older bikes however this is rarely the case. First remove the fuel tank, seat, and side covers. Depending on your model of bike other parts may need to be removed too. For many single cylinder bikes the carb can often be removed without removing any body work at all. The bike below is a 1983 Yamaha XJ750 Seca with 4 inline Hitachi carburetors You'll want to loosen the circle clamps on all of the rubber boots. Sometimes I'll even take them all right off (carefully, without bending them too badly) so that they aren't in the way. Inspect the airbox. On many bikes it is bolted in place to tabs on the frame. Remove those bolts and try to create as much space as possible for the airbox to pull backwards. Next, put the bike on it's centerstand and straddle it facing forward. Put your right hand on the right-most carburetor and your left hand on the left-most carburetor and get ready to sweat. Sometimes you'll be able to pull the carbs straight backwards nice and easy, but that is pretty rare. I usually end up rotating them up then rotating them down as best I can while pulling backwards furiously. This can really take some work and time, especially if you've never done it before. In real extreme cases where you simple can't get the carbs to pull backwards out of the manifold boots I have a couple tips. These tips should only be used in extremely difficult cases when you have been struggling for an hour and simple can't get the carbs to pull backwards out of the manifold boots. Tip 1: Ratchet Straps - This is sort of a last resort, but it has worked without fail for me when I'm pooling sweat on the garage floor and the carbs aren't budging. Wrap a ratchet strap around one of the outer carbs and put the hooks somewhere on the rear of the frame. Then slowly ratchet the carbs right out of the boots. Be careful not to pull them too cockeye'd or you could damage the boots. Attach a second ratchet strap to the other side if necessary. (Note: you can do this in the opposite direction to force carbs back into the boots once they are clean.) Tip 2: Full Pull! - You should do this before you do the ratchet strap method above. Sit down on your butt along one side of the bike. Wedge one of your feet up between the forks and the front fender, then put both hands on the same outermost carb and PULL PULL PULL! This might not work so well if you're short! Ha. Ok, So The Carbs are pulled back Chances are the airbox boots are all crammed up now. Do your best to rotate the carbs up and out from the boots and pull them out one side of the bike. Sometimes it's easier to pull the carbs out one side than the other, so have a look to see if there are frame elements, motor elements, or hoses that may block the carbs from coming out on one side. Also keep note of the throttle cable(s) and choke cable (if there is one). Now may be a good time to loosen the nuts that hold them in place and disconnect them. Struggle just a couple more minutes wriggling the carbs out the side. Ok, You have the carbs off the bike Make sure you brush off any loose dirt or grime, then flip the carbs over and remove the screws from the corners of the carburetor. Some carbs won't have bolts in the corner and instead have a wire latch over top which can just be forced over. Remove the bowls. If the carbs are real gummed up the insides might look like this: It's obvious that these carbs are all clogged up. Some carbs might not look so bad, some might be a lot worse. It's always a mystery what will be inside the bowls. Now it's time to remove the floats. It's generally a good idea to drench everything in carb cleaner (available at any autoparts store). Sometimes the pins will practically fall right out, sometimes they'll be so stubborn you won't think they'll ever come free. But they will! Carefully push on the pin from either side. Sometimes a nail and a gentle tap from a hammer is helpful. **BE CAREFUL**, using force to remove a stuck float pin can break off the pin tower. If they are really stuck and you can't seem to work them free here are a couple tips. Tip 1: Heat - Adding a little flame to the float pin towers can help. **Don't Burn Down Your Garage!!** Tip 2: Pliers - Using pliers to gently clamp the end of the pin and push it through has worked well for me in the past. **Don't break the towers!!** Once the float pin is out you can remove the floats, the float needle, and unscrew the float jet screen. Set everything aside. Next remove the main jet, pilot jet, and idle jet (if there is one). They should come out easily with a flathead screw driver. Set them aside. Next flip the carburetors back over and remove the caps. Underneath the caps is a rubber diaphram with a spring. Sometimes the caps have a tendency to shoot off the top, so be very methodical when removing the screws. Other times the cap tends to stick down until you start to pry at it, then it shoots off, again, just be cautious and don't loose any parts. Next you'll want to gently pull the slides up out of the carburetor body. You can gently pull on the rubber diaphrams, but be very careful not to tear them. If they don't come up easily stick your finger into the carb intake and push the slide up with your finger. You can also gently pry it with a screw driver (gently). If it doesn't want to budge don't force it. Instead finish reading this article and pay attention to the boiling tips further down. Now your carbs should be pretty well emptied out. If the throttle on the bike moved fluidly and smooth there is little reason to do much to the carb bodies themselves. However, if the trottle was real sticky or frozen there are a few things you can do to free it up. Sometimes just drenching all the throttle components on the carbs and letting it soak is enough, other times it is not. I generally try to break racks of carbs apart. It isn't often necessary and can be confusing to put everything back together in the right places. Also, the little rubber connector hoses and o-rings have a tendency to crack or leak if you mess with them. If you can't work the throttle back and forth until its smooth have a look at the boiling tips further down. Keep it Neat Organization pays off. Clean the Main, Idle and Pilot Jets Hold each jet up to the light and see if you can look through it. The idle and/or pilot jets have extremely small holes so make sure you are looking through them straight. If you can see through the jet it isn't clogged. There could be a little gunk built up around the edges so spray them down with carb cleaner and let them sit a bit. If you can't see through the jet it is clogged and needs to be cleaned. Always try the easiest things first. Here's an ordered list of a few things you can do to clean the jet. Blow through it. - Rarely works, but hey, who knows. Compressed air. - Force 100 pounds into it. Works occassionally. Make sure to hold the jet tightly so it doesn't go flying across the garage. You might put the jet back into the carb body to hold it in place for this. Soak it in cleaner. - When I first started cleaning carbs I thought carb cleaner would be the magic answer. It isn't. In fact, I hardly ever use carb cleaner any more, because it simply doesn't do a very good job of anything but removing varnish from the bowl and slide. But try this. Poking it through. - Collect a few different diameters of needle like objects. A wire from a steel bristle brush works well, a bristle from a broom works well, a baby pin, small sewing needle, etc. Very gently try to poke it through the jet. If you are using a metal needle use caution, brass jets can scratch and deform easily. Boiling! - This works better than anything. Toss the jets into a pot of boiling water and let them bounce around for a couple minutes. When you pull them out blow some compressed air through them and you'll most likely be good to go. Some idle jets can be real tricky and never seem like they'll be cleaned out . . . Just keep working at it, I've never met a jet that couldn't be cleaned. Cleaning the Choke and Air Mixture Screw Air mixture screws have a tendency to strip or break. If the carbs were real gummed up you might find that the air screws are stuck. Don't force them, if they don't want to come out, just leave them for now. It is fairly rare that these screws will need to be cleaned because they are above the float level. If you can get them out just wipe them down with carb cleaner and spray some through the jet. Cleaning the Slide and Needle These are easy to clean. Squirt them with a bit of carb cleaner, wd-40, or anything similar, then wipe them down with a rag. Once the varnish is gone they're good to go. Sometimes they get heavy varnish on them which I will scratch off carefully with a piece of plastic. Scratching the slide and needle is a BAD thing, use caution. Cleaning the Carb Bodies Use the same squirt and wipe method noted above. Most of the time the other pressed jets and passages in the carburetors won't be clogged. But if the bike has been sitting a real long time with squirrels in the airbox it is certainly possible. Us a compressor to blow some air into every passage you can see. Listen for the air coming out the other side. If no air compressor is available use a can of WD-40 with a straw attachment. If some of the pressed jets are clogged it can be difficult to open them up. There are a few things you can do. Carb Dip - Most autoparts stores sell carb dip. It comes in a can similar to a paint can and is a VERY harsh cleaning agent. Soak the entire carbs in this dip. This dip can eat at rubber and plastics if they are submerged for too long, so try and remove everything you can from the carb bodies before soaking them. Once you pull them out swish the carbs around in a bucket of water to clean off the excess dip, then hose them down with WD-40 to get rid of the water. Boiling in Water - Not many people do this but it is by far the best way of cleaning carburetors. Dropping the carbs into a pot of boiling water will instantly free up stuck slides, throttle plates, and other frozen parts. It will also loosen the dirt and grime clogging up pressed jets and other passages. Just make sure to dry the carbs thoroughly with compressed air or the sun afterwards. Boiling in Lemon Juice - There is NOTHING BETTER at cleaning carbs than a giant pot of boiling lemon juice. The acidity from the lemons eats through everything; gas varnish, oil build up, dirt, grime, etc. Sometimes I won't even bother doing anything but this - I'll just remove the bowls, remove the caps, then drop everything into the pot and let it sit for 20 minutes (rotate them a few times). The one caveat to doing this is that you'll want to wash the lemon juice off the carbs as soon as you pull them out. So have a bucket of water ready, or a can of WD-40 to hose them down. Also note that the acidity has a tendency to put a dull finish on the aluminum bodies of the carbs. This isn't a problem in most cases, but if you must have everything shiny be prepared to do a little scrubbing and polishing afterwards. It may sound weird, but trust me, I just saved you LOTS of time. (Most dollar stores sell 1/2 gallon jugs of lemon juice, so buying a few gallons will only cost you $6. Plus you can put it back into the bottles afterwards and save it for next time.) Cleaning the Bowls This is pretty straight forward. Use any of the methods above to tranform your varnished bowls. Most carb bowls are simple, just clean them up and they are good to go. But I picked this Hitachi's for photos because they have a jet built into the bowl. You can see the 'fifth' hole along the edge of the bowl, that is actually a thin passage that extends to the bottom of the bowl. This is for the idle jet and is extremely important. If these passages are clogged, the bike won't stay running, period. Use the same poke, soak, and boiling methods outlined elsewhere in this article. Not all bowls have these passages, only some, if your's don't - good for you! Once Everything is Clean Now that everything is clean it's time to put it all back together. Take your time and make sure you put everything back where it came from. WD-40 is your friend. When screwing in the jets don't over do it, they only need to be seated and snug, do NOT use any force putting the carbs back together. If the bowl gaskets got goobered up you can put a little RVT on them. So long as the float needles are still in good condition leaky gaskets shouldn't be an issue. However, prudent carb tinkerers may want to order replacements if necessary. Once the carbs are back together stuff them back into the bike! Extra Notes Rebuild Kits - This guide did not mention rebuild kits until now. Rebuild kits (consisting of new gaskets, jets, needles, etc) can be purchased for nearly any bike, both old and new. 95% of the time these are NOT needed. I have rebuilt enough carbs to block off main street, and only once have I used new parts. ONCE! Carburetor Adjustment - Carburetor adjustment, setup, jetting, and synchronizing is a whole encyclopedia waiting to happen. Those topics are not covered in this article, but I will address them in future articles. Carburetor Polishing - External carb asthetics will be important to some, and not to others. Cleaning is all I am covering here, this will be addressed in the future. Work Space - Make sure you have lots of space to keep organized. I also like to work on a wooden surface because it absorbs the spilled gas and cleaners rather than pooling. That's it! You're Done! I'll continue to write a couple more related articles about diagnosing carburetion issues as well as the proper way to adjust, jet, and tune your carbs.

Posted on Nov 20, 2008

  • 200 Answers

SOURCE: schematic diagram of a 1981 yamaha 750 virago carburetor

Should get a good view of it by downloding free manual at
carlsalter.com...good Luck to you friend...Tim

Posted on May 13, 2009

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: setting float level on HSC40 Hitachi carburetors on 1986 Virago

I have a 1982 Virago 750 that I just did a carb rebuild to. To set the float levels I built a jig from wood that simulates the position of the carbs when mounted on the bike. This jig clamps into my bench vise. I created a fuel supply using a small funnel and a piece of fuel hose mounted above the level of the carbs.. After that all you need is a short length of transparent fuel hose to attach to the drain on the bottom of the float bowl to provide the visual indication of the float setting. Now you are ready to set up the float levels on your bench. This is way easier than trying to set them up in the bike.

Make sure that the jig is set up so that the carbs sit as level as possible across the pair and that they sit as close to the natural position in the bike in the lengthwise position when the bike is sitting level.

The process of setting up these floats can be very tedious, be patient. It may require that the float bowls be removed multiple times to get it correct (I replaced the philips head machine screws with allen head screws to make this easier). Printed instructions for the procedure look for a certain fuel level setting plus or minus 1mm. This kind of tolerance can be quite difficult to get when the only adjustment you have to work with is to bend the metal tang on the float assembly.


Posted on Jul 09, 2009

  • 3567 Answers

SOURCE: how do I clean the carburetor?

ALWAYS have a fire extinguisher on hand when working on carburetors.
Remove the water trap bowl at the bottom of the petcock, (gas valve). Is there any water or trash in the bowl? Drain a cup of gas from the tank. Is there any water or trash in the cup? Dump it, clean it and re-mount it, ( not all bikes have a water trap bowl ).

Drain the carburetor. There should be a screw on the lower side or bottom of the carb float bowl. Remove the screw then replace it after the fuel drains. Install a new stock NGK spark plug and clean the air filter. If the bike still doesn't start and run properly then shut off the gas and remove the carburetor from the engine.

Remove the float bowl and clean the entire carb with a spray carb cleaner from the auto parts store. Wear protective goggles to avoid getting spray in your eyes. Spray into all the little airways and fittings in the carb. Remove the idle screw and the air screw on the outside throat of the
carb and spray into the screw holes as well.
< < READ CLOSELY > >
Be sure to put these two screws back in the same hole they came out of. IMPORTANT > do not tighten these two adjusters down. Only screw these in until they LIGHTLY seat. Now turn each adjuster one and one half turns outward. Re-
install the carb. Let the float bowl fill then start the engine.

Please rate this solution. Thanks!

Posted on Aug 19, 2009

  • 3567 Answers

SOURCE: carburetor adjustments yamaha 450yfz 2004

Turn both the air screw and throttle screw inward until they LIGHTLY seat. Now back each one outward one and one half turns. This is the factory setting. I am going to give you a web site where you can download a free PDF factory service manual for a YZ450FR. I believe the model is a bit different but the carbs are the same.

Go to this site and you can download a free PDF service manual. The site may take up to 25 seconds to fully load the list of manuals. It is worth the wait. www.carlsalter.com/motorcycle-manuals.asp The service procedures are there in detail and a lot of diagrams and photos. Don't mess with the pilot screw unless you have to, Part #11 in the diagram.
Can I get a Very Helpful" rating out of this?

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Posted on Sep 06, 2009

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The engine isn't getting enough fuel. Your carburetor needs cleaning. Generators are notorious for gummed carburetors because of the ethanol alcohol in today's gasoline and the generator sitting idle for weeks, months & even years without use wicks moisture into the fuel. Drain your carburetor of gasoline, & remove the carburetor. Clean your carburetor with Carburetor Cleaner spray & make sure the float needle valve & seat are clear of gum & varnish. To help prevent this from happening again, shut off the fuel petcock at the fuel tank and run the generator carburetor out of fuel before you put it away. It'll help keep the carburetor free of gunk. Also, replace the old fuel in the tank with fresh fuel every 3-6 months.

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There is probably water in your carburetor that is keeping the unit from running. When you press the primer bulb you are pushing fuel past the water into the carburetor .. this is why it will start up. Then it will try to pick up the water and then the unit will die. I would loosen the bowl nut on the bottom of the carburetor and dump the fuel from the fuel tank into an approved container. Also you may take the carburetor bowl off and see if you can see some water on the bottom of the bowl. Keep the bowl steady when you remove it. Also, check to see if the carburetor has any corrosion from the water sitting in it. It may have a white "stalagmite" appearance, or a varnish if the fuel was left in it from the last time you ran the unit last fall. If there is any corrosion you may be able to clean it up with some carburetor cleaning spray. This is available at any hardware or automotive store. After you have done this, then put some fresh fuel in the unit and prime it up and see if it will continue to run. If it does not run, then the carburetor needs to be removed and cleaned. To clean the carburetor you will need a thin wire. You can use this wire to probe the holes in the carburetor and "push" any obstruction out of the way and then you can use the carburetor cleaner to make sure the passage is clear. Then blow the holes out with compressed air. This should clean it up. If the unit still does not run then you may have to replace the carburetor with a new one. If you have to get a new carburetor, take in the MODEL, TYPE, and CODE off of the flywheel housing. It is stamped in the metal.

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Will not crank pulling the cord. will crank and run for a few seconds if small amount of fuel added in spark plug hole.


Hello,
My name is Dane and I am going to assist you in solving your problem.

You probably have a clogged Carburetor. To clean the Carburetor, you will probably need to remove, disassemble, soak, and use compressed air to blow out the jets in your carburetor. Pay close attention to how the carburetor is attached to the engine. Make a drawing if you need to or take some pictures. Remove the Carburetor from the engine. Remove the air filter, linkages, throttle/choke cables and fuel lines as needed. Remove the mounting bolts/nuts. You will need to disassemble the carburetor as far as possible and put it in some Carburetor cleaning solution. You can get this at any auto parts store. Do not place rubber parts in the solution. Allow it to soak in cleaner as directed, and then blow out the ports and jets with compressed air immediately after you take it out of the cleaning solution. Be careful not to get any spray back on your skin or in your eyes. Reinstall the Carburetor in the reverse order. Replace any worn or torn gaskets or o-rings as you assemble and reinstall it.

If it starts after you are finished with the cleaning, but still runs a little rough, you will need to adjust the high-speed mixture setting on your Carburetor. Turning the high-speed screw out just 1/2 turn or so should do the trick. It is not so hard to adjust the Carburetor, however you do need a special tool that is very hard to get your hands on. They don't make many engines with plain screw heads on the jet screws anymore. The newer Carburetors are factory set lean so they can pass emission standards. If you have a local dealer, they should adjust the mixture for a couple of bucks. If you can adjust the screw, start the engine, allow it to warm up, and apply full throttle. Start backing off the screw just until the engine gets max RPM. That's it. You're done.
Just a TIP: Always mix your fuel with an approved fuel stabilizer. Fuel begins to go bad after a few months and that's why many people have fuel problems in the spring.
I hope I

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My mcculloch air blower will start but dies right away?


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You can also remove the exhaust or muffler to visually insure that the small screen (if applicable on your actual model) is clear of carbon build-up. Clean/replace and retry.

Before you rebuild your carburetor or remove the exhaust, try the simple things below:

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Model no. 31as6fef729 544332 ser.no.11235B80204


This is a good time to remind everyone that you should not leave fuel in equipment that is not used on a very regular basis. More than likely your carburetor is gummed up from the old fuel. This can happen in less than 30 days much less 2 years.
To properly clean a carburetor you need to remove the carburetor and purchase the correct kit for the rebuild. Disassemble the
carburetor carefully making notes where each part goes. Once you have the carburetor disassembled clean it by soaking it in carburetor cleaner for a few hours. Use anned aerosol automotive carb spray cleaner to fill a small glass jar with enough cleaner to submerge the carburetor. Use a jar with a metal lid so you can gently agitate the solution occasionally to make the process more effective. You need to allow the carburetor to soak as long as it needs to remove all visible deposits. After the carburetor is cleaned allow it to dry and reassemble.

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1 Answer

Old lawn mower will run for 15-20 seconds, then stops. Won't restart for 5-10 minutes, then runs and quits again. Over and over...help!


Hello:

It Sounds like the Carburetor may Require Cleaning or the Carburetor Solenoid Requires Replacing.
The Following is a Basic Instruction File I made for Cleaning the Fuel Systems on Small Engines. The Following Diagnostics Sound like a Lot of Time. The Time is Really in the Soaking Process. Cleaning the Tank is a 15 to 30 Minute Repair. Check the Gas Tank Cap and Make Sure it is Venting the Tank Properly. Is the Gas Tank Clean? Any Water, Dust Particles, Dirt or Rust Particles will Slowly Restrict the Gas Flow to the Carburetor During Operation. When the Engine Stalls/Quits, a Small amount of Gas Back Flows to the Tank and Flushes this Debris Back into the Tank. The Action of Starting the Engine Shakes the Tank and Mixes these Particles Back into the Gas and the Unit will Run for Anywhere from 45 Minutes to 2 Hours and then Stall. Also, if the Carburetors Internal Passages are Slightly Restricted, and a Slightly Extra Load is Added to the Normal Load of the Generator, the Restriction Causes the Engine to Stall Due to Lack of Proper Fuel to Compensate for the Extra Load. 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Using a Breakdown of the Carburetor at the Site I Provided, Most People can Disassemble and Assemble the Carburetor (and other Engine Components) with Little to No Problems. The Cost of the Cleaning Solution I Use is $30.00us @ Gallon (I Use Gunk). The Gallon Can Comes with a Tray for Small Parts and the Carburetor Fits Nicely. Most Times a Carburetor can be Soaked and Cleaned and with the Float, Needle Valve and Other Carburetor Components being Soaked in the Cleaner with the Carburetor Body; there are No Parts to Replace on this Carburetor. If you Soak and Clean this Carburetor and the Float Needle Valve Still Does Not Stop the Gas Flow Properly, then Purchase a Needle and Seat Kit and Replace it. The Following is a Basic File I Made for Cleaning Carburetors. Any Input is Appreciated. Even though the Carburetor Looks Clean, the Internal Passages May be Restricted with Varnish that Gas Causes to Build Up over Time. 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Spray the Seat with Spray Lubricant to make Installation Easier. The End of a Drill Bit that is Slightly Small than the Seat can be Use as an Insertion Tool. Wear Gloves or Use a Rag when Handling the Sharpened End of the Drill Bit. Remove Any Adjustment Screws that Go Into the Carburetor Body. The Welch Plugs Do Not have to be Removed. If you are Able to Remove and Disassemble the Carburetor and Keep the Gaskets Intact, then Usually these Gaskets can be Reused. Even the O-Ring Around the Bowl can be Reused if it is Not Broken. The Only Parts you May Need to Replace is the Float Needle Valve (and Seat if Applicable). The Float Needle Usually is Not Replaced Unless it is Not Operating Properly (the gas flow not shutting off and the carburetor is Flooding). Do Not Remove the Main Nozzle. This is a Pressed Fit and Removal is Not Required for Cleaning. Soaking and Blowing the Carburetor Out After Soaking will Clean the Nozzle. Once Disassembled, then Soak the Carburetor Body and Parts in a 1 Gallon Can of Gunk Carburetor Cleaner Overnight. The Can has a Parts Tray Inside it for the Small Parts. Once the Carburetor and Parts are in the Cleaner, you can Replace the Lid for Safety and to Prevent Accidental Spillage. Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air.*** (Do Not Use High Pressure Air for the Zama Carburetors, they have Check Valves for the Primer and these are Usually Blown Out of the Carburetor if Not Careful. Allow the Zama Carburetor to Set on a Drip Pan and Dry)***. ****All the Carburetor Adjustments are the Same for Lawn Mower and Trimmers. There are Several Location for the Air Mixture Screws. The Idle Air Mixture Screws are Usually Located at the Top of the Carburetor Bowl and the Top of the Carburetor Body. If the Main Air and Idle Air Mixture Screws are Side by Side on the Side of the Carburetor, then the Idle Air is Nearest the Engine. The Main Jet Air Mixture Screw is Located in the Bottom of the Carburetor Bowl or Beside the Idle Air Screw on the Side of the Carburetor Body. Some of the Older Model Carburetors have the Main Jet Mixture Screw Straight in from the Top of the Carburetor Body (this is Rare anymore). If you have Cleaned the Carburetor (Disassembled and Soaked Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk). Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air and Install a New Kit if Required. Now Setting the Air Mixture Screws: ****Turn the Idle Air and Main Air Mixture Screws In Until SNUG **Do Not Jam** Then Reverse Both Screws 1 1/2 Turns. Holding the Throttle Full Open, Start the Engine. Turn the Main Air Mixture Screw Clockwise Until Proper Revs are Obtained. Occasionally you May have to Turn this Counter Clockwise to Achieve the Proper Revs. Now Allow the Engine to Idle. Set the Engine Idle Screw (Not Idle Air) so the Engine will Stay Running if Required. Now Set the Idle Air Mixture Screw so there is No Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle. Reset the Engine Idle if Required.**** If This Carburetor has a Single Air Adjustment (Except Tank Mounted 9200 Model Carburetors), Use the Section Above that Pertains to Full Throttle RPM Air Mixture Screw and then Adjust the Screw if Required to Eliminate Any Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle. For the 9200 Model Tank Mounted Carburetor Adjust the Air Mixture Screw Full In, then Reverse 1 1/2 Turns. Set the Throttle Lever to Full Throttle and Start the Engine. Now Carefully Use 1 Finger and Open the Throttle Plate and Over Rev the Engine Slightly. If the Engine Over Revs and Does Not Struggle to Over Rev, then the Carburetor is Set. If the Engine Struggles to Over Rev, then Turn the Adjustment Screw In 1/4 Turn and Repeat the Over Rev Test. If you Adjust to 1/2 Turns In and the Engine Still Struggles to Over Rev, then Return the Adjustment Screw to 1 1/2 Turns Out from Snug and Turn the Screw Out 1/4 Turn. Do the Over Rev Test. Continue this Process Until you have the Engine Over Revving without Struggle. By Adjusting the Carburetor on this Style Carburetor Until the Engine Over Revs without Struggle, you have Adjusted the Air Mixture to the Best Possible Setting. This file was Intended to Give you the Basic Carburetor Cleaning Instructions and May Not Reflect Your Carburetor Components. If you have Questions, Please Ask. The links above Provide Good Directions on Cleaning the Carburetor. Make sure you use an Compressed Air to Blow through all the Carburetor Passages to make sure they are Clear. http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmclctc.htm 2- http://www.cpdonline.com/692509.pdf .
>>Please, Do Not Hesitate, If I Missed Something or you Hit a Snag or this Does Not Correct the Problem, I am Here if You Require More Assistance.
Hope this Helps. Let me Know What Happens, Please. May the All Mighty Bless You and Yours. Be Safe and Be Happy. Thanks.


Good Luck


Respectfully


jbridger (John)


Sep 13, 2009 | Garden

1 Answer

I have a John Deere Riding lawn mower which starts


Hello roobar2009:

>>From your Description it Sounds like a Carburetor Problem, a Bad Fuel Filter or Bad Gas.
>>If you have Changed the Filter and the Gas and the Problem is Still happening, then
>>The Following is a Simple Way to make Sure the Engine is Getting Gas from the Carburetor to Run.
>>If the Engine Starts and Quits, then Check the Carburetor Solenoid.
>>If the Carburetor Solenoid is Good or has been Removed and the Engine will Start and Quit when the Gas is Poured into the Carburetor Throat, then Soak and Clean the Carburetor.
>>The Following is a Basic File I Made for Cleaning Carburetors. Any Input is Appreciated. Even though the Carburetor Looks Clean, the Internal Passages May be Restricted with Varnish that Gas Causes to Build Up over Time.
>>Spray Cleaners Remove this Varnish in Layers, so Soaking is the Only Sure Way to Remove ALL this Varnish.
>>I have Found that Most People can Use a Breakdown/IPL and Disassemble the Carburetor Enough for Proper Cleaning.
>>You Only have to Remove the Bowl (if Applicable), Float Pin (if Applicable), Float (if Applicable), Needle Valve.
Remove Any Adjustment Screws that Go Into the Carburetor Body. The Welch Plugs Do Not have to be Removed.
>>If you are Able to Remove and Disassemble the Carburetor and Keep the Gaskets Intact, then Usually these Gaskets can be Reused. The Only Parts you May Need to Replace is the Needle Valve.
>>The Float Needle Usually is Not Replaced Unless it is Not Operating Properly (the gas flow not shutting off and the carburetor is Flooding). Do Not Remove the Main Nozzle. This is a Pressed Fit and Removal is Not Required for Cleaning. Soaking and Blowing the Carburetor Out After Soaking will Clean the Nozzle.
>>Once Disassembled, then Soak the Carburetor Body and Parts in a 1 Gallon Can of Gunk Carburetor Cleaner Overnight. The Can has a Parts Tray Inside it for the Small Parts.
>>Once the Carburetor and Parts are in the Cleaner, you can Replace the Lid for Safety and to Prevent Accidental Spillage. Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air.
>>***(Do Not Use High Pressure Air for the Zama Carburetors, they have Check Valves for the Primer and these are Usually Blown Out of the Carburetor if Not Careful. Allow the Zama Carburetor to Set on a Drip Pan and Dry)***.
>>****All the Carburetor Adjustments are the Same for Lawn Mower and Trimmers. There are Several Location for the Air Mixture Screws. The Idle Air Mixture Screws are Usually Located at the Top of the Carburetor Bowl and the Top of the Carburetor Body.****
>>If the Main Air and Idle Air Mixture Screws are Side by Side on the Side of the Carburetor, then the Idle Air is Nearest the Engine. The Main Jet Air Mixture Screw is Located in the Bottom of the Carburetor Bowl or Beside the Idle Air Screw on the Side of the Carburetor Body.
>>Some of the Older Model Carburetors have the Main Jet Mixture Screw Straight in from the Top of the Carburetor Body (this is Rare anymore). If you have Cleaned the Carburetor (Disassembled and Soaked Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk). Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air and Install a New Kit if Required. Now Setting the Air Mixture Screws:
>>****Turn the Idle Air and Main Air Mixture Screws In Until SNUG **Do Not Jam** Then Reverse Both Screws 1 1/2 Turns. Holding the Throttle Full Open, Start the Engine. Turn the Main Air Mixture Screw Clockwise Until Proper Revs are Obtained. Occasionally you May have to Turn this Counter Clockwise to Achieve the Proper Revs. Now Allow the Engine to Idle. Set the Engine Idle Screw (Not Idle Air) so the Engine will Stay Running if Required. Now Set the Idle Air Mixture Screw so there is No Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle. Reset the Engine Idle if Required.****
>>If This Carburetor has a Single Air Adjustment (Except Tank Mounted 9200 and 100900 Engine Model Carburetors), Use the Section Above that Pertains to Full Throttle RPM Air Mixture Screw and then Adjust the Screw if Required to Eliminate Any Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle.
>>For the 9200 Model Tank Mounted Carburetor Adjust the Air Mixture Screw Full In, then Reverse 1 1/2 Turns. Set the Throttle Lever to Full Throttle and Start the Engine.
>>Now Carefully Use 1 Finger and Open the Throttle Plate and Over Rev the Engine Slightly. If the Engine Over Revs and Does Not Struggle to Over Rev, then the Carburetor is Set. If the Engine Struggles to Over Rev, then Turn the Adjustment Screw In 1/4 Turn and Repeat the Over Rev Test.
>>If you Adjust to 1/2 Turns In and the Engine Still Struggles to Over Rev, then Return the Adjustment Screw to 1 1/2 Turns Out from Snug and Turn the Screw Out 1/4 Turn. Do the Over Rev Test. Continue this Process Until you have the Engine Over Revving without Struggle.
>>By Adjusting the Carburetor on this Style Carburetor Until the Engine Over Revs without Struggle, you have Adjusted the Air Mixture to the Best Possible Setting.
>>This file was Intended to Give you the Basic Carburetor Cleaning Instructions and May Not Reflect Your Carburetor Components.
>>If you have Questions, Please Ask. The links above Provide Good Directions on Cleaning the Carburetor. Make sure you use an Compressed Air to Blow through all the Carburetor Passages to make sure they are Clear.
>>1- http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmclctc.htm
>>2- http://www.cpdonline.com/692509.pdf .
Please, Do Not Hesitate, If I Missed Something or you Hit a Snag or this Does Not Correct the Problem, I am Here if You Require More Assistance.
Hope this Helps. Let me Know What Happens, Please. May the All Mighty Bless You and Yours. Be Safe and Be Happy. Thanks.

Good Luck

Respectfully

jbridger (John)

May 17, 2009 | Garden

1 Answer

Mower wont stay running


Hello nater357:

>>From your Description it Sounds like a Bad Carburetor Solenoid, Restricted Carburetor Passages or a Stuck Carburetor Float Needle Valve.
>>The Following is a Basic Instruction File I made for Checking the Carburetor Solenoid. Any Input is Appreciated.
>>**Check for Current/Voltage (10.5 VDC Minimum) to the Carburetor Shut Off Solenoid. If the Carburetor Shut Off Solenoid has Current, then On Some Solenoids you can Remove the Needle and Replace the Solenoid to Test them.
>>****PLEASE DO NOT OPERATE THE MOWER WITH THE SOLENOID BYPASSED IN THIS MANNER. THIS IS "ONLY" FOR TESTING.****
>>For Others, Remove the Carburetor Solenoid and Go to the Hardware Store. Purchase a Bolt of the Same Diameter and Threads. It Needs to be 1/2" to 3/4" Long for the Horizontal Mount Solenoids and 1/4" to 1/2" Long for the Vertical Mount Solenoids. Put this Bolt in Place of the Solenoid. If this Corrects the Engine Problem, then Replace the Solenoid.
>>***NOTE: THIS IS FOR CHECKING THE SOLENOID ONLY I NEVER SUGGEST YOU OPERATE THE ENGINE WITH THE SOLENOID OUT OF THE CARBURETOR EXCEPT FOR TESTING PURPOSES***
>>Sometimes the Plunger is Moving, Just Not Far Enough to Allow the Gas to Enter the Jet Properly.** **Use 440 Wet Dry Sand Paper and Engine Oil to Clean the Pin. Wet the Sand Paper with Oil Until it is Flexible and then Lightly Polish the Pin. There is Some Slop/Free Play in the Solenoid Pin. Usually the Electromagnet is Simply Not Pulling the Pin as it Should or there is a Small Bur on the Pin. Use 440 Wet Dry Sand Paper and Engine Oil to Clean the Pin. Wet the Sand Paper with Oil Until it is Flexible and then Lightly Polish the Pin. Clean and Lightly Oil the Pin before Inserting it Back into the Solenoid. Just a Film of Oil is All it Takes.**
>>If the Carburetor Solenoid is Good, then
>>The Following is a Basic File I Made for Cleaning Carburetors. Any Input is Appreciated. Even though the Carburetor Looks Clean, the Internal Passages May be Restricted with Varnish that Gas Causes to Build Up over Time.
>>Spray Cleaners Remove this Varnish in Layers, so Soaking is the Only Sure Way to Remove ALL this Varnish.
>>I have Found that Most People can Use a Breakdown/IPL and Disassemble the Carburetor Enough for Proper Cleaning.
>>You Only have to Remove the Bowl (if Applicable), Float Pin (if Applicable), Float (if Applicable), Needle Valve.
Remove Any Adjustment Screws that Go Into the Carburetor Body. The Welch Plugs Do Not have to be Removed.
>>If you are Able to Remove and Disassemble the Carburetor and Keep the Gaskets Intact, then Usually these Gaskets can be Reused. The Only Parts you May Need to Replace is the Needle Valve.
>>The Float Needle Usually is Not Replaced Unless it is Not Operating Properly (the gas flow not shutting off and the carburetor is Flooding). Do Not Remove the Main Nozzle. This is a Pressed Fit and Removal is Not Required for Cleaning. Soaking and Blowing the Carburetor Out After Soaking will Clean the Nozzle.
>>Once Disassembled, then Soak the Carburetor Body and Parts in a 1 Gallon Can of Gunk Carburetor Cleaner Overnight. The Can has a Parts Tray Inside it for the Small Parts.
>>Once the Carburetor and Parts are in the Cleaner, you can Replace the Lid for Safety and to Prevent Accidental Spillage. Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air.
>>***(Do Not Use High Pressure Air for the Zama Carburetors, they have Check Valves for the Primer and these are Usually Blown Out of the Carburetor if Not Careful. Allow the Zama Carburetor to Set on a Drip Pan and Dry)***.
>>****All the Carburetor Adjustments are the Same for Lawn Mower and Trimmers. There are Several Location for the Air Mixture Screws. The Idle Air Mixture Screws are Usually Located at the Top of the Carburetor Bowl and the Top of the Carburetor Body.****
>>If the Main Air and Idle Air Mixture Screws are Side by Side on the Side of the Carburetor, then the Idle Air is Nearest the Engine. The Main Jet Air Mixture Screw is Located in the Bottom of the Carburetor Bowl or Beside the Idle Air Screw on the Side of the Carburetor Body.
>>Some of the Older Model Carburetors have the Main Jet Mixture Screw Straight in from the Top of the Carburetor Body (this is Rare anymore). If you have Cleaned the Carburetor (Disassembled and Soaked Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk). Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air and Install a New Kit if Required. Now Setting the Air Mixture Screws:
>>****Turn the Idle Air and Main Air Mixture Screws In Until SNUG **Do Not Jam** Then Reverse Both Screws 1 1/2 Turns. Holding the Throttle Full Open, Start the Engine. Turn the Main Air Mixture Screw Clockwise Until Proper Revs are Obtained. Occasionally you May have to Turn this Counter Clockwise to Achieve the Proper Revs. Now Allow the Engine to Idle. Set the Engine Idle Screw (Not Idle Air) so the Engine will Stay Running if Required. Now Set the Idle Air Mixture Screw so there is No Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle. Reset the Engine Idle if Required.****
>>If This Carburetor has a Single Air Adjustment (Except Tank Mounted 9200 and 100900 Engine Model Carburetors), Use the Section Above that Pertains to Full Throttle RPM Air Mixture Screw and then Adjust the Screw if Required to Eliminate Any Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle.
>>For the 9200 Model Tank Mounted Carburetor Adjust the Air Mixture Screw Full In, then Reverse 1 1/2 Turns. Set the Throttle Lever to Full Throttle and Start the Engine.
>>Now Carefully Use 1 Finger and Open the Throttle Plate and Over Rev the Engine Slightly. If the Engine Over Revs and Does Not Struggle to Over Rev, then the Carburetor is Set. If the Engine Struggles to Over Rev, then Turn the Adjustment Screw In 1/4 Turn and Repeat the Over Rev Test.
>>If you Adjust to 1/2 Turns In and the Engine Still Struggles to Over Rev, then Return the Adjustment Screw to 1 1/2 Turns Out from Snug and Turn the Screw Out 1/4 Turn. Do the Over Rev Test. Continue this Process Until you have the Engine Over Revving without Struggle.
>>By Adjusting the Carburetor on this Style Carburetor Until the Engine Over Revs without Struggle, you have Adjusted the Air Mixture to the Best Possible Setting.
>>This file was Intended to Give you the Basic Carburetor Cleaning Instructions and May Not Reflect Your Carburetor Components.
>>If you have Questions, Please Ask. The links above Provide Good Directions on Cleaning the Carburetor. Make sure you use an Compressed Air to Blow through all the Carburetor Passages to make sure they are Clear.
>>1- http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmclctc.htm
>>2- http://www.cpdonline.com/692509.pdf .
Please, Do Not Hesitate, If I Missed Something or you Hit a Snag or this Does Not Correct the Problem, I am Here if You Require More Assistance.
Hope this Helps. Let me Know What Happens, Please. May the All Mighty Bless You and Yours. Be Safe and Be Happy. Thanks.

Good Luck

Respectfully

jbridger (John)

May 15, 2009 | Craftsman 42 in. Deck 19.5hp Lawn Tractor

1 Answer

No start


Hello djb4297:

Not knowing the Make or Model of the Engine; I am Sending a Basic File for Checking the Carburetor.
>>The Following is a Basic Instruction File I made for Checking the Carburetor Solenoid. Any Input is Appreciated.
>>**Check for Current/Voltage (10.5 VDC Minimum) to the Carburetor Shut Off Solenoid. If the Carburetor Shut Off Solenoid has Current, then On Some Solenoids you can Remove the Needle and Replace the Solenoid to Test them.
>>****PLEASE DO NOT OPERATE THE MOWER WITH THE SOLENOID BYPASSED IN THIS MANNER. THIS IS "ONLY" FOR TESTING.****
>>For Others, Remove the Carburetor Solenoid and Go to the Hardware Store. Purchase a Bolt of the Same Diameter and Threads. It Needs to be 1/2" to 3/4" Long for the Horizontal Mount Solenoids and 1/4" to 1/2" Long for the Vertical Mount Solenoids. Put this Bolt in Place of the Solenoid. If this Corrects the Engine Problem, then Replace the Solenoid.
>>***NOTE: THIS IS FOR CHECKING THE SOLENOID ONLY I NEVER SUGGEST YOU OPERATE THE ENGINE WITH THE SOLENOID OUT OF THE CARBURETOR EXCEPT FOR TESTING PURPOSES***
>>Sometimes the Plunger is Moving, Just Not Far Enough to Allow the Gas to Enter the Jet Properly.** **Use 440 Wet Dry Sand Paper and Engine Oil to Clean the Pin. Wet the Sand Paper with Oil Until it is Flexible and then Lightly Polish the Pin. There is Some Slop/Free Play in the Solenoid Pin. Usually the Electromagnet is Simply Not Pulling the Pin as it Should or there is a Small Bur on the Pin. Use 440 Wet Dry Sand Paper and Engine Oil to Clean the Pin. Wet the Sand Paper with Oil Until it is Flexible and then Lightly Polish the Pin. Clean and Lightly Oil the Pin before Inserting it Back into the Solenoid. Just a Film of Oil is All it Takes.**
If No Carburetor Solenoid, then the Carbureotor Float Needle Valve is Sticking and I Suggest you Soak and Clean the Carburetor.
>>The Following is a Basic File I Made for Cleaning Carburetors. Any Input is Appreciated. Even though the Carburetor Looks Clean, the Internal Passages May be Restricted with Varnish that Gas Causes to Build Up over Time.
>>Spray Cleaners Remove this Varnish in Layers, so Soaking is the Only Sure Way to Remove ALL this Varnish.
>>I have Found that Most People can Use a Breakdown/IPL and Disassemble the Carburetor Enough for Proper Cleaning.
>>You Only have to Remove the Bowl (if Applicable), Float Pin (if Applicable), Float (if Applicable), Needle Valve.
Remove Any Adjustment Screws that Go Into the Carburetor Body. The Welch Plugs Do Not have to be Removed.
>>If you are Able to Remove and Disassemble the Carburetor and Keep the Gaskets Intact, then Usually these Gaskets can be Reused. The Only Parts you May Need to Replace is the Needle Valve.
>>The Float Needle Usually is Not Replaced Unless it is Not Operating Properly (the gas flow not shutting off and the carburetor is Flooding). Do Not Remove the Main Nozzle. This is a Pressed Fit and Removal is Not Required for Cleaning. Soaking and Blowing the Carburetor Out After Soaking will Clean the Nozzle.
>>Once Disassembled, then Soak the Carburetor Body and Parts in a 1 Gallon Can of Gunk Carburetor Cleaner Overnight. The Can has a Parts Tray Inside it for the Small Parts.
>>Once the Carburetor and Parts are in the Cleaner, you can Replace the Lid for Safety and to Prevent Accidental Spillage. Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air.
>>***(Do Not Use High Pressure Air for the Zama Carburetors, they have Check Valves for the Primer and these are Usually Blown Out of the Carburetor if Not Careful. Allow the Zama Carburetor to Set on a Drip Pan and Dry)***.
>>****All the Carburetor Adjustments are the Same for Lawn Mower and Trimmers. There are Several Location for the Air Mixture Screws. The Idle Air Mixture Screws are Usually Located at the Top of the Carburetor Bowl and the Top of the Carburetor Body.****
>>If the Main Air and Idle Air Mixture Screws are Side by Side on the Side of the Carburetor, then the Idle Air is Nearest the Engine. The Main Jet Air Mixture Screw is Located in the Bottom of the Carburetor Bowl or Beside the Idle Air Screw on the Side of the Carburetor Body.
>>Some of the Older Model Carburetors have the Main Jet Mixture Screw Straight in from the Top of the Carburetor Body (this is Rare anymore). If you have Cleaned the Carburetor (Disassembled and Soaked Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk). Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air and Install a New Kit if Required. Now Setting the Air Mixture Screws:
>>****Turn the Idle Air and Main Air Mixture Screws In Until SNUG **Do Not Jam** Then Reverse Both Screws 1 1/2 Turns. Holding the Throttle Full Open, Start the Engine. Turn the Main Air Mixture Screw Clockwise Until Proper Revs are Obtained. Occasionally you May have to Turn this Counter Clockwise to Achieve the Proper Revs. Now Allow the Engine to Idle. Set the Engine Idle Screw (Not Idle Air) so the Engine will Stay Running if Required. Now Set the Idle Air Mixture Screw so there is No Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle. Reset the Engine Idle if Required.****
>>If This Carburetor has a Single Air Adjustment (Except Tank Mounted 9200 and 100900 Engine Model Carburetors), Use the Section Above that Pertains to Full Throttle RPM Air Mixture Screw and then Adjust the Screw if Required to Eliminate Any Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle.
>>For the 9200 Model Tank Mounted Carburetor Adjust the Air Mixture Screw Full In, then Reverse 1 1/2 Turns. Set the Throttle Lever to Full Throttle and Start the Engine.
>>Now Carefully Use 1 Finger and Open the Throttle Plate and Over Rev the Engine Slightly. If the Engine Over Revs and Does Not Struggle to Over Rev, then the Carburetor is Set. If the Engine Struggles to Over Rev, then Turn the Adjustment Screw In 1/4 Turn and Repeat the Over Rev Test.
>>If you Adjust to 1/2 Turns In and the Engine Still Struggles to Over Rev, then Return the Adjustment Screw to 1 1/2 Turns Out from Snug and Turn the Screw Out 1/4 Turn. Do the Over Rev Test. Continue this Process Until you have the Engine Over Revving without Struggle.
>>By Adjusting the Carburetor on this Style Carburetor Until the Engine Over Revs without Struggle, you have Adjusted the Air Mixture to the Best Possible Setting.
>>This file was Intended to Give you the Basic Carburetor Cleaning Instructions and May Not Reflect Your Carburetor Components.
>>If you have Questions, Please Ask. The links above Provide Good Directions on Cleaning the Carburetor. Make sure you use an Compressed Air to Blow through all the Carburetor Passages to make sure they are Clear.
>>1- http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmclctc.htm
>>2- http://www.cpdonline.com/692509.pdf .
Please, Do Not Hesitate, If you Hit a Snag or this Does Not Correct the Problem, I am Here if You Require More Assistance.
Hope this Helps. Let me Know What Happens, Please. May the All Mighty Bless You and Yours. Be Safe and Be Happy. Thanks.

Good Luck

Respectfully

jbridger (John)

May 13, 2009 | Mtd Garden

1 Answer

Tiller motor set up for six years and now the motor will not start.I cleaned the gas tank,carb. ect.When I try to start it gas comes out of the muffler.What can I do to start the motor.


Hello

If you Used Spray Cleaner to Clean the Carburetor, then you Need to Remove the Carburetor and Soak it in Cleaner Overnight. The Float Needle Valve is Sticking and Flooding the Engine.
>>The Following is a Basic File I Made for Cleaning Carburetors. Any Input is Appreciated. Even though the Carburetor Looks Clean, the Internal Passages May be Restricted with Varnish that Gas Causes to Build Up over Time.
>>Spray Cleaners Remove this Varnish in Layers, so Soaking is the Only Sure Way to Remove ALL this Varnish.
>>I Suggest you Make Sure the Gas is Free Flowing to the Carburetor Inlet Port (if the Model does Not have a Fuel Pump). If the Gas is Free Flowing to the Inlet Port, then
>>**Remove, Disassemble and Soak the Carburetor Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk).
>>The Primer Bulb is Held in Place with a Locking Collar at the Base of the Primer Bulb. Use a Small Flat Screw Driver and Carefully Pry the Lock Ring Up in Small Amounts All Around the Lock Ring until the Lock Ring and Primer Bulb can be Removed from the Carburetor Body. Usually a New Primer Bulb is Required when you have to Soak the Carburetor. The Rubber is Usually Rotted to Much for the Primer to be Reused.
>>Your Primer Bulb May Differ Slightly, but Removal is Usually Almost the Same Except for the Primer Bulbs that are Bolted to the Carburetor. These are Simply Unbolted and Changed with the new Primer Bulb.
>>I have Found that Most People can Use a Breakdown/IPL and Disassemble the Carburetor Enough for Proper Cleaning.
>>You Only have to Remove the Bowl (if Applicable), Float Pin (if Applicable), Float (if Applicable), Needle Valve and Needle Valve Seat if Applicable. This is a Flat O-Ring Located in the Inlet Port the Float Needle Rests in. Use a Strong Wire with a Slight Bend to Remove the Old Seat. Sometimes a Small Pocket Screw Driver can be Use Also.
>>The New Seat will have a Slightly Beveled Side and a Flat Side. The Flat Side goes Towards the Carburetor Body when Inserted into the Inlet Port. Spray the Seat with Spray Lubricant to make Installation Easier. The End of a Drill Bit that is Slightly Small than the Seat can be Use as an Insertion Tool.
>>Wear Gloves or Use a Rag when Handling the Sharpened End of the Drill Bit. Remove Any Adjustment Screws that Go Into the Carburetor Body. The Welch Plugs Do Not have to be Removed.
>>If you are Able to Remove and Disassemble the Carburetor and Keep the Gaskets Intact, then Usually these Gaskets can be Reused. Even the O-Ring Around the Bowl can be Reused if it is Not Broken. The Only Parts you May Need to Replace is the Float Needle Valve (and Seat if Applicable).
>>The Float Needle Usually is Not Replaced Unless it is Not Operating Properly (the gas flow not shutting off and the carburetor is Flooding). Do Not Remove the Main Nozzle. This is a Pressed Fit and Removal is Not Required for Cleaning. Soaking and Blowing the Carburetor Out After Soaking will Clean the Nozzle.
>>Once Disassembled, then Soak the Carburetor Body and Parts in a 1 Gallon Can of Gunk Carburetor Cleaner Overnight. The Can has a Parts Tray Inside it for the Small Parts.
>>Once the Carburetor and Parts are in the Cleaner, you can Replace the Lid for Safety and to Prevent Accidental Spillage. Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air.
>>***(Do Not Use High Pressure Air for the Zama Carburetors, they have Check Valves for the Primer and these are Usually Blown Out of the Carburetor if Not Careful. Allow the Zama Carburetor to Set on a Drip Pan and Dry)***.
>>****All the Carburetor Adjustments are the Same for Lawn Mower and Trimmers. There are Several Location for the Air Mixture Screws. The Idle Air Mixture Screws are Usually Located at the Top of the Carburetor Bowl and the Top of the Carburetor Body.****
>>If the Main Air and Idle Air Mixture Screws are Side by Side on the Side of the Carburetor, then the Idle Air is Nearest the Engine. The Main Jet Air Mixture Screw is Located in the Bottom of the Carburetor Bowl or Beside the Idle Air Screw on the Side of the Carburetor Body.
>>Some of the Older Model Carburetors have the Main Jet Mixture Screw Straight in from the Top of the Carburetor Body (this is Rare anymore). If you have Cleaned the Carburetor (Disassembled and Soaked Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk). Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air and Install a New Kit if Required. Now Setting the Air Mixture Screws:
>>****Turn the Idle Air and Main Air Mixture Screws In Until SNUG **Do Not Jam** Then Reverse Both Screws 1 1/2 Turns. Holding the Throttle Full Open, Start the Engine. Turn the Main Air Mixture Screw Clockwise Until Proper Revs are Obtained. Occasionally you May have to Turn this Counter Clockwise to Achieve the Proper Revs. Now Allow the Engine to Idle. Set the Engine Idle Screw (Not Idle Air) so the Engine will Stay Running if Required. Now Set the Idle Air Mixture Screw so there is No Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle. Reset the Engine Idle if Required.****
>>If This Carburetor has a Single Air Adjustment (Except Tank Mounted 9200 and 100900 Engine Model Carburetors), Use the Section Above that Pertains to Full Throttle RPM Air Mixture Screw and then Adjust the Screw if Required to Eliminate Any Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle.
>>For the 9200 Model Tank Mounted Carburetor Adjust the Air Mixture Screw Full In, then Reverse 1 1/2 Turns. Set the Throttle Lever to Full Throttle and Start the Engine.
>>Now Carefully Use 1 Finger and Open the Throttle Plate and Over Rev the Engine Slightly. If the Engine Over Revs and Does Not Struggle to Over Rev, then the Carburetor is Set. If the Engine Struggles to Over Rev, then Turn the Adjustment Screw In 1/4 Turn and Repeat the Over Rev Test.
>>If you Adjust to 1/2 Turns In and the Engine Still Struggles to Over Rev, then Return the Adjustment Screw to 1 1/2 Turns Out from Snug and Turn the Screw Out 1/4 Turn. Do the Over Rev Test. Continue this Process Until you have the Engine Over Revving without Struggle.
>>By Adjusting the Carburetor on this Style Carburetor Until the Engine Over Revs without Struggle, you have Adjusted the Air Mixture to the Best Possible Setting.
>>This file was Intended to Give you the Basic Carburetor Cleaning Instructions and May Not Reflect Your Carburetor Components.
>>If you have Questions, Please Ask. The links above Provide Good Directions on Cleaning the Carburetor. Make sure you use an Compressed Air to Blow through all the Carburetor Passages to make sure they are Clear.
>>1- http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmclctc.htm
>>2- http://www.cpdonline.com/692509.pdf .
Please, Do Not Hesitate, If you Hit a Snag or this Does Not Correct the Problem, I am Here if You Require More Assistance.
Hope this Helps. Let me Know What Happens, Please. May the All Mighty Bless You and Yours. Be Safe and Be Happy. Thanks.

Good Luck

Respectfully

jbridger (John)

May 11, 2009 | Garden

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