Question about 2005 Yamaha WR 250 F

1 Answer

High speed rear shock adjuster ,where do i set it

Suspension too stiff I ride in desert mostly where should clickers be set, and the high speed adjuster

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  • Expert
  • 254 Answers

Soften the spring , then go 2 clicks on the compression lower

Posted on Mar 19, 2014

6 Suggested Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 233 Answers

SOURCE: Who makes performance shocks for my VSTAR 1300

I have purchased a lowering kit for my 1100 Custom from Pacific Coast Star. Give them a try link here.
The progressive front and rear springs should improve handling and prevent the wallowing.

Good luck!
Hope this helps!

Posted on Nov 17, 2009

  • 10 Answers

SOURCE: Jetting a 2001 YZ426

will a 1989 yz426 motor fit in all years

Posted on Dec 05, 2009

sisadsl
  • 1508 Answers

SOURCE: stock suspension settings for a 2005 yz 250

my 450 manual has different settings for EU USA an AUS out of 20 clicks between 10-14 out. so the best place to start is count the maximum clicks, and start in the middle, move a couple of clicks at a time and keep notes as its easy to forget. seat should compress about 80-100mm when you sit on it, but will depend on preference,track,mx, enduro etc try and get original manual from last owner

Posted on Apr 08, 2010

  • 653 Answers

SOURCE: factory suspension settings

Spring preload FR
To increase the spring preload and
thereby harden the suspension, turn
the adjusting bolt on each fork leg in direction
a. To decrease the spring preload
and thereby soften the
suspension, turn the adjusting bolt on
each fork leg in direction b
NOTE: _
Align the appropriate groove on the adjusting
mechanism with the top of the
front fork cap bolt.
_
CI-10E
Rebound damping force
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the rebound damping force and
thereby soften the rebound damping,
turn the adjusting screw on each fork
leg in direction b.
CI-02E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
on each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the compression damping force
and thereby soften the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction b.
CI-02E
1. Current setting
2. Front fork cap bolt
Setting
Minimum (soft) 8
Standard 6
Maximum (hard) 1
1. Rebound damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 26 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
1. Compression damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 20 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
_
Although the total number of clicks of a
damping force adjusting mechanism
may not exactly match the above specifications
due to small differences in
production, the actual number of clicks
always represents the entire adjusting
range. To obtain a precise adjustment,
it would be advisable to check the number
of clicks of each damping force adjusting
mechanism and to modify the
specifications as necessary
CI-10E
Rebound damping force RR
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw in direction
a. To decrease the rebound
damping force and thereby soften the
rebound damping, turn the adjusting
screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
in direction a. To decrease the compression
damping force and thereby
soften the compression damping, turn
the adjusting screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Setting
Minimum (soft) 1
Standard 4
Maximum (hard) 9

Whole process where need to turn toward "a" means clockwise and "b" counterclockwise. From Yamaha service manual. Hope this is good enough info to help you out. Good?

Posted on May 04, 2010

ckoira57
  • 267 Answers

SOURCE: I am looking for the rear suspension fluid quantities

The fluid quantity is HIGHLY PRESSURIZED NITROGEN GAS. Let a suspension dealer deal with it.

http://www.yamahaownershandbook.com.au/index.php
To get a free download manual for your bike!

Cheers.

Posted on May 08, 2010

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Related Questions:

1 Answer

Adjust rear shocks, 1 - 5, which is stiffer?


Hi, Kevin if you're talking about the shocks on your dune buggy I can't help you, however if you are talking about your motorcycle shocks you're in luck, the setting that compresses the spring the most will be the stiffest. For more information about your issue please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
https://forum.motorcyclenews.com/topic/50159/how-do-i-know-if-my-rear-shock-is-set-properly/3
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May 27, 2016 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

Yamaha settings


bottom of forks turn all the way in, then back out 12 clicks
top of fork - trail riding = all the way out then turn in 2 clicks, track riding = turn in 8 clicks
Rear spring needs to be adjusted so the tip of the rear fender drops 2.75" when sitting on it.
The top adjustment (compression valve) will be close to all the way out for trail and 5 to 8 clicks turned in for track.
The bottom adjustment meters how slow or fast the shock extends (rebound). Stand on something at peg height with one foot on the peg and the other on your stand and shove the bike down. Adjust the bottom (rebound) clicker to match the front of the bike so that both return to top at the same time.
This is a good starting point for any bike.
To fine tune your suspension it is always best to have a suspension tech watch you ride and make adjustments until the chassis of the bike stays flat while the suspension does its work. Usually take a tech 20 minutes to set the front and rear compression and rebound track-side!

Jul 05, 2014 | 2003 Yamaha YZ 250 F

1 Answer

My soft tail rides really stiff on rough roads. What can I do to soften the ride. Seems like the front forks are stiff. Just had shocks serviced.


As far as the rear suspension, a softtail won't ride a smooth as one with a swingarm, as the softtail has less travel.

On the front end, Harley has three different "thicknesses" of fork oil, light, medium, and heavy, which gives different suspension dampening.

If the front forks are too stiff, you could try a lighter fork oil.

Feb 14, 2014 | 2007 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage...

1 Answer

I need to know the factory settings for the front and rear suspension on my 2004 Honda cb1300


There is no factory setting. Each motorcycle needs to be set up by the rider for there particular weight. How you set it up depends on whether both the front and rear suspension are adjustable or not. Basically when you sit on the motorcycle with your gear on you want the front and the back of the motorcycle to drop at the same time. This mostly comes into play on hard or extreme cornering. If the front is too soft, the front wheel might wash out first affectively placing you in the face plant position. Likewise if the back slides out first, and it does not go too far,you at least have a chance to recover. Worst case scenario you will high side and again achieve the face plant position. If you have adjustable pressure on the front forks set the front air pressure first to soft or stiff (depending on which you prefer) , then tighten or loosen the spring on the rear shock or, raise or lower the rear shock air pressure to achieve the front and back both dropping at the same time when you bounce on the seat.If there is no front fork adjustment then adjust the back to match the front. If you carry a passenger the rear will need to be stiffened . At least be aware of the difference in handling, if you decide not to readjust for a short drive, to take it easy with passenger on the back. If you are adjusting clicker shocks, Turn the screws and count the clicks. Best starting point is the middle position (5 out of ten). Make minor adjustments to the dampening from there.

May 30, 2011 | 2004 Honda CB 1300

1 Answer

The rear of the car sets higher than the front, suspension is stiff in the back to. Is there a suspension control system that is not working


There's a level sensor in the back of most cars that have air ride suspension such as Cadillac Devilles.

If there is plenty of pressure, it's probably not a leaky air shock aborber nor is it a bad air pump under the hood.

Nov 11, 2010 | 1994 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

What can be done to improve the forks so they are not so stiff for fire roading and light off roading.


First, use the owners manual and check the setting of the compression damping. Set the compression damping a bit lighter and try it out. This will make the forks feel less stiff, but the fork springs could still be too stiff for your weight. Make sure the rear air spring has enough air in it too, this can adversely effect handling.

Next step, Work with a reputable off-road suspension shop to set up the bike for your weight and riding abilities. There is not much you can do with the rear air spring/shock, but I found that it worked quite well.

A couple of good suspension tuning shops are Enduro Engineering, Factory Connection. etc. Most of the good shops will require that you remove the forks and send them in for re-spring or re-valve work.

Ask at your local dealer that sells a lot of motorcross type bikes about good suspension shops in your area.

Nov 03, 2010 | 2007 BMW G 650 Xchallenge

1 Answer

Hi, having a problem with the suspension of my GT 250. When i ride it the rear suspension seems to go down and stick down then reluctantly come back up...any ideas please?


  1. Shock absorbers are shot
  2. Add spring pressure to shocks
  3. Swingarm needs to be greased
  4. All of the above
If the shocks are shot then you will need to find replacements. If I recall correctly, the bottom half of the shock had an adjustment ring that turned to add spring pressure. There were 4 settings indexed in the ring. The swing arm may need cleaning and grease. If stiff, it could be the problem. You may need to remove the wheel and the shocks to get the swingarm off for adding grease at the hinge point.

Jul 05, 2009 | 1972 Honda CB 250

3 Answers

Yamaha yz250 suspension settings


There is too much involved to include everything, but I can describe to you what everything does.

You have compression dampening which slows the rate at which the shock or forks can compress. Then you have rebound dampening which slows the rate at which the shock or forks can extend.

The compression adjuster on the rear shock is toward the top, sticking out sideways where the resivoir mounts to the side of the shock. The rebound adjuster can be seen below the swing arm on the side of the shock.

The compression adjusters on the front forks can be seen from the top. (its the one in the center, the other is an air bleed) The rebound adjuster is in the center of the lower fork leg, and can be seen from below the fork.



The settings are measured in the number of "clicks" from seated. More clicks from seated will be softer, and less clicks from seated will be stiffer. The best thing to do is to see where you are now and adjusting from there. I like to write them down as I go. Turn the adjuster clockwise untill it stops and take note of the number of clicks. DO NOT FORCE IT! You should also check your service manual and take note of the standard setting, and also take note of the maximum number of clicks you can go from seated. You dont want to screw the adjusters out farther than the max, shock damage can result.

You might try changing to the standard settings and try adjusting from there. If the bike doesnt ride at least moderately decent at the standard settings, your shock and/or forks may need a rebuild.


Generally speaking more compression dampening in the rear will result in less bottoming but a harsher ride. Less would result in the oppisite.

More rebound dampening in the rear will result in too slow of extension and packing up which will make the bike swap in the whoops, but it will not tend to buck you or throw you into a nose dive over a jump. Less would result in the oppisite.

In the front, more compression dampening will be about the same situation as described above with the shock.

More rebound dampening in the front forks can tend to take pressure off of the front wheel in corners causing washout, but too little can make the bike want to loop out over jumps.

Nov 21, 2008 | 2003 Yamaha YZ 250

1 Answer

Adjustng the suspension


adjust your sag but i saw a pro do it with no more than 4 inches. Be sure your wearing all your gear when checking the sag. For rebound if the back of the bike is coming up and hit your butt when your on the breaks before a corner you have to much rear rebound. One good idea is to have a friend film you while you ride to see what the bike is doing. If it packs down to little rebound if it jumps up and down to much rebound. Compression will adjust how fast the shocks move in. If your at a track your suspension should bottom out on the biggest jump which should be about once a lap. Most bikes are set up to wear you don't really need to move the compression or rebound clickers. First thing have to do as I said before is to adjust your sag.

Nov 10, 2008 | 2005 KTM EXC 200

1 Answer

Adjustng the suspension


adjust your sag but i saw a pro do it with no more than 4 inches. Be sure your wearing all your gear when checking the sag. For rebound if the back of the bike is coming up and hit your butt when your on the breaks before a corner you have to much rear rebound. One good idea is to have a friend film you while you ride to see what the bike is doing. If it packs down to little rebound if it jumps up and down to much rebound. Compression will adjust how fast the shocks move in. If your at a track your suspension should bottom out on the biggest jump which should be about once a lap. Most bikes are set up to wear you don't really need to move the compression or rebound clickers. First thing have to do as I said before is to adjust your sag.

Nov 10, 2008 | 2008 HM CRE F250R

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