Question about 1999 Titan Gecko RM

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How easy is it to replace the clutch cable? Take the old out and out new one in?

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Thats pretty much it,very easy job,should not take more than half hour

Posted on Jul 04, 2009

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I have had a new clutch fitted and clutch cable but my pedel is very hard why


no car stated, nor a year, wow, just a Suzuki.
toss coin i do.... land
the Sidekicks (or Vitara), have cable clutch
and go bad about 150k miles, rust and jam.
its a 25 dollar fix. and easy.
they all do that. every one. this old.
end guess. on car. but applies to all cars, with cable clutches old.

Mar 03, 2016 | Suzuki Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Old clutch cable snapped, tried replacing with new one, no pressure on the cable?


The first thing that comes to mind is that the new clutch cable is not the correct length (too long). Did you compare the old one with the new one? When you pull in the clutch lever you should be able to see the clutch release lever at the transmission move. If the lever is not moving then the cable is too long or needs adjustment.

Apr 24, 2014 | 2003 Suzuki GZ 125 Marauder

1 Answer

Need new clutchplate & pressure plate for manua


Instructions
  1. Remove the Old Clutch
    • 1Verify that your vehicle's clutch is the source of your problems and not the pedal-arm bushings, activating cables or the slave-master cylinder.
    • 2Unhook the positive battery cable, the clutch cable or hydraulic slave cylinder to get the transaxle ready for easy removal. Eliminate anything that may hinder your efforts, including exhaust pipes and the speedometer.
    • 3
    • Secure your car in a safe position before jacking up the front end.
    • 4Stabilize the engine with a jack below the oil pan. Remove the transaxle by undoing at least one engine mount.
    • 5Separate the engine from the transaxle by removing the bolts that surround the flywheel bell housing.
    • 6Push the transaxle away from the engine until the input shift clears the pressure plate.
    • 7Disengage the bolts surrounding the pressure plate and take it and the clutch disc out. Check to see if the flywheel's friction surface is scored, checked or has hot spots. Remove, machine and reinstall the flywheel, if needed.
    • 8Examine the pilot bearing (bushing) located at the flywheel's center to be sure the needle bearings are lubricated and that there's no galling. Also look for any oil leaking around the rear main engine seal.
    Replace the Clutch
    • 9Follow the instructions for replacing your car's clutch carefully to avoid having to remove the transaxle.
    • 10Check that the transaxle's input shaft isn't leaking; replace if needed.
    • 11Take out the flywheel and the old seal and install a new seal.
    Install a New Clutch
    • 12Clean the crankshaft flange before putting in the flywheel. With the flywheel on top of the flange, secure the bolts in a star formation to the specified torque for your vehicle.
    • 13Install the clutch disc and pressure plate. Prior to putting in the transaxle, attach the new release bearing to the release fork. The fork should move freely.
    • 14Hoist the transaxle into position and move it forward until the input shaft glides into the clutch disc's spindled hole. Do not apply force.
    • 15Reinstall any bolts or mounts that were removed to replace your car's clutch. Grab the transaxle, release the jack and lower your vehicle.
    • 16Consider replacing your car's clutch cable. If you don't replace the cable at least adjust it for the right amount of free-play.
    • 17Confirm that your clutch's self-adjusting action is performing correctly by depressing the slave cylinder's piston into its bore.
    • 18Drive your car to be sure your clutch is working properly.

Sep 03, 2012 | 1987 Nissan Pickup

1 Answer

Replacing 91 suzuki gs500e clutch cable


Hi, if you are ok doing this type of job, then its quite easy to fit a cable, remove the seat, undo the 2 bolts securing the fuel tank and prop up the back end of the fuel tank, remove the gear change lever by removing the 10mm bolt, remove all the screws holding the sprocket caseing, next comes the cable with the case still on the engine undo the locking nut on the clutch cable, (12 mm), next get the new cable and lay it along side the whole length of the old cable and fasten it to the frame where ness, screw in the addjuster all the way at the clutch lever and align the slot for cable removal from the lever now remove the sprocket cover and old cable with it, undo the cable adduster all the way until it is removed from the case, push the cable wire back to remove it from the clutch control arm inside the case, try not to remove the arm as it will fit back in more than 1 position, retaining the original position is important, you can then refit the new cable into the arm a small amount of grease on the cable nipple will help, replace the case back onto the engine it should fit flush with no effort, replace all the screws, it important they are fitted in accordance, so place them loosly in the holes they should all protude around the same amount, if any are shorter or longer move them around untill correct. Once happy tighten them up, connect the cable at the control lever on the handlebar and then remove all the slack from the cable at both ends untill you have around 5mm free play at the handlebar end, replace gear change lever, and all other fixings.

Aug 18, 2011 | 2004 Suzuki GS 500 F

1 Answer

Easy steps for replacing clutch lever? -Mark


Follow the clutch cable downward until you get to the rubber bellows that covers the clutch cable adjuster. Slide the bellows up or down to gain access to the adjuster. Loosen the lock nut and turn the adjuster inwards making the cable as short as possible.

Remove the pivot pin for the lever and rotate the lever forward. Positon the lever so that it will come off the cable end. Lubricate the cable end and replace the lever with the new one. Reposition the lever and install the pivot pin. Readjust the cable adjuster so that you have approximately 1/8" of free travel in the lever.

Good Luck
Steve

Jun 18, 2010 | 2003 Harley Davidson XL 1200 C Sportster...

1 Answer

I need to fit a clutch cable to my kawasaki z1b900 i need step by step instructions please


To remove the old cable first shorten the mid-cable adjuster to give as much free play as possible. If you need more free play screw in the adjuster at the clutch lever as much as possible and line up the slots so you can disconnect the cable from the clutch lever. Then remove the shift lever, and possibly the left footrest if needed to remove the front sprocket cover. Remove the cotter pin and disconnect the cable from the clutch release lever. Make a note of the routing of the old cable so you can replace it. Install the new cable with a new cotter pin at the lower end first, and route it the same as the old cable. To adjust the new cable, shorten the mid-cable adjuster as much as possible. At the clutch lever, turn the adjuster in and leave about 1/4" of threads showing between the locknut and the lever body. With the front sprocket cover still off, loosen the locknut on the clutch release lever and back the screw 3 or 4 turns. Turn the clutch adjusting screw in until it becomes hard to turn and then back it off 1/2 of a turn and tighten the locknut. Now lenghten the mid-cable adjuster until there is no free play and tighten the locknuts. Check that the lower end of the cable is fully seated in it's socket. At the clutch lever, turn the adjuster in so you have 1/16" free play, and tighten the locknut. Replace the front sproket cover and the shift lever and footrest.

Dec 23, 2009 | 1975 kawasaki Z1B

1 Answer

Clutch wont engage


It sounds like the clutch must be incorrectly assembled. No offense meant, is is easy to miss one little thing. Go to the site below and look at the clutch diagram. Note that the assembly begins and ends with a friction plate and that a metal pressure plate goes between each friction plate. You should have 7 metal pressure plates and 8 friction plates.

The clutch outer basket seldom goes bad unless hit with a hammer or a tree. Why did it need to be replaced? Did you compare the new OEM hub to the old one? They may have given you the wrong basket. The tighter the cable the less likely the clutch will engage. You should have 1/4" end play at the handlebar lever. By the way, exactly what oil did you put in the gearbox after replacing the clutch? Okay, this is a good start. Post a comment if you need to get back to me.

Please rate this solution. Thanks!

Jun 06, 2009 | 1998 kawasaki KDX 200

1 Answer

How do you replace clutch in 1997 toyota corolla? Do you need to replace entire clutch assy or just the clutch disc?


I see. sounds like you need a new clutch. OK, here is a step by step guide to follow. it will help with the removal and installation of your new clutch.

Remove the Old Clutch Step1 Verify that your vehicle's clutch is the source of your problems and not the pedal-arm bushings, activating cables or the slave-master cylinder. Step2 Unhook the positive battery cable, the clutch cable or hydraulic slave cylinder to get the transaxle ready for easy removal. Eliminate anything that may hinder your efforts, including exhaust pipes and the speedometer. Step3 Secure your car in a safe position before jacking up the front end. Step4 Stabilize the engine with a jack below the oil pan. Remove the transaxle by undoing at least one engine mount. Step5 Separate the engine from the transaxle by removing the bolts that surround the flywheel bell housing. Step6 Push the transaxle away from the engine until the input shift clears the pressure plate. Step7 Disengage the bolts surrounding the pressure plate and take it and the clutch disc out. Check to see if the flywheel's friction surface is scored, checked or has hot spots. Remove, machine and reinstall the flywheel, if needed. Step8 Examine the pilot bearing (bushing) located at the flywheel's center to be sure the needle bearings are lubricated and that there's no galling. Also look for any oil leaking around the rear main engine seal. Replace the clutch Step1 Follow the instructions for replacing your car's clutch carefully to avoid having to remove the transaxle. Step2 Check that the transaxle's input shaft isn't leaking; replace if needed. Step3 Take out the flywheel and the old seal and install a new seal. Install a New Clutch Step1 Clean the crankshaft flange before putting in the flywheel. With the flywheel on top of the flange, secure the bolts in a star formation to the specified torque for your vehicle. Step2 Install the clutch disc and pressure plate. Prior to putting in the transaxle, attach the new release bearing to the release fork. The fork should move freely. Step3 Hoist the transaxle into position and move it forward until the input shaft glides into the clutch disc's spindled hole. Do not apply force. Step4 Reinstall any bolts or mounts that were removed to replace your car's clutch. Grab the transaxle, release the jack and lower your vehicle. Step5 Consider replacing your car's clutch cable. If you don't replace the cable at least adjust it for the right amount of free-play. Step6 Confirm that your clutch's self-adjusting action is performing correctly by depressing the slave cylinder's piston into its bore. Step7 Drive your car to be sure your clutch is working properly.


PLease rate and god bless:)

Apr 03, 2009 | 1997 Toyota Corolla

3 Answers

Saturn shifter linkage


Check the cable clips at the trans. Sometimes these clips come out and won't shift. Horseshoe clips that hold the cable housing.

Dec 21, 2008 | 2002 Saturn VUE

2 Answers

Clutch cable for Nimbus (1988)


As easy to remove ,

Yes you can do this at your home your personal garage,

THNX,




May 22, 2008 | 1990 Mitsubishi Minivan

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