Question about 2001 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide Ultra Classic

3 Answers

Noise in Engine


I have what appears to be valve noise in my engine My mechanic thought it was primary or secondary chains. after tarring it down he said they looked fine. so I drove the bike a bit longer until I cant stand the noise. So I had the engine rebuilt at 40K the bike did not make the noise when I bought it 3 months pryer. since the rebuild it is still making the very same noise. So they installed a new second set of lifters it did not help. I still hear the noise but now the mechanic said he can't hear it. If you have any ideas I would sure like to hear theme Thanks Bob

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  • rlhorton1 May 30, 2009

    I have a tapping noise in my Motor and it seems to get a bit louder as the motor gets hotter

  • Dick
    Dick May 11, 2010

    From the information you have provided it is impossible to make a reasonable diagnosis.

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I have an '01 Ultra injected Twin Cam. Bought it a yr ago w/ 30k miles. After some research, pulled the cam plate and found all in fine shape EXCEPT for both cam chain tensioners showing wear to the recommended replacement limit in the Harley manual illustrations. Was considering conversion to gear drive. But since everything is good except the shoes (and I've learned HD went to a tougher material in '03), gonna try the economy route. I don't think the lifters are bad, but with 30 k miles and hours of "my labor", plan to change them while in there.
Wish me luck!

Posted on Sep 05, 2011

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Check to see if they used the correct oil filter for your bike

Posted on Jun 28, 2009

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Try these for valve train noise:

1. Low oil pressure caused by oil feed pump not functioning
properly or oil passages obstructed.
2. Faulty hydraulic lifter(s).
3. Bent push rod(s).
4. Incorrect push rod length.
5. Rocker arm binding on shaft.
6. Valve sticking in guide.
7. Chain tensioning spring or shoe worn.
8. Cam(s), cam gear(s) or cam bushing(s) worn.
9. Cam timing incorrect.

Posted on Jun 06, 2009

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1 Answer

My SUZUKI SAMURAI BIKE IS HAVING TICKLING NOISE COMING FROM ENGINE , KINDLY SUGGEST HOW TO RECTIFY


You have no guarantie, where is the problem to open it? what will you lose?
If is not piston noise, should be the distribuition chain or even the valves, you can check if the chain is enough tense, or if the sound comes from valves, maybe you should rectify the seat valves and change them.
Hope that this helps you!

Oct 06, 2014 | Suzuki Motorcycles

1 Answer

Whinning noise in the primary chain case. I alreadt replace the tensioner shoe


With the engine running, put the transmission into gear and sit there with the clutch lever pulled in. Do you still hear the noise. If so, most likely the noise is in the primary itself rather than the transmission. Since you didn't specify whether the bike is a Sportster or a BIg Twin, it's difficult to say what the noise may be. It could be a bearing going bad. The problem with that is that you can disassemble the bike and never find the bearing. It could be the big bearing in the outer clutch shell or it could the mainshaft support bearing in the inner primary if it's a big twin. A Sportster has basically the same bearings but in different areas. If the bike is equipped with one of those automatic primary chain tensioners, I've seen them make a noise as well. Then again, a noise like that is very difficult to find. It seems to travel all through the engine. It could possibly be an inner cam bearing going bad. They sound exactly like the alternator whine on a Chevrolet. If you have one of those mechanic's stethoscopes or long screwdriver, listen to various places on your engine to try to locate the noise more closely.

Good Luck
steve

Apr 03, 2011 | Harley Davidson FXDX Dyna Super Glide...

1 Answer

Aligning the valve timing mareks except twincam engine


Timing Chain, Sprockets, Front Cover and Seal REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION Crankshaft Damper and Front Oil Seal
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Negative battery cable
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Cooling fans
    • Crankshaft pulley and damper, using a holding fixture as shown
    • Front crankshaft seal Fig. 1: Crankshaft pulley removal tool - V8 9301jg12.gif
    To install:
  3. Install oil seal replacer tool JD-235 to the oil seal. Use the nut and bolt provided with the tool to fully seat the seal to the timing cover.
  4. For dampers which DO NOT utilize a spit locking ring:
    1. Apply a thin, even coating of Loctite® 648 to the damper bore. Do not apply it to the end faces or to the crankshaft.
    2. Install the crankshaft damper onto the crankshaft. Wipe off any Loctite that has squeezed out from the front of the damper.
    3. Install the locking tool to the damper. Tighten the bolt to 59 ft. lbs. (80 Nm), plus an 80 degree turn.
  5. For dampers which utilize a spit locking ring:
    1. Install a new O-ring seal to the damper.
    2. Install the crankshaft damper.
    3. Apply petroleum jelly to the damper bore and O-ring seal.
    4. Install the damper onto the crankshaft.
    5. Install the split locking ring onto the crankshaft, inside the center bore of the damper.
    6. Install the locking tool to the damper.
    7. Tighten the damper bolt to 266-285 ft. lbs. (364-386 Nm).
    8. Remove the locking tool from the damper.
  6. Install or connect the following:
    • Cooling fans
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Negative battery cable
  7. Start the engine and check for leaks.
Timing Cover
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Drain the cooling system.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Negative battery cable
    • Upper radiator hose
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Water pump pulley
    • Accessory drive belt tensioner
    • Idler pulley
    • Crankshaft damper
    • Engine appearance covers
    • Mass Air Flow (MAF) meter
    • Air intake assembly
    • Ignition coils
    • Canister purge valve
    • Valve covers
    • Variable Valve Timing (VVT) solenoids
    • Engine harness retaining clips
    • Timing cover
    To install: Fig. 2: Sealant application points - V8 9301jg23.gif
    Fig. 3: Timing cover torque sequence-V8 9307jg01.gif

  4. Apply sealant to the 8 joints on the engine face as shown.
  5. Install or connect the following:
    • Timing cover with new seals. Tighten the bolts in sequence to 96-120 inch lbs. (11-13 Nm).
    • Engine harness retaining clips
    • VVT solenoids
    • Valve covers
    • Canister purge valve
    • Ignition coils
    • Air intake assembly
    • MAF meter
    • Engine appearance covers
    • Crankshaft damper
    • Idler pulley
    • Accessory drive belt tensioner
    • Water pump pulley
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Upper radiator hose
    • Negative battery cable
  6. Fill the cooling system.
  7. Start the engine and check for leaks.
Timing Chain 6 CYLINDER
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions in the beginning of this section.
  2. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Negative battery cable
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Valve cover
    • Timing chain cover
    • Variable Valve Timing (VVT) sensor
    • Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor
  3. Rotate the crankshaft until the triangular arrow indent on the driveplate is visible through the access hole.
  4. Install the Crankshaft Setting Peg JD 216 into the CKP sensor location.
  5. Install the Camshaft Locking tool JD 215 on the camshafts.
  6. Remove or disconnect the following:
    • Camshaft sprocket mounting bolt by loosening it
    • VVT mounting bolt by loosening it
    • Camshaft Locking tool JD 215
    • Primary timing chain tensioner and backing plate
    • Primary timing chain guide
    • VVT unit and exhaust camshaft sprocket
    • Secondary timing chain tensioner and guide
    NOTE: Keep all valvetrain components in order for assembly. To install:
  7. Prepare the timing chain tensioners for installation by using a paperclip or other wire to unseat the check valves and compressing the pistons into their bores.
  8. Install or connect the following:
    • Secondary timing chain guide. Tighten the bolt to 89-124 inch lbs. (10-14 Nm).
    • Secondary timing chain tensioner. Tighten the bolt to 89-124 inch lbs. (10-14 Nm).
    • VVT, secondary timing chain and exhaust cam sprocket
    • Primary timing chain
    • Primary timing chain guide. Tighten the bolt to 10-12 ft. lbs. (13-16 Nm).
    • Primary timing chain tensioner and backing plate. Tighten the bolts to 89-124 inch lbs. (10-14 Nm).
    • Primary timing chain slack, eliminate it by placing a wedge between the primary timing chain tensioner and the guide shoe
    • Secondary timing chain by applying counterclockwise force to the exhaust camshaft sprocket. Fig. 4: Apply force in a counterclockwise direction when tightening the sprocket mounting bolts - 6 cylinder 9301jg03.gif

    • Exhaust and intake VVT sprocket bolts. Tighten them to 85-92 ft. lbs. (115-125 Nm).
  9. Remove the tools and wedges.
  10. Install or connect the following:
    • CKP sensor
    • VVT sensor
    • Coolant outlet pipe
    • ECT sensor connector
    • Radiator and heater hoses
    • Timing chain cover
    • Valve cover
    • Accessory drive belt
    • Negative battery cable
  11. Fill the cooling system.
  12. Start the engine and check for leaks.
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Jan 28, 2011 | 1999 Jaguar XK8

1 Answer

Engine chain type noise at low rpm engine has approx 40 thousand kilos on a 2008 electric glide classic


Have you checked the tension on the primary chain lately? Take the oval shaped inspection cover off the the primary cover on the right side of the bike. Check the tension on the top run of the primary chain in the middle of the run. You should have between 5/8" (15.8mm) to 7/8" (19.0mm) with the engine COLD. To adjust loosen the nut that holds the primary chain shoe in place and raise the plate to tighten the chain, lower it to loosen. Since working through the inspection cover hole is tedious, some people elect to take the outer primary cover off and then set the tension. Refill the primay with 36 to 42 ounces of the appropiate oil. Harly uses H-D Syn3 20W50 synthetic engine oil in the primary.

If the noise seems to be coming from the right hand side of the engine, it could be the cam chain tensioner and shoe. To repair this requires going into the cam chest. This is something that I do not recommend for the amateur mechanic. There are also some special tools required to work in this area.

I hope this helps
Good Luck
Steve

Jul 20, 2010 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

I have a 1982 cb900 that makes a strange noise on


It could be your primary chain and chain guides,the chain wears and the guides harden with time and will transfer more internal engine noise through the transmission.
There is also on the primary hub/sprocket and internal rubber damper all this stuff ages with in time loosing there dampening qualities.
resulting in amplified mechanical noise.

May 07, 2010 | Honda CB 900 Hornet Motorcycles

1 Answer

95 Lincoln Town Car: Engine Makes Loud Tapping Noise


It has to be internal. Is it your valves or a slapping piston? (Sorry but internal engine problems are hard to diagnose without tearing down the engine)

Apr 30, 2010 | 1995 Lincoln Town Car

1 Answer

Excessive noise in primary,probable causes?


When is the last time you checked the adjustment of your primary chain? It should be adjusted to where you have 3/4 to 7/8 inch up and down play when checked in the middle of the upper section of the chain when COLD. I like to set the chain at the 3/4 inch setting if possible. As the engine/transmission heats up, the chain will tighten up. If the chain is too loose, it will rub the top of the inside of the inner primary cover when you back off on the throttle.

Also, you didn't say how many miles your bike has on it. You could need to replace the nylon shoe on the primary chain adjuster mechanism if it's worn badly. Also, I've seen a lot of spring cups on the compensator sprocket go bad. Remove the outer primary cover and try to turn this cup with you hands. If you can turn it by hand, you probably need to replace it. This will make a "clop, clop, clop" type noise when idling. While in the primary, check the torque on the engine sprocket nut. It should be 150-165 foot pounds. You will need a primary locking tool to check this as the engine will turn over before you reach that torque level.

Feb 09, 2010 | 2003 Harley Davidson FLHT Electra Glide...

2 Answers

Growling engine noise only at idle. Cam area


Take all of the belts off for a short run at idle. If the sound goes away it is pulley related, spin each pulley and listen for bearing noise, also check for play at this time.

If the noise does not go away when the motor is driving no accessories you have a more serious problem.

Jan 13, 2010 | 1991 Oldsmobile 88

2 Answers

2007 FLHTCU Transmission Noisy 5th gear


Wow, valves and other related engine noises don't care what gear you are in, they still make the noise. However your motor may be "lugging" in 5th gear which can cause a symptom of an engine related issue.
You may have an issue with the actual gearbox its self.
There is a primary drive chain that may be worn which will cause excessive noise in top gear because it is putting the greatest load on the engine. This is what connects the engine to the transmission. I think there is a tensioner for your model that will allow you to adjust the free play in the primary drive chain. If not I strongly recommend replacement because this will cause major damage if it breaks.

Dec 22, 2008 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage...

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