Question about 2000 Yamaha YZF-R6

2 Answers

Cleaning Carb Jets

If I clean my carbs will l have to adjust the pilot screw or sync the carbs --- is that going to happen by cleaning or replacing parts such as needle jet, needle valve, and carb jets? Syncing the carbs does not sound so bad if you have the vacuum presure gage but adjusting the pilot screw sounds like it would be tough.

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Not to a trained ear also go by rpm and spark plug color

NOTE: use copper wire to clean jets, sync is just thottles are same position as all carb's just leave them adjustments alone will be fine if are out use a 1/8 drill an place in between piston/butterfly to carb bore to sync/calibrate

better use a manometer for adjusting screws

depends on condition of org parts

worn = richer running

new = lean an clean

also if changed the exhaust system need to
re-calibrate carbs for max performance

Posted on May 09, 2009

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You shouldn't have to adjust anything as long as you don't increase the jet size and put everything back the same way it is removed.

Posted on May 09, 2009

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1 Answer

1999 Kawasaki ZX9R I have cleaned all carbs, checked all jets but I only have fuel coming out of 1 and 2. 3 and 4 get fuel at open throttle. all ports are open just like 1 and 2.


Hi, Michael sounds like you may have clogged transfer ports that external cleaning is not removing or there is a choke issue on 3&4 you may want to try a carb dip (very effective) and a carb sync. For more information about your question and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
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Dec 29, 2016 | 2000 kawasaki ZX-9 R Ninja

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I need to know the proper tuning of ucal mikuni carburetor with mixture adjusting screw on bottom of cabr (beneath float bowl), an idle adjust screw and pilot screw (hopefully pilot fuel screw since s


Why did you need to clean the carb? Routine servicing of the aircleaner would keep the carb clean for life. The pilot screw should be 1.5 turns out approx. with a small adjustment either way. Idle speed is set to a smooth low idle.If this doesn't fix it have you got something in the carb not replaced correctly? The float needle/float assy? How did you clean it? Have you introduced fluff/dirt into the carb and did you blow it clean with an airline?

Oct 09, 2014 | Motorcycles

2 Answers

Bike sat 4 yrs wont stay running


Most likely the jets are 'gummed up'. I would first completely disassemble the carb and clean everything compressed air works well to clean out the tiny openings etc. Once you've cleaned everything and reassembled the carb, you would ideally want to have drained the gas tank and lines and replenish with fresh fuel.

Jul 15, 2014 | 2004 Suzuki DR 650 SE

1 Answer

I just bought a 1978 650b.It needs alot of tlc.carbs look clean when i took them apart.looks like a pretty good set of points.bought brand new plugsit doesn't want to idle below 1500 rpm by it self.idle...


Replace the pilot and main jets then really clean the carbs soak them in a good carb cleaner. When you re assemble the carbs make sure you have the air screws turned all the way in then one full turn out start from that setting.

Jul 19, 2010 | 1977 kawasaki Z 650

1 Answer

I've inherited a 1985 Virago 1000 with 16000 miles on the speedo. It will only run rough with the choke on. I replaced the battery with a new one when I got the bike. Since then I cleaned the carbs,...


the carburetors will need thoroughly cleaned and related rubber vacuum and fuel hoses will need replaced. Use fuel rated hose on fuel lines.
Gasoline goes bad with time and in as little as 3-4 weeks. This effect is known as varnishing. Jets and passageways within carburetors become obstructed when varnishing occurs.
Liquid gasoline changes chemically into a gel like substance. Advanced stages of varnishing results with the solid gel changing into a crystal powder substance. Interior carb surfaces are etched in the process and may require carb replacement.
The choke and pilot circuits with most motorcycle carburetors share passageways. When pilot jets become obstructed, the choke circuit compensates and allows engine to start and idle with choke, but stalls without choke.

---------
FOR MORE HELP:---
Carb Cleaning 101
The elements of internal combustion engines are; correct fuel/air ratio, spark at right time, adequate cylinder compression. Motorcycle and ATV carburetors have many passageways and openings to check and clean. Subtle to radical effects on engine performance occur when jets and passageways become obstructed. Vacuum leaks and carburetor synchronization also effect performance and should be checked and adjusted. The following procedures are a helpful guideline.
Carb Cleaning 101:----Warning: Remove all rubber (Neoprene) parts before applying chemicals to carburetor parts. These parts usually include vacuum diaphragms, needle valves, o’rings, hoses, and other parts. Spray cleaners may damage these parts. Do not disassemble individual carbs from the carb brackets.
Air & Fuel Passageways: Trace individual fuel and air circuit passageways from beginning to end. Machines can only drill straight paths through castings to form passageways. A change of direction or angle means drilling additional connecting passageways. Access holes left by the drilling process are plugged with brass or bronze beads. Inspect and clean each passageway with spray cleaner, brushes, pipe cleaners, and compressed air. Many household items can be useful cleaning tools. Remove any discoloration and debris from carbs. Look for carb spray cleaner to exit from one or more passageways. Chase immediately with compressed air.
Jet Cleaning: Inspect jets by holding to light and look through them. You should see an unobstructed round hole. Clean the jets with one or more of the following; jet-cleaning wires, soak solutions, carb spray cleaners and compressed air. Re-inspect jets after cleaning and install when clear of obstructions. Some main jets have paper-like gaskets. Most have metal spacers between the jet and the emulsion tube. Some screw directly into a brass emulsion tube, which is machined for a 7mm wrench at its float chamber, exposed base.
Inlet Fuel Valve: Inspect the needle valve & spring. Press down the tiny metal rod that protrudes from the **** or float end of the needle valve. The spring should move freely and return the rod to its location. Check the needle valve’s seat area for a groove or other wear. It should appear highly polished. Some needle valve seats are rubber and wear may not be visible. Inspect the needle valve jet seat. You can clean the jet seat with Q-tips and semi-chrome polish if necessary.
Carb Body Castings: Blow air through the atmospheric vent holes located on the dome of each float bowl chamber. Air should exit via hoses or brass nipples. Inspect the emulsion tubes and passageways (cast towers that jets thread into) for discoloration and debris. Clean interior emulsion towers with a soft bristle gun cleaning brush. Clean each Venturi (main carb bore).
Needle Jets & Jet Needles: Clean the needle jets, jet needles, and emulsion tower (main jet screws into). Clean the emulsion tube (pipe between needle jet and main jet) (Main Jet may screw into emulsion tube). Jet needles are part of the throttle slides. See below…
Throttle Slides: There are several types of throttle slides: Mechanical linkage, vacuum, diaphragm, and cable. Disassembling the jet needle from the slide is not always required for cleaning. If you have vacuum piston type throttle slides (large diameter solid metal slide), avoid cleaning the lubrication from sides and caps. If piston type check cap vents and passageways with air. Clean if necessary and re-lube. If you have rubber vacuum throttle diaphragms, inspect for dry rot, defects, and tears by gently stretching rubber away from center. Do this until all areas around diaphragm have been inspected. Replace any defective part as described above. Clean carb body areas around diaphragm including air passageways and air jets. Diaphragms have a locator loop or tab fabricated into their sealing edge. Observe this locator upon reassembly. Avoid pinching the diaphragm when reinstalling caps.
Fuel Screws: Fuel screws have sharp tapered ends. Carefully turn one fuel screw in while counting the turns until it seats lightly. Warning: These screws are very easily damaged if over tightened into their seats. Record amount of "turns-in" and remove the fuel screw, spring, washer, and o'ring. The fuel screw is part of the enrichment (choke) circuit...clean passageways as described above. When carbs are assembled, spray low PSI compressed air into diaphragm air vents located at intake side of carbs. Throttle slides should rise, then fall when air is removed. Lightly lube external moving linkages. Reinstall carbs and follow through with carburetor synchronization.
Throttle Cables: Lubricate cables periodically. If cables are disconnected from carbs or removed for replacement, etc . . . remember cable routing and ensure proper reinstallation routing. Avoid bread-tying, sharp bends, and pinching cables. Adjust cables so throttle grip has about 5mm of play or throttle slides or butterfly valves may not open completely (full throttle)(wide full open).
Float Bowls: Inspect float bowls for sediment, gum or varnish, crystallization, and defects. Clean all pipes, tubes, passageways, and embedded jets with cleaners and compressed air. Remove and clean the drain screw and area. Inspect bowl gasket and replace if necessary. Clean and inspect overflow pipes and tubes, look for vertical cracks.
This will help. Thanks please keep updated.please do rate the solution positively .thank you for using fixya

Apr 20, 2010 | Yamaha V Star 1100 Classic Motorcycles

3 Answers

I have a 1990 ZX7 which has been sitting for several years. I cleaned the carbs, air filter, petcock, and fuel lines, replaced the battery and can get it to turn over but it will not start. I tried...


Hard to tell until you get it running what's going on there. Did it come from a different elevation than you are at right now? Or has it always been there? And it has been sitting, the carbs might need some major cleaning, the jets need to be cleaned out with a wire, the old gas in there turns into rocks when it sits like that. Get a guitar wire, about .009" and run it through the jets after soaking the parts in carb cleaner.
You might want to fog the cylinders, before cranking it up again. Let them sit for a day or two, then get some fuel in the cylinders, stand back and block your ears, try to get it fired again. Then it will tell you where to go from there. If it doesn't run, check the spark, then go and do the carbs. Hope this helps.

Mar 29, 2010 | 1990 kawasaki ZXR 750

1 Answer

I have a '94 Shadow 600. Engine starts fine. But even after it's warmed up it begins to backfire at idle and dies when I throttle it. Tank is full of gas.I'm certain both cylinders are firing, but no...


BEFORE YOU START
You are haveing carb problems.
Make sure that dirty carbs are actually your problem. Lots of things can make a bike run poorly or not start. Weak battery, corroded electrics, old spark plugs, bad timing, low compression, mis-adjusted valves, dirty air filter, and plugged exhausts can all cause poor running. I'll write an article eventually on how to diagnose poor running conditions shortly, but for now - lets just deal with the carbs.

There are many passageways and openings to check and clean. All are important in function and when obstructed or not working properly, have subtle to radical effects on engine performance. Vacuum leaks and carburetor synchronization also have effects on performance and should be inspected and adjusted following the below procedures.

Carb Cleaning 101
Warning: Remove all rubber parts before you begin. These parts usually include vacuum diaphragms, needle valves, o’rings, hoses, and other parts. Spray cleaners will damage these parts. Do not disassemble individual carbs from the carb bracket.

Air & Fuel Passageways: Trace and learn individual fuel and air circuits from beginning to end. Machines can only drill straight through the cast passageways. To change direction, another angled passageway must be drilled. The union is plugged with a brass or bronze bead. Inspect and clean each passageway with spray cleaner, brushes/pipe cleaners/etc, and compressed air. Remove any discoloration and debris. Look for spray cleaner to exit from one or more passageways.

Jet Cleaning: Inspect jets by holding to light and look through them. You should see an unobstructed round hole. Clean the jets with one or more of the following: jet cleaning wires, soak solutions, carb spray cleaners and compressed air. Re-inspect jets after cleaning and install when clear of obstructions. Some main jets have paper-like gaskets. Most have metal spacers between the jet and the emulsion tube. Some screw directly into a brass emulsion tube which is machined for a 7mm wrench at its float chamber exposed base.

Inlet Fuel Valve: Inspect the needle valve & spring. Press down the tiny metal rod that protrudes from the **** or float end of the needle valve. The spring should move freely and return the rod to its location. Check the needle valve’s seat area for a groove or other wear. It should appear highly polished. Some needle valve seats are rubber and wear may not be visible. Inspect the needle valve jet seat. You can clean the jet seat with Q-tips and semi-chrome polish if necessary.

Carb Body Castings: Blow air through the atmospheric vent holes located on the dome of each float bowl chamber. Air should exit via hoses or brass nipples. Inspect the emulsion tubes and passageways (cast towers that jets thread into) for discoloration and debris. Clean interior emulsion towers with a soft bristle gun cleaning brush. Clean each Venturi (main carb bore).

Needle Jets & Jet Needles: Clean the needle jets, jet needles, and passageway or tower that needle jet screws into. Clean the emulsion tube (pipe between needle jet and main jet) (Main Jet may screw into emulsion tube). Jet needles are part of the throttle slides. See below…

Throttle Slides: There are several types of throttle slides: Mechanical linkage, vacuum, diaphragm, and cable. Disassembling the jet needle from the slide is not always required for cleaning. If you have vacuum piston type throttle slides (large diameter solid metal slide), avoid cleaning the lubrication from sides and caps. If piston type check cap vents and passageways with air. Clean if necessary and re-lube. If you have rubber vacuum throttle diaphragms, inspect for dry-rot, defects, and tears by gently stretching rubber away from center. Do this until all areas around diaphragm have been inspected. Replace any defective part as described above. Clean carb body areas around diaphragm including air passageways and air jets. Diaphragms have a locator loop or tab fabricated into their sealing edge. Observe this locator upon reassembly. Avoid pinching the diaphragm when reinstalling caps.

Fuel Screws: Fuel screws have sharp tapered ends. Carefully turn one fuel screw in while counting the turns until it seats lightly. Warning: These screws are very easily damaged if over tightened into their seats. Record amount of "turns-in" and remove the fuel screw, spring, washer, and o'ring. The fuel screw is part of the enrichment (choke) circuit...clean passageways as described above. When carbs are assembled, spray low PSI compressed air into diaphragm air vents located at intake side of carbs. Throttle slides should rise, then fall when air is removed. Lightly lube external moving linkages. Reinstall carbs and follow through with carburetor synchronization.

Throttle Cables: Lubricate cables periodically. If cables are disconnected from carbs or removed for replacement, etc . . . remember cable routing and ensure proper reinstallation routing. Avoid bread-tying, sharp bends, and pinching cables. Adjust cables so throttle grip has about 5mm of play or throttle slides or butterfly valves may not open completely (full throttle)(wide full open).

Float Bowls: Inspect float bowls for sediment, gum or varnish, crystallization, and defects. Clean all pipes, tubes, passageways, and embedded jets with cleaners and compressed air. Remove and clean the drain screw and area. Inspect bowl gasket and replace if necessary. Clean and inspect overflow pipes and tubes, look for vertical cracks.

Floats: There are several types of float materials: plastic, brass, black composite, tin, and others. Handle floats carefully. Avoid bending, twisting, denting, or other means of mishandling. Most floats are adjustable by bending a small metal tab near the float axle end. Do not change the float adjuster tab unless tuning fuel service levels. Clean metal floats by soaking or by spraying cleaner and wiping clean. Other material type floats may require replacement if cleaning is necessary. Inspect the needle valve (float valve) and seat. Check needle valve’s spring loaded pin. It should depress and return smoothly and without resistance. Check the needle valve’s tip for a worn groove. Replace needle valve and seat if either symptom exists. These parts wear together and must be replaced as a set.

Choke Plungers: It is common for Mikuni slide carburetors to have indented or hardened choke plunger pads. If the pads are worn, indented or hardened with age, then the idle of your bike will vary wildly as the pads no longer seal well.

Synchronization: This is a fine adjustment performed usually and preferably with the carbs installed and the engine running. The unusual part is performed with gauged wire with the carbs on the work bench. Carburetor synchronizing balances Venturi vacuum at the exhaust side of each carburetor, resulting with smooth idling and optimized performance at all throttle openings. Synchronization is checked using a set of gauges which are either air vacuum type or liquid mercury type. The gauges are connected to vacuum ports on the intake manifolds via nipple tubes or if sealed with screws, sync gauge adapters will be needed. With the engine running at temperature, and with a fan or means of forced convection aimed onto the engine, the carbs fuel screws and idle are adjusted, then the synchronization is adjusted via adjustment screws on the carbs. A reserve fuel tank is recommended for convenience of accessing carbs during this procedure. See gauge instructions and repair manuals for detailed use of synchronization gauges.

Notes: While carbs are apart, record the jet sizes. Look for a very small number imprinted on the body of the jets. Verify that numbers are the same for all jets on models with in-line cylinders. A few transverse-4 models and V-engines, the inner and outer carbs use some different size jets and it's important to not mix them up. If you have dial or verneer calipers, measure and record float heights. Perform measurements with floats just touching needle valves, though not depressing the needle valve rods. Replace fuel and vacuum hoses. Be sure to use fuel rated hose for fuel. Install or replace in-line fuel filters. It’s a good time to remove and clean interior petcock fuel filters. Inspect carb manifolds for dry-rotting, inspect all clamps and air ducts. Inspect, clean, lube, and/or replace air filter(s).

Nov 25, 2009 | 1994 Honda VT 600 C Shadow

1 Answer

Clogged carburator, how do I get it out to clean?


BEFORE YOU START
Make sure that dirty carbs are actually your problem. Lots of things can make a bike run poorly or not start. Weak battery, corroded electrics, old spark plugs, bad timing, low compression, mis-adjusted valves, dirty air filter, and plugged exhausts can all cause poor running. I'll write an article eventually on how to diagnose poor running conditions shortly, but for now - lets just deal with the carbs.
There are many passageways and openings to check and clean. All are important in function and when obstructed or not working properly, have subtle to radical effects on engine performance. Vacuum leaks and carburetor synchronization also effect performance and should be inspected and adjusted following the below procedures.

Carb Cleaning 101
Warning: Remove all rubber parts before you begin. These parts usually include vacuum diaphragms, needle valves, o'rings, hoses, and other parts. Spray cleaners will damage these parts. Do not disassemble individual carbs from the carb bracket.

Air & Fuel Passageways: Trace and learn individual fuel and air circuits from beginning to end. Machines can only drill straight through the cast passageways. To change direction, another angled passageway must be drilled. The union is plugged with a brass or bronze bead. Inspect and clean each passageway with spray cleaner, brushes/pipe cleaners/etc, and compressed air. Remove any discoloration and debris. Look for spray cleaner to exit from one or more passageways.

Jet Cleaning: Inspect jets by holding to light and look through them. You should see an unobstructed round hole. Clean the jets with one or more of the following: jet cleaning wires, soak solutions, carb spray cleaners and compressed air. Re-inspect jets after cleaning and install when clear of obstructions. Some main jets have paper-like gaskets. Most have metal spacers between the jet and the emulsion tube. Some screw directly into a brass emulsion tube which is machined for a 7mm wrench at its float chamber exposed base.

Inlet Fuel Valve: Inspect the needle valve & spring. Press down the tiny metal rod that protrudes from the **** or float end of the needle valve. The spring should move freely and return the rod to its location. Check the needle valve's seat area for a groove or other wear. It should appear highly polished. Some needle valve seats are rubber and wear may not be visible. Inspect the needle valve jet seat. You can clean the jet seat with Q-tips and semi-chrome polish if necessary.

Carb Body Castings: Blow air through the atmospheric vent holes located on the dome of each float bowl chamber. Air should exit via hoses or brass nipples. Inspect the emulsion tubes and passageways (cast towers that jets thread into) for discoloration and debris. Clean interior emulsion towers with a soft bristle gun cleaning brush. Clean each Venturi (main carb bore).

Needle Jets & Jet Needles: Clean the needle jets, jet needles, and passageway or tower that needle jet screws into. Clean the emulsion tube (pipe between needle jet and main jet) (Main Jet may screw into emulsion tube). Jet needles are part of the throttle slides. See below…

Throttle Slides: There are several types of throttle slides: Mechanical linkage, vacuum, diaphragm, and cable. Disassembling the jet needle from the slide is not always required for cleaning. If you have vacuum piston type throttle slides (large diameter solid metal slide), avoid cleaning the lubrication from sides and caps. If piston type check cap vents and passageways with air. Clean if necessary and re-lube. If you have rubber vacuum throttle diaphragms, inspect for dry-rot, defects, and tears by gently stretching rubber away from center. Do this until all areas around diaphragm have been inspected. Replace any defective part as described above. Clean carb body areas around diaphragm including air passageways and air jets. Diaphragms have a locator loop or tab fabricated into their sealing edge. Observe this locator upon reassembly. Avoid pinching the diaphragm when reinstalling caps.

Fuel Screws: Fuel screws have sharp tapered ends. Carefully turn one fuel screw in while counting the turns until it seats lightly. Warning: These screws are very easily damaged if over tightened into their seats. Record amount of "turns-in" and remove the fuel screw, spring, washer, and o'ring. The fuel screw is part of the enrichment (choke) circuit...clean passageways as described above. When carbs are assembled, spray low PSI compressed air into diaphragm air vents located at intake side of carbs. Throttle slides should rise, then fall when air is removed. Lightly lube external moving linkages. Reinstall carbs and follow through with carburetor synchronization.

Throttle Cables: Lubricate cables periodically. If cables are disconnected from carbs or removed for replacement, etc . . . remember cable routing and ensure proper reinstallation routing. Avoid bread-tying, sharp bends, and pinching cables. Adjust cables so throttle grip has about 5mm of play or throttle slides or butterfly valves may not open completely (full throttle)(wide full open).

Float Bowls: Inspect float bowls for sediment, gum or varnish, crystallization, and defects. Clean all pipes, tubes, passageways, and embedded jets with cleaners and compressed air. Remove and clean the drain screw and area. Inspect bowl gasket and replace if necessary. Clean and inspect overflow pipes and tubes, look for vertical cracks.

Floats: There are several types of float materials: plastic, brass, black composite, tin, and others. Handle floats carefully. Avoid bending, twisting, denting, or other means of mishandling. Most floats are adjustable by bending a small metal tab near the float axle end. Do not change the float adjuster tab unless tuning fuel service levels. Clean metal floats by soaking or by spraying cleaner and wiping clean. Other material type floats may require replacement if cleaning is necessary. Inspect the needle valve (float valve) and seat. Check needle valve's spring loaded pin. It should depress and return smoothly and without resistance. Check the needle valve's tip for a worn groove. Replace needle valve and seat if either symptom exists. These parts wear together and must be replaced as a set.

Synchronization: This is a fine adjustment performed usually and preferably with the carbs installed and the engine running. The unusual part is performed with gauged wire with the carbs on the work bench. Carburetor synchronizing balances Venturi vacuum at the exhaust side of each carburetor, resulting with smooth idling and optimized performance at all throttle openings. Synchronization is checked using a set of gauges which are either air vacuum type or liquid mercury type. The gauges are connected to vacuum ports on the intake manifolds via nipple tubes or if sealed with screws, sync gauge adapters will be needed. With the engine running at temperature, and with a fan or means of forced convection aimed onto the engine, the carbs fuel screws and idle are adjusted, then the synchronization is adjusted via adjustment screws on the carbs. A reserve fuel tank is recommended for convenience of accessing carbs during this procedure. See gauge instructions and repair manuals for detailed use of synchronization gauges.

Notes: While carbs are apart, record the jet sizes. Look for a very small number imprinted on the body of the jets. Verify that numbers are the same for all jets on models with in-line cylinders. A few transverse-4 models and V-engines, the inner and outer carbs use some different size jets and it's important to not mix them up. If you have dial or veneer calipers, measure and record float heights. Perform measurements with floats just touching needle valves, though not depressing the needle valve rods. Replace fuel and vacuum hoses. Be sure to use fuel rated hose for fuel. Install or replace in-line fuel filters. It's a good time to remove and clean interior petcock fuel filters. Inspect carb manifolds for dry-rotting, inspect all clamps and air ducts. Inspect, clean, lube, and/or replace air filter(s).

Nov 24, 2009 | 2007 Yamaha V Star Classic

1 Answer

I have a Snapper yard cruiser with a 15HP Kohler and Nikki Carb. THis Carb has no way to adjust Idle or High Speed fuel mixture. Since this engine repeatedly stalls with any load on it ecold or hot, I...


Correct that there are no adjustments, but try cleaning the carb jets first, as many times a small amount of debris in the fuel can cause a performance problem. A replacement carb will be close to $200, and NO carbs will be adjustable. A gasket kit is available if you need. Contact your local Briggs dealer to procure the part.

Try cleaning the jets first.
Fuel Starvation - Float Bowl Carburetor
1) remove air filter assembly
*be cautious of tearing the mounting gasket. If it does tear, you HAVE to replace it. It is part of the priming system
2) remove the float bowl fastener. This is the main jet
3) carefully remove the float bowl, the rubber o-ring/gasket will not be able to be used if it is removed, you WILL have to replace it
4) using a spray 'carb cleaner'
spray up thru the center of the carburetor
spray and clean the main jet with cleaner and 'tag' wire
(tag wire is very thin, and can be used to clean the hole in the center of the main jet)
5) clean any debris from inside the bowl or carb body
6) re-install bowl and center bolt, air filter assembly

*if you need gaskets, your Briggs dealer can supply. The kit is cheaper than individual gaskets, and all the parts needed to finish the above repair are in the kit.

Nov 21, 2009 | Garden

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