Question about Husqvarna SM 510 R Motorcycles

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How to harden the forks and rear shock

I'm finding my Front suspension and rear shock a little soft, how do I stiffen the rebound and compression

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  • 88 Answers

Both are adjustable. The forks have an adjustment screw. Press down on the front end while standing next to the bike. It should rebound fairly quick but it shouldn't start to go back down again on it's own (oscillates due to not enough damping). Adjust screws evenly on both forks (exact same amount) clockwise and repeat process mentioned until rebound is smooth and doesn't oscillate. The same applies to the rear but you have only one adjustment on the Ohlins reservoir for the monoshock assembly. Do the bounce test and adjust clockwise until the rebound feels firm and doesn't oscilllate. It should handle like a beast and wheelie much easier now.

Posted on Mar 03, 2015

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: What are the stock suspension settings for a 2003 Honda CR 250 R?

set your compression out 10 or 11 your rebound 9 or 10 and your fork oil height to roughtly 380cc.since its in 03 u should drain the fork oil out, u have to unscrew the top cap of the fork while its in the triple clamps( because its easier this way), loosen then take the fork out of the clamps, unscrew the top caps and pull the fork tube down and turn the fork upside down to drain the oil out then hang the forks up upside down for about 15 minutes then add the new oil right in the fork tube were you'll see a spring, just add the oil in there and you'll be fine and u should replace it with a good medium weight oil

Posted on Feb 04, 2009

raffaiel
  • 209 Answers

SOURCE: VFR400R NC24 front forks are soft. Should they be this soft?

i prepared it to be soft for comfortable riding but if you think that it is to soft try to add some air on it, but check the oil seal of the fork if it has no leak.

Posted on Apr 16, 2009

  • 200 Answers

SOURCE: The rear shock on my 1999 cr 250 dosn't compress,

That's not a cheap shock to buy but i'm afraid it's blown or bent. Bike is 7 years old..I think it's time for a quality shock like a Fox or comparable..............Good luck to you friend.....Tim

Posted on May 10, 2009

nedkelly900
  • 345 Answers

SOURCE: soft front suspension how can i stiffen the front

If it has air caps on the top of the forks, you can put a little air in them. If not, the other thing you can do is add a bit more oil to each fork leg.

Posted on Apr 19, 2010

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sisadsl
  • 1508 Answers

SOURCE: The compression and rebound damping adjusters(top ...

Rebound at the top
Compression at the bottom
only adjust one at a time, by a couple of clicks,and take notes what you changed and what the bike feels like.
If you become unsure start back in the middle of the adjustment.
You can also add a couple of washers for spring tension and change oil level, and oil weight for more options.

Posted on May 24, 2010

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Yamaha settings


bottom of forks turn all the way in, then back out 12 clicks
top of fork - trail riding = all the way out then turn in 2 clicks, track riding = turn in 8 clicks
Rear spring needs to be adjusted so the tip of the rear fender drops 2.75" when sitting on it.
The top adjustment (compression valve) will be close to all the way out for trail and 5 to 8 clicks turned in for track.
The bottom adjustment meters how slow or fast the shock extends (rebound). Stand on something at peg height with one foot on the peg and the other on your stand and shove the bike down. Adjust the bottom (rebound) clicker to match the front of the bike so that both return to top at the same time.
This is a good starting point for any bike.
To fine tune your suspension it is always best to have a suspension tech watch you ride and make adjustments until the chassis of the bike stays flat while the suspension does its work. Usually take a tech 20 minutes to set the front and rear compression and rebound track-side!

Jul 05, 2014 | 2003 Yamaha YZ 250 F

1 Answer

Factory suspension settings yamaha xjr


Rebound - screw on top of fork leg - screw all the way in clockwise then screw out anti clockwise , 1 click for hard, 5 clicks for standard and 10 clicks for soft rebound damping.

compression - bottom of each fork leg - again screw all the way in clockwise and the 1 click anticlockwise for hard, 6 clicks for standard and 13 clicks for soft compression


hope this helps

John

Oct 15, 2011 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

Hi there. i have a 2005 injected fxdwg. it had been sitting for about 18months when i got it and had only 4500k on the clock. when going round especially a left hand turn at speeds about 100k or more the...


You might try stiffening the rear shocks just a bit. If they're set too soft, they will start to compress and rebound while in the turn. When you're leaning into a turn this compression and rebound translates into what I call a "hobby horse" wobble in that the bike feels like it is not only going side to side but up and down at the same time. Also, with the wide spacing of the front forks, a fork brace would help tremendously. Check your tire pressure as well. Also, check your engine alignment in the frame. It's best to let a dealer or someone who is familiar with the procedure do this. I hope this helps your problem.

Good Luck
Steve

Apr 07, 2011 | 2005 Harley Davidson FXDWG - FXDWGI Dyna...

1 Answer

Factory suspension settings


Spring preload FR
To increase the spring preload and
thereby harden the suspension, turn
the adjusting bolt on each fork leg in direction
a. To decrease the spring preload
and thereby soften the
suspension, turn the adjusting bolt on
each fork leg in direction b
NOTE: _
Align the appropriate groove on the adjusting
mechanism with the top of the
front fork cap bolt.
_
CI-10E
Rebound damping force
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the rebound damping force and
thereby soften the rebound damping,
turn the adjusting screw on each fork
leg in direction b.
CI-02E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
on each fork leg in direction a. To decrease
the compression damping force
and thereby soften the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw on
each fork leg in direction b.
CI-02E
1. Current setting
2. Front fork cap bolt
Setting
Minimum (soft) 8
Standard 6
Maximum (hard) 1
1. Rebound damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 26 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
1. Compression damping force adjusting screw
Minimum (soft) 20 clicks in direction b*
Standard 13 clicks in direction b*
Maximum (hard) 1 click in direction b*
* With the adjusting screw fully turned in direction a
_
Although the total number of clicks of a
damping force adjusting mechanism
may not exactly match the above specifications
due to small differences in
production, the actual number of clicks
always represents the entire adjusting
range. To obtain a precise adjustment,
it would be advisable to check the number
of clicks of each damping force adjusting
mechanism and to modify the
specifications as necessary
CI-10E
Rebound damping force RR
To increase the rebound damping
force and thereby harden the rebound
damping, turn the adjusting screw in direction
a. To decrease the rebound
damping force and thereby soften the
rebound damping, turn the adjusting
screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Compression damping force
To increase the compression damping
force and thereby harden the compression
damping, turn the adjusting screw
in direction a. To decrease the compression
damping force and thereby
soften the compression damping, turn
the adjusting screw in direction b.
CI-14E
Setting
Minimum (soft) 1
Standard 4
Maximum (hard) 9

Whole process where need to turn toward "a" means clockwise and "b" counterclockwise. From Yamaha service manual. Hope this is good enough info to help you out. Good?

May 03, 2010 | 2002 Yamaha YZF-R1

1 Answer

Front forks will not push down at all,how do u adjust softness? and rear is so soft that it bottoms out on jumps,how do u ajust?


wrench or hand turn rear mono shock. Extend the shock for more resistance. Are the front forks air or gas? If they are not pushing down then the rebound is problem bottomed out , air valve on top of forks

Feb 14, 2010 | 2003 Suzuki RM 125

1 Answer

WHAT SHOULD COMPRESSION BE FOR 04 KXF 250


Engine: Four-stroke single cylinder with DOHC, four valves
Displacement: 249cc
Bore x stroke: 77.0 x 53.6
Cooling: Liquid
Carburetion: Keihin FCR37 with hot start circuit
Ignition: Digital AC-CDI
Transmission: Five-speed with wet multi-disc manual clutch
Frame: Perimeter style, high-tensile steel with D-section upper frame rails
Suspension type, front: 48mm inverted, cartridge-type telescopic fork
Suspension adjustments, front: 16-way compression and rebound damping
Suspension type, rear: UNI-TRAK single shock system
Suspension adjustments rear: 16-way compression and rebound damping, spring preload
Wheel travel, front: 11.8 in.
Wheel travel, rear: 12.2 in.
Tire, front: 80/100-21 51M
Tire, rear: 100/90-19 57M
Brakes, front / rear: Single semi-floating 250mm disc, dual-piston / single 240mm disc, single-piston
Compression Ration: 12.6:1 ***********************
Rake/Trail: 26.5 degress/110mm
Overall length: 85.4"
Overall width: 33"
Overall height: 50"
Ground clearance: 13.4"
Seat height: 37.4"
Dry weight: 204 pounds
Wheelbase: 58"
Fuel capacity: 2.0 gal.

Jul 09, 2009 | kawasaki Full Suspension Mountain Bike Men

1 Answer

Kx rear suspension


on the rear shock on the shock its self, the bottom is threaded you will need a spanner wrench to adjust this, but it will make your bike taller, also there is a rebound, and compression screws on the shock you can turn them to the right to adjust this, the front forks have these adjustments also but you will not need the spanner wrench for this.

Jun 20, 2009 | 2006 kawasaki KX 250 F

1 Answer

How do i adjust my rear suspension , i want to make it softer and if i make it too soft how do i make it harder again


Looking the service manual on an 04 shows two seperate adjustment screws.  One for adjusting the rebound dampening and the other for adjusting the compression dampening of your rear shock.  The front has the same set up for each side of the fork.  (2 pistons in front and 1 in back).  If you look at the top of the rear shock on the right side of the bike, you should see an adjustment screw.  That is the compression dampening screw.  You should feel a definate click when you turn the screw to let you know how much you have changed it.  Looking toward the bottom of the shock, you should see a screw labeled RBN.  That is the rebound dampening adjustment.  I would adjust the compression dampening first and then the rebound.  Compression takes care of the initial part of the bump while the rebound slows the shock on the return to neutral.  If the rebound is set to high, you will feel like the bike is trying to toss you off the bike like a bull.  If the compression is too high, you will feel like somebody is kicking you in the arse.  
Hope this helped.  You should be able to find that 04 KX 250 service manual at: http://www.repairmanualclub.com/motomanuals/ I know you have an 06, but I'm sure it's very similar.
Good Luck

Jun 10, 2009 | 2006 kawasaki KX 250 F

1 Answer

Adjust spring preload


There are no preload, compression or rebound adjustments on either end of a 1996 Royal Star. The front fork characteristics can be changed by internal modifications to the front fork piston and a change in fork oil weight (stock is 5W), lengthening the spacers immediately beneath the cap bolt, or addition of progressive springs. The rear shock absorber assembly is a unit with no serviceable parts, no modifications are practical. The only aftermarket suspension parts I've found for the 1996-1998 Royal Stars are kits offered by Hyperpro (ECM), they list kits for the front forks SP-YA13-SSA05 and the rear SP-YA13-SSB05; however, since the rear kit is purported to fit all years from 1996 to the present, and the rear suspension was redesigned for the 2002 model year, I suspect that you may find that the rear kit doesn't work at all.

May 31, 2009 | 1996 Yamaha Royal Star XVZ 1300 A

3 Answers

Yamaha yz250 suspension settings


There is too much involved to include everything, but I can describe to you what everything does.

You have compression dampening which slows the rate at which the shock or forks can compress. Then you have rebound dampening which slows the rate at which the shock or forks can extend.

The compression adjuster on the rear shock is toward the top, sticking out sideways where the resivoir mounts to the side of the shock. The rebound adjuster can be seen below the swing arm on the side of the shock.

The compression adjusters on the front forks can be seen from the top. (its the one in the center, the other is an air bleed) The rebound adjuster is in the center of the lower fork leg, and can be seen from below the fork.



The settings are measured in the number of "clicks" from seated. More clicks from seated will be softer, and less clicks from seated will be stiffer. The best thing to do is to see where you are now and adjusting from there. I like to write them down as I go. Turn the adjuster clockwise untill it stops and take note of the number of clicks. DO NOT FORCE IT! You should also check your service manual and take note of the standard setting, and also take note of the maximum number of clicks you can go from seated. You dont want to screw the adjusters out farther than the max, shock damage can result.

You might try changing to the standard settings and try adjusting from there. If the bike doesnt ride at least moderately decent at the standard settings, your shock and/or forks may need a rebuild.


Generally speaking more compression dampening in the rear will result in less bottoming but a harsher ride. Less would result in the oppisite.

More rebound dampening in the rear will result in too slow of extension and packing up which will make the bike swap in the whoops, but it will not tend to buck you or throw you into a nose dive over a jump. Less would result in the oppisite.

In the front, more compression dampening will be about the same situation as described above with the shock.

More rebound dampening in the front forks can tend to take pressure off of the front wheel in corners causing washout, but too little can make the bike want to loop out over jumps.

Nov 21, 2008 | 2003 Yamaha YZ 250

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