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Haw ohms is kdx ignition coil - 2005 kawasaki KDX 200

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IGNITION COIL TESTING DODGE 2.7 INTREPID 2004


to check ignition coil, you need a digital volt meter put it on the ohms scale check primary resistance across primary coil positive terminal to secondary high voltage terminal. primary resistance should be 0.6 to 0.9 ohms and secondary resistance should be 6 to 9 kilo ohms. if you see zero ohms more likely ignition coil has open circuit.

Aug 26, 2012 | Dodge Cars & Trucks

Tip

How to test a motrcycle twin ignition coil


To test a twin ignition coil on a motorcycle you will need a pocket multimeter.
With the meter set to kilo-ohms(1000 ohms) scale,place one test lead into one spark plug cap & the other test lead into the other plug cap.(this is called the ignition coil secondary resistance) The reading should be around 20-40kilo ohms.
If a high reading exists check again with spark plug caps removed(they un screw from the lead) then check caps seperate. Caps typically read 5 to 10 kilo-ohms.

A faulty plug cap is not as un-common as you might think.

To test ignition coil primary resistance set the meter to ohms(lowest scale) Place one meter test lead to the small wire going into the coil & the other test lead onto the coils body(where its metal) The reading should be only 2 to 5 ohms.

on Jul 15, 2010 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

How do you check an automobile Ignition Coil on a 1973 Datsun 240 Z when the ignition coil is't connected to the automobile electrical system? Can this be done? If so please tell me How!!!!!!! THANK YOU...


    1. To check the coil's primary circuit, perform the following:
    1. Make sure that the ignition switch is turned OFF .
    2. Remove the primary wires from the (+) positive and the (-) negative terminals of the coil.
    3. Using an ohmmeter, set it to the 1.0 ohm range, then connect the probes to the primary terminals. The resistance should be 0.84-1.02 ohm's; if not, replace the ignition coil.

    1. To check the coil's secondary circuit, perform the following:
    1. Make sure that the ignition switch is turned OFF .
    2. Remove the coil wire from the center terminal of the coil.
    3. Using an ohmmeter, set it to the 15,000 ohm range, then connect the one probe to the center terminal and the other to the (-) negative terminal. The resistance should be 8,200-12,400 ohms. If not, replace the ignition coil.
  • Jan 22, 2011 | Datsun 210 Cars & Trucks

    2 Answers

    Got fuel to the throttle body but still wont fire,


    There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

    The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

    That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

    If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

    To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.
    The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.

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    Sep 21, 2010 | 1988 Chevrolet K1500

    2 Answers

    No spark from spark plug wires I think it may be the distributor cap or interior parts under cap like rotor and condensor but dont want to change parts thats are fine i replaced the plugs but still no...


    There wrere two types of HEI (High Energy Ignition) distributors used by GM in 1985, one was the original design with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap, and the second had the coil mounted seperate from the distributor and used a coil wire.

    There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also if the coil is seperate from the distributor that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

    The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

    That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

    If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

    To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

    Let me know if you require any further assistance.


    GM HEI Ignition Coil (Mounted In Distributor Cap Type)
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    Jul 30, 2010 | 1985 Chevrolet Chevy

    1 Answer

    What would cause my car to not send spark to the spark plugs


    The first thing is do you know when the last time was that the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires were changed?

    There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

    The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

    That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

    If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

    To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

    Let me know if you require a firing order diagram any further assistance with testing or diagnostic procedures.




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    Jul 29, 2010 | 1995 Chevrolet Blazer

    1 Answer

    I have an 88 Chevy Cheyenne 4.3 V6 with a throttle body. It is acting like gas is not getting into the jets. I checked the fuel filter, fuses, relays, wiring to the jets, and still can't find the...


    If the fuel pump does run and there is fuel pressure but there is no fuel injector pulse to the fuel injectors at the top of the throttle body, then the problem is either with the distributor, the ECM, or the wiring between the ignition module inside of the distributor and the ECM.

    There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

    The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

    That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

    If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

    To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

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    Jul 13, 2010 | Chevrolet C1500 Cars & Trucks

    1 Answer

    I have a 1981 KDX 175 and was driving and it started sputtering and finally quit and now i can't get any spark at my spark plug any suggestions.


    I've seen a few of those have a problem with the flywheel magnets coming loose.
    When you pull the flywheel off the magnets still look like they are stuck, but they move when corrosion creeps under them
    The resistances off a kx500 should be similar as follows, cant find my kdx manual.
    Stator
    black\red-black\yellow 500ohm
    white\red-white\green 5ohm

    ignition coil
    primary 1ohm
    secondary 6Kohm

    Jun 30, 2010 | kawasaki KDX 200 Motorcycles

    3 Answers

    Where is the ignition coil located?


    For test:
    1. Follow the coil wire from the center terminal on the distributor cap to the end at the ignition coil. Make sure that the transmission is in Park (AT) or Neutral (MT) and that the ignition is turned OFF .
    2. Separate the wiring harness connector from the ignition module at the distributor. Inspect for dirt, corrosion and/or damage. Reconnect the harness if no problems are found.
    3. Attach a 12 volt DC test light between the coil TACH terminal and an engine ground, then crank the engine. If the light flashes or is continuous:
      1. Turn the ignition switch OFF .
      2. Detach the ignition coil connector on top of the coil and inspect for dirt, corrosion and/or damage.
      3. Using an ohmmeter, measure the ignition coil primary resistance from the BATT to the TACH terminals.
      4. The ohmmeter reading should be 0.8-1.6 ohms. If the reading is less than 0.8 ohms or greater than 1.6 ohms, the ignition coil should be replaced.
      5. Using an ohmmeter, measure the ignition coil secondary resistance from the BATT terminal to the high voltage terminal.
      6. The resistance should be 7,700-10,500 ohms. If the resistance is less that 7,700 ohms or greater than 10,500 ohms, replace the ignition coil.
    For Removal:
    1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
    2. Detach the coil electrical connector(s).
    3. Unfasten the retainers, then remove the ignition coil from the vehicle.
    4. Installation is the reverse of the removal procedure.

    Hope helped with this.

    Nov 11, 2009 | 1990 Mercury Cougar

    1 Answer

    I hawe a 2002 fird explorer and wont start will crank and hawe gas in system but no sparks on spark plugs


    Roughly 4 possibilities. First to check would be ignition switch, by determining if power getting to coil when key turned on. Second would be coil. These days you have to take it in, but most part places will check it for free. Third it the control module. Same advice. Forth is the distributer pickup. Same advice again, except put the engine on TDC and mark the pointing of the rotor on the shaft, so that you can put the distributer back in more easily.

    Oct 31, 2009 | 2002 Ford Explorer

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