Question about 2002 Yamaha YZ 426 F

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Harsh and loud popping and backfire on acceleration

Problem goes away if disconnect the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS). Yamaha did a bench resistance test of TPS and said it was OK. Per the manual, Voltage test of TPS (done connected) and voltage out of CDI (done with TPS disconnected) check within specification.
Yamaha states they have never heard of a TPS going bad. Don't want to buy a $270 part that I can't return.
Should I conclude TPS is bad? Can bike be ridden safely without TPS?

Also, 2 mechanics have gone through the carb and it now has all new jets - this did not fix problem. Valve lash adjustment just completed also. Bike starts on 2nd kick so no starting issues.

Thank you.

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As with any electro-mechanical moving part, they have been known to malfunction or ultimately just plain wear out. Besides that, they are often victims of improper service procedures.
These procedures will either result in damage to the sensor, or impair its range of operation. In any event, a malfunctioning, damaged, or misadjusted TPS will cause a variety of driveablility symptoms. The only option is to replace it...
Let me know if you need further assistance

Thanks
K

Posted on Apr 20, 2009

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Yamaha v star 650. With the tps sensor off the carb and not connected to anything. How many ohms should the tps sensor put out?


Hi Daniel the following information is courtesy of Road Star Clinic and written by Steve Graham
  • With the TPS cable disconnected from the bike's harness, you'll see that the wires from the TPS are Blue, Yellow, and Black. Using an Ohmmeter (the digital type is best), measure the resistance between the terminals for the Blue and Black wires. It should be between 4k ~ 6k Ohm at 68-degrees F. Temperature "IS" a factor, so you'll find it will vary some with different temps. Throttle position is NOT a factor in this measurement.
  • Measure the resistance between the Yellow and Black terminals, with the throttle closed. If it does not fall within the desired range, then by loosening the M4 screws holding the TPS to the bracket, you can rotate the TPS until it shows the correct reading on the Ohmmeter. With the right setting established, retighten the screws. So far, I've found that every TPS I've installed has needed a setting of 650 to 675-Ohm. If you measure the resistance between the Yellow and Black terminals while opening the throttle from idle to fully open, you should see a progressive change from the set point to a maximum between 4k ~ 6k-Ohm.
Not all digital ohmmeters are setup the same. Some have a multiplier on the LCD for each scale (X10, X100, X1K, and X10K), but yours may have range limits that just indicate the highest limit of each setting on the dial. With that type of ohmmeter, you'd use the 10-K or 20-K scale (whichever it comes with) while reading the blue & black wires (which just means that 10,000 or 20,000 Ohms is that scale's greatest resolution). The reading taken from the blue & black wires is the maximum resistance of the TPS and isn't effected by throttle position. When you measure the resistance between the blue and black wires you should get something in the neighborhood of 5,000 Ohms (give or take about 500). Multiply that number times the standard of .13 to .15 (I just use .14) and the result is the resistance to set the TPS position to while reading the yellow and black wires. With ohmmeters that have range limits, you'd use the 1K or 2K scale (whichever it has) to set it while connected to the yellow and black wires. The yellow and black wires show the variable resistance of the TPS depending on throttle position and what you're doing is setting the nominal resistances at idle.
Once it's set, if you open the throttle you'll see the resistance across those wires climb between 4,000 to 6,000 Ohms. When you drop the throttle back to idle, it should return to the previously set reading (plus or minus 25 Ohms). It'll vary some, so don't sweat it if it doesn't return to exactly what you set it to.
Good luck and have a nice day.

Aug 19, 2016 | Yamaha Motorcycles

2 Answers

1993. What would cause the car to not accelerate but still remain running?


How to Test the 4.6L, 5.4L Ford Throttle Position Sensor

easyautodiagnostics.com > Ford > 4.6L, 5.4L
Dec 21, 2010 - Testing and troubleshooting the throttle position sensor (TPS) on your Ford ... No power as you accelerate the vehicle. ... Grand Marquis 4.6L,. 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004.

Aug 12, 2015 | Mercury Grand Marquis Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Car starts will not accelerate, code reader says Code DTC 22 Throttle Position Low


Well code 22 means the signal coming from the TPS is too low. That usually means an open circuit between the sensor and the engine computer. The computer sends a 5 volt signal to the sensor and reads what comes back to the computer. Its possible the sensor is way out of adjustment, but more likely a broken wire or connector between the sensor and computer. You would need a scanner to "see" the data stream from the sensor to know for sure.

Aug 06, 2014 | 1992 Chevrolet Camaro

2 Answers

Throttle position sensor


Should be on the left or right side of the throttle body opposite side of where the accelerator cable attaches.The TPS is a reostat (Variable resister) that is turned by the armature running through the throttle body.

Jul 18, 2012 | 2000 Mercury Mountaineer

1 Answer

Where is the thorttleposition sensor on 2001jeep cherokee


The 3 wire Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) is mounted on the throttle body and is connected to the throttle blade.
The TPS is a 3wire variable resistor that provides the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) with an input signal (voltage) that represents the throttle blade position of the throttle body. The sensor is connected to the throttle blade shaft. As the position of the throttle blade changes, the resistance (output voltage) of the TPS changes.
The PCM supplies approximately 5 volts to the TPS. The TPS output voltage (input signal to the PCM) represents the throttle blade position. The PCM receives an input signal voltage from the TPS. This will vary in an approximate range of from .26 volts at minimum throttle opening (idle), to 4.49 volts at wide-open throttle. Along with inputs from other sensors, the PCM uses the TPS input to determine current engine operating conditions. In response to engine operating conditions, the PCM will adjust fuel injector pulse width and ignition timing.
The PCM needs to identify the actions and position of the throttle blade at all times. This information is needed to assist in performing the following calculations:

selectachapter.gif

Cherokee, Grand Cherokee, 1999-2005
Throttle Position Sensor

Print


Operation

The 3 wire Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) is mounted on the throttle body and is connected to the throttle blade.
The TPS is a 3wire variable resistor that provides the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) with an input signal (voltage) that represents the throttle blade position of the throttle body. The sensor is connected to the throttle blade shaft. As the position of the throttle blade changes, the resistance (output voltage) of the TPS changes.
The PCM supplies approximately 5 volts to the TPS. The TPS output voltage (input signal to the PCM) represents the throttle blade position. The PCM receives an input signal voltage from the TPS. This will vary in an approximate range of from .26 volts at minimum throttle opening (idle), to 4.49 volts at wide-open throttle. Along with inputs from other sensors, the PCM uses the TPS input to determine current engine operating conditions. In response to engine operating conditions, the PCM will adjust fuel injector pulse width and ignition timing.
The PCM needs to identify the actions and position of the throttle blade at all times. This information is needed to assist in performing the following calculations:


Ignition timing advance Fuel injection pulse-width Idle (learned value or minimum TPS) Off-idle (0.06 volt) Wide Open Throttle (WOT) open loop (2.608 volts above learned idle voltage) Deceleration fuel lean out Fuel cutoff during cranking at WOT (2.608 volts above learned idle voltage) A/C WOT cutoff (certain automatic transmissions only)


Removal & Installation

3.7L & 4.0L

  1. Disconnect TPS electrical connector.
  2. Remove TPS mounting screws.
  3. Remove TPS.

To Install:
The TPS is mounted to the throttle body. The throttle shaft end of throttle body slides into a socket in the TPS. The TPS must be installed so that it can be rotated a few degrees. (If sensor will not rotate, install sensor with throttle shaft on other side of socket tangs). The TPS will be under slight tension when rotated.
  1. Install TPS and retaining screws.
  2. Tighten screws to 7 Nm (60 inch lbs.) torque.
  3. Connect TPS electrical connector to TPS.
  4. Manually operate throttle (by hand) to check for any TPS binding before starting engine.

4.7L
  1. Remove air duct and air resonator box at throttle body.
  2. Disconnect TPS electrical connector.
  3. Remove two TPS mounting bolts (screws).
  4. Remove TPS from throttle body.

To Install:
The throttle shaft end of throttle body slides into a socket in TPS. The TPS must be installed so that it can be rotated a few degrees. If sensor will not rotate, install sensor with throttle shaft on other side of socket tangs. The TPS will be under slight tension when rotated.
  1. Install TPS and two retaining bolts.
  2. Tighten bolts to 7 Nm (60 inch lbs.) torque.
  3. Manually operate throttle control lever by hand to check for any binding of TPS.
  4. Connect TPS electrical connector to TPS.
  5. Install air duct/air box to throttle body.

Hope this helps

Dec 31, 2011 | 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2 Answers

P1193 error code car wants to stall when stopping and accelerating


P1193 = Detected engine speed below 470 RPM. There are several possible causes/components which can contribute to this drivability issue. ELECTRONIC THROTTLE SYSTEM (ETS). In most cases, an ETS related DTC will set in pairs of codes. The first code denotes the related system or component. The second code is for the specific fault detected.
There was also probably P1191 - limp home

For this issue, on frequent occations I've found the throttle position sensor (TPS) (potentiometer) had bad spots in it and subsequently sending erratice signals to the ETS Control Module (additionally, the throttle body and plate had carbon buildup inteferring with the intake air flow. Also check for air leaks (intake air hoses, vacuum lines & tubes for cracks/leaking). Clean the throttle body & plate. Bench test the TPS. You also have an APS (Accelerator Position Sensor) located on the RH side engine compartment near the firwall next to the strut tower. These are the initial components to check/examine. Replace as needed.


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Aug 31, 2011 | 2001 Hyundai XG300

1 Answer

I have an 2006 lincoln navigator and i had 2 codes p2104 and p2112 i changed #2 spark plug and coil then i got a fail safe mode turned truck off then back on then went away then i got the two codes p2104...


Hi, there is a post here on this issue: http://www.fordf150.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=50060&highlight=p2104

Since you have already changed the TPS, I assume you also cleaned the throttle body? Is the throttle actuating smoothly? If not, make any repairs needed to make it smooth and easy to rotate the throttle.
If the throttle is good, then test the accelerator position sensor per the procedure below.
Please let me know if you have any questions, and thanks for using FixYa.
OperationThe APP sensor is an input to the powertrain control module (PCM) and is used to determine the torque demand. There are 3 pedal position signals in the sensor. Signal 1, APPS1, has a negative slope (increasing angle, decreasing voltage) and signals 2 and 3, APPS2 and APPS3, both have a positive slope (increasing angle, increasing voltage). During normal operation APPS1 is used as the indication of pedal position by the strategy. The 3 pedal position signals make sure the PCM receives a correct input even if 1 signal has a concern. There are 2 reference voltage circuits and 2 signal return circuits for the sensor.
Removal & Installation
  1. Disconnect the battery ground cable.
  2. Disconnect the accelerator pedal position sensor electrical connector.
  3. Remove the 3 bolts and the accelerator pedal assembly.

To install:
  1. Install the 3 bolts and the accelerator pedal assembly.
  2. Tighten the mounting bolts to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm).

Testingjturcotte_1769.gif

Fig. 5.4L APP sensor connector

  1. Checking the VREF voltage to the Accelerator Pedal Sensor

    Turn the ignition switch to the off position. Disconnect the Accelerator Pedal sensor connector. Measure the voltage between pin 6, 7 (ETCREF+) and 1, 3 (ETCRTN-). The voltage should read between 4-6 volts, If not repair circuits in question.
  2. Checking the Functionality of the APP sensor.

    Turn the ignition off. Disconnect the Accelerator Pedal sensor connector. Refer to Resistance Chart:

    jturcotte_1770.gif

    Fig. APP Diagnostic resistance chart

May 27, 2011 | Lincoln Navigator Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 1990 hyundai excel that idles irratic when I first shift into drive in the morning, sometimes stalls when I hit the gas. Problem seems to go away as car warms up. Timmings good, compressions good,...


Without actually inspecting/looking at the vehicle, the problem sounds like it's the Throttle position sensor (TPS). Before buying this component, you need to 'bench-test' it to be sure. The TPS is merely a potentiometer (variable resistor - POT) with center tap and two wiper plates (when the throttle is fully closed, the resistance in TPS A is at maximum and in TPS B is at minimum. When the throttle is wide open (W.O.T. - wide open throttle, the resistances of 'A' and 'B' circuits are opposite each other - A minimum and B maximum). The computer (Engine Control Unit - ECU) uses/monitors these signals to adjust/manage the fuel map (fuel trims). Using an analog Ohm Meter, you can test the TPS (or contact someone who knows how), to check for bad spots (erratic resistance changes) in the POT. If the POT is bad, you'll most probably find the problem where the POT is in/near the "IDLE" position... since that's where you mentioned sometimes 'stalls' when you hit the gas.

Feb 08, 2011 | 1990 Hyundai Excel

1 Answer

2008 Hyundai Tiburon revving to 7500 rpm while stopped at a light. 5 speed tranny


Get ready to replace the TPS (throttle position sensor).

TPS will act up is it wet or

one of more wire(s) are ground to the frame/engine.

Disconnect,clean and reconnect the TPS sensor.
Disconnect the battery for 4 minutes then reconnect.
Let the computer ECU re-learn the value of the resistance reading.


Is you throttle tension OK when it happen.

Lose throttle cable can also cause the same problem.


Jul 18, 2009 | Hyundai Motor 1990 Sonata

1 Answer

Still looking idea on WOT relay. Cuts power to A/C compressor, controlled by PCM


Wide open throttle signal goes to PCM from the TPS, throttle position sensor. mounted on throtle body

eg.
Throttle Position Sensor The throttle position (TP) sensor (Figure 39) is a rotary potentiometer or Hall-effect sensor that provides a signal to the PCM that is linearly proportional to the throttle plate/shaft position. The sensor housing has a three-blade electrical connector that may be gold plated. The gold plating increases corrosion resistance on terminals and increases connector durability. The TP sensor is mounted on the throttle body. As the TP sensor is rotated by the throttle shaft, four operating conditions are determined by the PCM from the TP. Those conditions are closed throttle (includes idle or deceleration), part throttle (includes cruise or moderate acceleration), wide open throttle (includes maximum acceleration or de-choke on crank), and throttle angle rate.

Jul 02, 2009 | Lincoln Town Car Cars & Trucks

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