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Motorcycle carburetor Carburetor is not pumping fuel into the cyclinder

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  • Suzuki Master
  • 8,404 Answers

Carb is not a pump. Carbs depend on suction and pressure to operate. If you are not getting fuel, the fuel pump may not be delivering the fuel to the carb or the carb may not be allowing the fuel in due to a stuck float valve or a dirty jet. I'm leaning toward a dirty jet or bad fuel.

Posted on Jul 26, 2013

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Carburetor

It is located between the Intake Manifold on the engine and the Air Breather, which is under the seat. To remove, turn the fuel shutoff valve to OFF. Remove the fuel supply hose from the carb; it may help to leave it in place on the shutoff valve. Loosen the hose clamps that connect the carb to the Air Breather and the Intake Manifold. On the right side of the bike, you will have to remove the cover and cables for the throttle control. The cover should be held on by two small screws. The cables will come out of their grooves, but you may have to work at that a bit.

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

  • 2712 Answers

SOURCE: Cleaning the carburetor

Once it has been determined that the carbs are the problem it's time to get to it. Some racks of carbs are easier to remove than others. If you're working on a newer model bike the rubber boots from the airbox to the carbs and the manifold boots from the carbs to the motor should be relatively soft and pliable. On older bikes however this is rarely the case. First remove the fuel tank, seat, and side covers. Depending on your model of bike other parts may need to be removed too. For many single cylinder bikes the carb can often be removed without removing any body work at all. The bike below is a 1983 Yamaha XJ750 Seca with 4 inline Hitachi carburetors You'll want to loosen the circle clamps on all of the rubber boots. Sometimes I'll even take them all right off (carefully, without bending them too badly) so that they aren't in the way. Inspect the airbox. On many bikes it is bolted in place to tabs on the frame. Remove those bolts and try to create as much space as possible for the airbox to pull backwards. Next, put the bike on it's centerstand and straddle it facing forward. Put your right hand on the right-most carburetor and your left hand on the left-most carburetor and get ready to sweat. Sometimes you'll be able to pull the carbs straight backwards nice and easy, but that is pretty rare. I usually end up rotating them up then rotating them down as best I can while pulling backwards furiously. This can really take some work and time, especially if you've never done it before. In real extreme cases where you simple can't get the carbs to pull backwards out of the manifold boots I have a couple tips. These tips should only be used in extremely difficult cases when you have been struggling for an hour and simple can't get the carbs to pull backwards out of the manifold boots. Tip 1: Ratchet Straps - This is sort of a last resort, but it has worked without fail for me when I'm pooling sweat on the garage floor and the carbs aren't budging. Wrap a ratchet strap around one of the outer carbs and put the hooks somewhere on the rear of the frame. Then slowly ratchet the carbs right out of the boots. Be careful not to pull them too cockeye'd or you could damage the boots. Attach a second ratchet strap to the other side if necessary. (Note: you can do this in the opposite direction to force carbs back into the boots once they are clean.) Tip 2: Full Pull! - You should do this before you do the ratchet strap method above. Sit down on your butt along one side of the bike. Wedge one of your feet up between the forks and the front fender, then put both hands on the same outermost carb and PULL PULL PULL! This might not work so well if you're short! Ha. Ok, So The Carbs are pulled back Chances are the airbox boots are all crammed up now. Do your best to rotate the carbs up and out from the boots and pull them out one side of the bike. Sometimes it's easier to pull the carbs out one side than the other, so have a look to see if there are frame elements, motor elements, or hoses that may block the carbs from coming out on one side. Also keep note of the throttle cable(s) and choke cable (if there is one). Now may be a good time to loosen the nuts that hold them in place and disconnect them. Struggle just a couple more minutes wriggling the carbs out the side. Ok, You have the carbs off the bike Make sure you brush off any loose dirt or grime, then flip the carbs over and remove the screws from the corners of the carburetor. Some carbs won't have bolts in the corner and instead have a wire latch over top which can just be forced over. Remove the bowls. If the carbs are real gummed up the insides might look like this: It's obvious that these carbs are all clogged up. Some carbs might not look so bad, some might be a lot worse. It's always a mystery what will be inside the bowls. Now it's time to remove the floats. It's generally a good idea to drench everything in carb cleaner (available at any autoparts store). Sometimes the pins will practically fall right out, sometimes they'll be so stubborn you won't think they'll ever come free. But they will! Carefully push on the pin from either side. Sometimes a nail and a gentle tap from a hammer is helpful. **BE CAREFUL**, using force to remove a stuck float pin can break off the pin tower. If they are really stuck and you can't seem to work them free here are a couple tips. Tip 1: Heat - Adding a little flame to the float pin towers can help. **Don't Burn Down Your Garage!!** Tip 2: Pliers - Using pliers to gently clamp the end of the pin and push it through has worked well for me in the past. **Don't break the towers!!** Once the float pin is out you can remove the floats, the float needle, and unscrew the float jet screen. Set everything aside. Next remove the main jet, pilot jet, and idle jet (if there is one). They should come out easily with a flathead screw driver. Set them aside. Next flip the carburetors back over and remove the caps. Underneath the caps is a rubber diaphram with a spring. Sometimes the caps have a tendency to shoot off the top, so be very methodical when removing the screws. Other times the cap tends to stick down until you start to pry at it, then it shoots off, again, just be cautious and don't loose any parts. Next you'll want to gently pull the slides up out of the carburetor body. You can gently pull on the rubber diaphrams, but be very careful not to tear them. If they don't come up easily stick your finger into the carb intake and push the slide up with your finger. You can also gently pry it with a screw driver (gently). If it doesn't want to budge don't force it. Instead finish reading this article and pay attention to the boiling tips further down. Now your carbs should be pretty well emptied out. If the throttle on the bike moved fluidly and smooth there is little reason to do much to the carb bodies themselves. However, if the trottle was real sticky or frozen there are a few things you can do to free it up. Sometimes just drenching all the throttle components on the carbs and letting it soak is enough, other times it is not. I generally try to break racks of carbs apart. It isn't often necessary and can be confusing to put everything back together in the right places. Also, the little rubber connector hoses and o-rings have a tendency to crack or leak if you mess with them. If you can't work the throttle back and forth until its smooth have a look at the boiling tips further down. Keep it Neat Organization pays off. Clean the Main, Idle and Pilot Jets Hold each jet up to the light and see if you can look through it. The idle and/or pilot jets have extremely small holes so make sure you are looking through them straight. If you can see through the jet it isn't clogged. There could be a little gunk built up around the edges so spray them down with carb cleaner and let them sit a bit. If you can't see through the jet it is clogged and needs to be cleaned. Always try the easiest things first. Here's an ordered list of a few things you can do to clean the jet. Blow through it. - Rarely works, but hey, who knows. Compressed air. - Force 100 pounds into it. Works occassionally. Make sure to hold the jet tightly so it doesn't go flying across the garage. You might put the jet back into the carb body to hold it in place for this. Soak it in cleaner. - When I first started cleaning carbs I thought carb cleaner would be the magic answer. It isn't. In fact, I hardly ever use carb cleaner any more, because it simply doesn't do a very good job of anything but removing varnish from the bowl and slide. But try this. Poking it through. - Collect a few different diameters of needle like objects. A wire from a steel bristle brush works well, a bristle from a broom works well, a baby pin, small sewing needle, etc. Very gently try to poke it through the jet. If you are using a metal needle use caution, brass jets can scratch and deform easily. Boiling! - This works better than anything. Toss the jets into a pot of boiling water and let them bounce around for a couple minutes. When you pull them out blow some compressed air through them and you'll most likely be good to go. Some idle jets can be real tricky and never seem like they'll be cleaned out . . . Just keep working at it, I've never met a jet that couldn't be cleaned. Cleaning the Choke and Air Mixture Screw Air mixture screws have a tendency to strip or break. If the carbs were real gummed up you might find that the air screws are stuck. Don't force them, if they don't want to come out, just leave them for now. It is fairly rare that these screws will need to be cleaned because they are above the float level. If you can get them out just wipe them down with carb cleaner and spray some through the jet. Cleaning the Slide and Needle These are easy to clean. Squirt them with a bit of carb cleaner, wd-40, or anything similar, then wipe them down with a rag. Once the varnish is gone they're good to go. Sometimes they get heavy varnish on them which I will scratch off carefully with a piece of plastic. Scratching the slide and needle is a BAD thing, use caution. Cleaning the Carb Bodies Use the same squirt and wipe method noted above. Most of the time the other pressed jets and passages in the carburetors won't be clogged. But if the bike has been sitting a real long time with squirrels in the airbox it is certainly possible. Us a compressor to blow some air into every passage you can see. Listen for the air coming out the other side. If no air compressor is available use a can of WD-40 with a straw attachment. If some of the pressed jets are clogged it can be difficult to open them up. There are a few things you can do. Carb Dip - Most autoparts stores sell carb dip. It comes in a can similar to a paint can and is a VERY harsh cleaning agent. Soak the entire carbs in this dip. This dip can eat at rubber and plastics if they are submerged for too long, so try and remove everything you can from the carb bodies before soaking them. Once you pull them out swish the carbs around in a bucket of water to clean off the excess dip, then hose them down with WD-40 to get rid of the water. Boiling in Water - Not many people do this but it is by far the best way of cleaning carburetors. Dropping the carbs into a pot of boiling water will instantly free up stuck slides, throttle plates, and other frozen parts. It will also loosen the dirt and grime clogging up pressed jets and other passages. Just make sure to dry the carbs thoroughly with compressed air or the sun afterwards. Boiling in Lemon Juice - There is NOTHING BETTER at cleaning carbs than a giant pot of boiling lemon juice. The acidity from the lemons eats through everything; gas varnish, oil build up, dirt, grime, etc. Sometimes I won't even bother doing anything but this - I'll just remove the bowls, remove the caps, then drop everything into the pot and let it sit for 20 minutes (rotate them a few times). The one caveat to doing this is that you'll want to wash the lemon juice off the carbs as soon as you pull them out. So have a bucket of water ready, or a can of WD-40 to hose them down. Also note that the acidity has a tendency to put a dull finish on the aluminum bodies of the carbs. This isn't a problem in most cases, but if you must have everything shiny be prepared to do a little scrubbing and polishing afterwards. It may sound weird, but trust me, I just saved you LOTS of time. (Most dollar stores sell 1/2 gallon jugs of lemon juice, so buying a few gallons will only cost you $6. Plus you can put it back into the bottles afterwards and save it for next time.) Cleaning the Bowls This is pretty straight forward. Use any of the methods above to tranform your varnished bowls. Most carb bowls are simple, just clean them up and they are good to go. But I picked this Hitachi's for photos because they have a jet built into the bowl. You can see the 'fifth' hole along the edge of the bowl, that is actually a thin passage that extends to the bottom of the bowl. This is for the idle jet and is extremely important. If these passages are clogged, the bike won't stay running, period. Use the same poke, soak, and boiling methods outlined elsewhere in this article. Not all bowls have these passages, only some, if your's don't - good for you! Once Everything is Clean Now that everything is clean it's time to put it all back together. Take your time and make sure you put everything back where it came from. WD-40 is your friend. When screwing in the jets don't over do it, they only need to be seated and snug, do NOT use any force putting the carbs back together. If the bowl gaskets got goobered up you can put a little RVT on them. So long as the float needles are still in good condition leaky gaskets shouldn't be an issue. However, prudent carb tinkerers may want to order replacements if necessary. Once the carbs are back together stuff them back into the bike! Extra Notes Rebuild Kits - This guide did not mention rebuild kits until now. Rebuild kits (consisting of new gaskets, jets, needles, etc) can be purchased for nearly any bike, both old and new. 95% of the time these are NOT needed. I have rebuilt enough carbs to block off main street, and only once have I used new parts. ONCE! Carburetor Adjustment - Carburetor adjustment, setup, jetting, and synchronizing is a whole encyclopedia waiting to happen. Those topics are not covered in this article, but I will address them in future articles. Carburetor Polishing - External carb asthetics will be important to some, and not to others. Cleaning is all I am covering here, this will be addressed in the future. Work Space - Make sure you have lots of space to keep organized. I also like to work on a wooden surface because it absorbs the spilled gas and cleaners rather than pooling. That's it! You're Done! I'll continue to write a couple more related articles about diagnosing carburetion issues as well as the proper way to adjust, jet, and tune your carbs.

Posted on Nov 20, 2008

  • 3567 Answers

SOURCE: carburetor settings

For the carb idle screw and the carb air screw, IMPORTANT > do not tighten these two screws down. Only screw these in until they LIGHTLY seat. Now turn each screw one and one half turns outward. Set the engine idle speed from this point.

Pleas rate this answer. Thanks fergie881!

Posted on Apr 14, 2009

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: setting float level on HSC40 Hitachi carburetors on 1986 Virago

I have a 1982 Virago 750 that I just did a carb rebuild to. To set the float levels I built a jig from wood that simulates the position of the carbs when mounted on the bike. This jig clamps into my bench vise. I created a fuel supply using a small funnel and a piece of fuel hose mounted above the level of the carbs.. After that all you need is a short length of transparent fuel hose to attach to the drain on the bottom of the float bowl to provide the visual indication of the float setting. Now you are ready to set up the float levels on your bench. This is way easier than trying to set them up in the bike.

Make sure that the jig is set up so that the carbs sit as level as possible across the pair and that they sit as close to the natural position in the bike in the lengthwise position when the bike is sitting level.

The process of setting up these floats can be very tedious, be patient. It may require that the float bowls be removed multiple times to get it correct (I replaced the philips head machine screws with allen head screws to make this easier). Printed instructions for the procedure look for a certain fuel level setting plus or minus 1mm. This kind of tolerance can be quite difficult to get when the only adjustment you have to work with is to bend the metal tang on the float assembly.


Posted on Jul 09, 2009

emissionwiz
  • 76630 Answers

SOURCE: will 1983 carburetor work on 1982 yamaha vision

yes they are the same.

Posted on Apr 29, 2010

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1981 Yamaha XJ650 engine not getting fuel


Hi, Terry always check the fuel flow first to isolate the problem area otherwise the usual suspects are:
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Carburetor does not let fuel to engine


check the fuel lines and filters for blockages

Remove and check all fuel filters located in the fuel line and in the carburetor.

Replace any and all filters that can not be confirmed good or have not been changed recently.


Inspect the fuel lines for leaks or kinks that might interfere with fuel flow.

Tap the top of the carburetor lightly to free a stuck needle valve or float that may be shutting off fuel to the carburetor float bowl.


Check the fuse marked fuel pump in the fuse box for any electric fuel pump equipped vehicles.


Connect a fuel pressure gauge to the Shrader valve if the vehicle has an electric fuel pump. Turn on the key and monitor the fuel pressure, it should be around 60-psi.


If equipped with a mechanical fuel pump, remove the fuel line to the carburetor and connect a fuel gauge to the fuel pump.

This should yield a low pressure, under 20-psi when the engine is cranked over.


Check the mechanical fuel pump by placing a fuel line into a gas can and attach the other end to the intake of the fuel pump.

Crank the engine and check for fuel at the carburetor.


The engine may start with fuel from a remote source such as a fuel can.

If the pump draws fuel from the can and not the tank the tank screen must be inspected and or replaced.

This would require removing the gas tank.


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7. Vacuum lines to the mechanical fuel pump clogged, cracked, pinched, bent, broken or missing*
8. Faulty electric fuel pump and or wiring*
9. Fuel line from the fuel pump to the carburetor clogged, cracked, pinched, bent, broken, or missing*
10. Carburetor inlet fitting clogged.
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12. Carburetor overflow line clogged, pinched, or bent.
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you will have to take the carburetor off and take it apart use carb cleaner to clean the carb put it back together and it should work

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Check compression of cylinders, all should be close the same. Swap spark plugs and check if problem cylinder moved. If bike sits for long periods of time then most likely it will be a plugged carburetor.

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