Question about 2011 Harley Davidson FLHTCU Ultra Classic Electra Glide

1 Answer

2011 FLHTCU brakes

Rear brake drag's. Have been bleed ,dis-assembled cleaned and re-assembled.On third set of pads

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  • Harley Davidson Master
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Hi Anonymous, you could have rear master cylinder issues, the piston is not returning all the way, or a piston in the caliper is not retracting fully for what ever for what ever reason. Good luck

Posted on Apr 20, 2015

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 2336 Answers

SOURCE: replace rear brake pads

Remove right saddlebag, pull the two caliper mounting bolts and remove the caliper. Do not open bleeder or disconnect line. You will need to push a large screwdriver between the old pads before removing them in order to push the pucks back into the caliper or the new pads will not spread enough to reinstall. Then pull the two smaller bolts from the caliper and the pads will fall out. The pads are different for inside and outside, so pay attention, and remember, after reinstalling, before riding, be sure to pump brake pedal, and it may take a few stops before brakes stop as effectively as before.

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

  • 2336 Answers

SOURCE: Stuck Brake Pad Pins

I suggest pulling the axle out a bit to allow the caliper assy more freedom of movement. Then see if you can get the pins out. If not, you can put something (like a piece of wood) between the pistons and the rotor on the outside and gently pump the pedal to see if that does in fact loosen the pins. But a more fundemental question: is the new floating rotor the EXACT diameter as the OEM (or whatever was on there) rotor? It sounds to me like the rotor is jammed against the pins. If it is the same size, are the new pads the same shape as the old ones (same profile on the metal backing)?

Posted on Nov 20, 2008

  • 69 Answers

SOURCE: How do I change the front and rear brakes on a

Not too hard - Undo the two bolts on the caliper and then seperate the caliper and pull the old ones out. Insert the new ones and put the bolts back in to hold the caliper back together and then install them back on the bike with the two retaining bolts. Use a bit of lock tight (Blue) on the threads. Warning do not let anyone apply pressure on the brakes while you have them off the bike or you will have a mess and/or a problem.

Posted on Jun 21, 2009

  • 149 Answers

SOURCE: how to change brake pads on a 2005 1200 Harley

there is 2 bolts on the caliper take them off and there are pad pins that need to be taken out.. inside the caliper there is a metal clip where the pad sits in.. put them in the same way they came out once you start its pretty self explainatory.. you should not have to blead them

Posted on Aug 30, 2009

wd4ity
  • 4565 Answers

SOURCE: Want to replace rear brake pads 1995 Harley Fat boy

Replacing the pads on your Fat Boy is not difficult but you need to pay close attention to the way things are put together as you take it apart. Particularly the little steel pad retainers and the anti-rattle spring. These parts are made and go together in such a way that it's very hard to describe how they go in.

To remove the pads, take the two caliper retaining bolts out of the disc brake caliper. These are usually Torx head bolts. Once you get the bolts out, the caliper simply slides to the front and off of the pads. You'll need a way to push the piston back into the caliper so it will go down onto the new pads. I usually do this with a large pair of slip joint pliers. Make sure you put a rag or something on your calipers so you don't damage the piston or the paint.

Now, look at the way the pads, the little steel pieces at each end of the pads and the anti-rattle spring are in the caliper support bracket. Remove the old pads and parts and install the new pads and parts in the same way. Make sure you put the fiber face of the pad TOWARDS THE ROTOR. Don't laugh, I've lots of people put them in backwards, especially on the back side of the rotor.

Now, carefully slide the caliper back down over the pads taking care not to knock the pads out of there positions. I put a little Loctite 242 (med. strength blue) on the threads of the caliper retainer bolts and reinstall them. Torque them to about 25 foot pounds.
Check the brake fluid level in the rear master cylinder and slowly "pump" the rear brake pedal until the rear brake feels firm. Wait a few minutes and mash the brake pedal one time to the bottom. If it goes down to lower point and then on the next "pump" is higher, you probably need to bleed air from the system.

Open the bleeder valve on the caliper, press the rear brake pedal to the bottom and hold it there, close the bleed valve, and then release the brake pedal. Continue to do this until all the air is out of the system and the rear brake pedal feels firm on the first time it's depressed. While doing this, never allow the rear brake fluid reserviour to run out of fluid. If it does, you'll have to start all over with the bleeding process. Use only DOT 5 brake fluid. DOT 5 and DOT 3 or 4 are NOT compatible and will not mix. If they are mixed, it will cause you a lot of trouble in the future.

Test the brakes before you ride the bike and then again when you first ride the bike at a very low speed. Failure to do this job properly can cause serious injury or death. Brakes must operate properly. Good Luck!

Posted on Oct 24, 2009

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1 Answer

I replaced the brake pads on the rear of my 1999 Olds Bravada. We didn't bleed the brakes because we didn't feel that we had compromised them. Now the brakes are dragging and it seem


Replace the calipers my friend. Corrosion on the caliper pistons is holding the brakes on causing the drag. That rubber boot over the piston doesn't seal from condensation and makes surface rust/corrosion and won't allow the pistons to release all pressure.

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Hi Anonymous, I read some where Harley had an issue with some master cylinder rubber components, put a new rebuild kit in master cylinder, also brake lines inner liners have been known to collapse. Good luck

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Hey Stan the man,need your vehicles info.,year,make,model and engine size and Tommy on the spot here will send you a picture diagram of your rear brake assembly.There's a special spring tool you can get at auto parts store to remove and install springs,me got one.

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Yes.....and no. Emergency brake should have been checked during brake pad replacement.
Most do adjust to new pads...ie: return to factory adjustment setting due to new pads .

The E brake lever should be applying braking to the wheels after three clicks are heard during application of the Emergency brake.

Lift rear of car and apply emergency brake to the third click. Now both rear wheels should drag equally but not be locked up.
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However, late model cars need a scanner to pull back the pistons and install pads.

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1 Answer

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There could be a couple reasons for this. First thing to check is your return spring, is it still there and attached properly? Next thing to check is your master cylinder pressure release. Loosen the bleed nipple on the rear caliper. Does the brake release now? If so, your master cylinder has some debris clogging the fluid return passageway. Remove and clean it. If the brake still does not release after opening the bleed nipple, at least one of your caliper pistons is binding. Remove the rear caliper and the brake pads. Now press the pedal and force the pistons out. Looses the bleed nipple and attempt to press the pistons back into place. They should move smoothly when you apply firm pressure. Clean the caliper thoroughly. If you have a rebuild kit for the caliper this is a good time to rebuild it. After cleaning, put it back together, bleed the brakes and test again. It is normal for disk brakes to drag SLIGHTLY on the rotor, but they should not stop a free spinning wheel in less than a coupld revolutions when spun by hand.

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crawl underneath the front and look at the caliper if it has a duel piston caliper you will see 2 circles about 3 inches across and if it is a single piston caliper it will only have one of these circles in the middle this iswhere the pistons are. yes those pads are suitable. As for bleeding the brakes you need to start at the passengers side rear wheel and bleed it first then go to the drivers side rear wheel then go to the passengers side front wheel and then finally the drivers side front wheel. If you are only replacing the brake pads and shoes then you don't need to bleed the brakes. If you are bleeding the brakes then you will want to be sure to top up the brake fluid as you are doing thebleeding process as if you don't you will end up having to start all over again. as for special tools you may need a 3/8 hex bit and a 8 inch " C " clamp to compress the calipers after you remove the brake pads. If you are replacing the rotors you may require a special socket fo dis-assebleing and re-assembly of the front hubs.

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