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Hubby has a Diamo 2005 250cc but having trouble with getting it to start. Has replaced CBI,stator,and pick-up coil. Has good battery(that he knows of),new spark-plugs,good gas, good oil, clean carbur

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  • lilpeanutb
    lilpeanutb Jul 13, 2013

    Battery is good. He had it checked by 2 different places.

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  • Contributor
  • 20 Answers

Its an electrical part that when warm malfunctions. id start with coil.

Posted on Jul 14, 2013

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 3567 Answers

SOURCE: my keeway wont start

Check the fuses. Is the kill switch on or shorting out? Disconnect it and then check for spark. Sidestand/centerstand should be up, Got a good battery?

I am unfamiliar with your Keeway and just trying to help. Don't give me a bad rating if I miss the mark on this one. Thanks.

Posted on Apr 01, 2009

  • 89 Answers

SOURCE: Won't Start

do you have compression? for a engine to run you need clean air,compression, good fuel(make sure the fuel has not been there 3 months or more as it will deteriate) and good spark as well as good exhaust as this will cause a back fire if the exhaust valves are not set right.

Posted on Apr 21, 2009

  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: 2001 Yamaha Banshee that won't stay running

If your jetting is too rich it will be extremely hard to kick start it and will most likely flood it from kicking.First thing i would do is pull the top of the carbs off (cable,slides and needles) and see which clip they're set at. If they are set stock which would be middle clip then lower the needle one clip. This will lean the mix out and should start up easier with no problems,The idle issue is most likely just off.If your fiance still has the TORS on it then on top of the carbs he will see 2 dime size and screws and wires as soon as he takes his seat off.While running he can turn each dime size screw in or out to adjust the idle. If it has a TORS elimator kit on it then he won't have all the junk on top of the carbs and it will be just a cable and round cap screwed directly on top of the carbs and the idle screws will be on the side of each carb (brass color screws with nuts to tighten) same thing...in or out to adjust the idle where needed.Hope this helps.

-Steve

Posted on Jun 08, 2009

SOURCE: My Honda crf250r has trouble starting.

you better check for valve clearance.....and to be honest you're intake valve maybe to tight and kept open.....you will reajust it but this will last a ride or two...because maybe the mobdelium coating is done on the intake valve and it is getting tight all the time and kept open....put two new oem valve from honda and you will be back on the track....sometimes i also never rectify any angle on the seat of the valve, just put new one and go.....honda as getting better since 2007....more good quality of coating on the valve....if you bought new valve for an older model they will come with that upgraded and last longer.

Posted on Sep 24, 2009

Benimur
  • 6966 Answers

SOURCE: NO SPARK ON A 98 RM 125

Hi and welcome to FixYa,

Initially, test for the presence / absence of below described voltages using an analog / needle type voltmeter when starting the bike:

  • pulsating low AC voltage coming from the pickup coil;
  • pulsating voltage feeding the ignition coil.

Good luck and thank you for asking FixYa.

Posted on Dec 19, 2009

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1 Answer

Coils 2 and 3 are not firing?


looks like a lot of problems
start at battery a fuse if any to ignition pick up
to ignition module if fitted to coils

stator and regulator are just a plug in
when possible check the battery is now charging at correct volts /amps

Jun 14, 2016 | 2002 Suzuki GSX-R 600

1 Answer

Diamo 200cc no fire


Hi, Corey and the usual suspects are:
1. Fouled spark plugs.
2. Discharged battery, check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check the battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
3. Loose connection at ignition coil or plug between ignition sensor and module.
4. Spark plug cables in bad condition, shorting / leaking, spark plug cable connections loose.
5. Faulty ignition coil or ignition / electronic module
6. Failed CKP, CMP, or BAS sensor.
7. Faulty ignition switch.
8. Security alarm failing to disarm needs reset
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please visit the websites below. Good luck and have a nice day.
What to do When Your Motorcycle Won Start
troubleshoot motorcycle not starting
http://www.carlsalter.com/diamo-service-manuals.asp Scooter Parts for Chinese Scooters Atvs
Chinese ATV Owners Repair Manuals

Apr 29, 2012 | 2009 Diamo LS 200

2 Answers

Got fuel to the throttle body but still wont fire,


There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.
The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.

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Sep 21, 2010 | 1988 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

89 k1500 towed, now fuel injectors dont fire. read all wired to and from ecm, check good. ecm will start another truck.


Check the ECM fuse and then check for any loose wire connectors, especially at the fire-wall area, the ignition coil, and the distributor. Then check for battery voltage at the positive side of the ignition coil when the ignition key is in the "On" or "Run" position, and there should also be battery voltage running over from a wire that is also connected to the positive side of the ignition coil, and then that wire will run over from the ignition coil to the ignition module inside of the distributor, and if there is battery voltage there at the ignition module, then either the ignition module or the pick-up coil inside of the distributor will be the most likely suspects for the cause of the problem.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is actually what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like it could also be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.


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Sep 18, 2010 | 1989 Chevrolet K1500

2 Answers

No spark from spark plug wires I think it may be the distributor cap or interior parts under cap like rotor and condensor but dont want to change parts thats are fine i replaced the plugs but still no...


There wrere two types of HEI (High Energy Ignition) distributors used by GM in 1985, one was the original design with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap, and the second had the coil mounted seperate from the distributor and used a coil wire.

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also if the coil is seperate from the distributor that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require any further assistance.


GM HEI Ignition Coil (Mounted In Distributor Cap Type)
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Jul 30, 2010 | 1985 Chevrolet Chevy

1 Answer

1979 chevy van not getting spark.was running fine day before.turns over fine,getting fuel.could it be the module


First thing is what condition are the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires in?

There is the possibility that the ignition coil located in the top of the distributor cap is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Bat" or "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position. Then check the secondary resistance to the ignition coil.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil. A faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require any further assistance.


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Jul 29, 2010 | 1979 Chevrolet C/K 3500

1 Answer

What would cause my car to not send spark to the spark plugs


The first thing is do you know when the last time was that the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires were changed?

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require a firing order diagram any further assistance with testing or diagnostic procedures.




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Jul 29, 2010 | 1995 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

1991 Caprice Classic.Fuel pump works but does not activate when the car is started with the key. Also no spark. Any ideas?


The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one or all of these systems to malfunction.

There is also the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor and ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition coil to the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.


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Jul 15, 2010 | Chevrolet Caprice Classic Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

How hard is it to install pickup coil in the distributor of a 2001 dodge ram 1500 pickup.


The pick-up coil/stator is easily replaced in a dodge distributor, and once you have removed the distributor cap and the ignition rotor, then just dis-connect the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and lift it straight up and out of the distributor, and the distributor does not have to be removed or dis-assembled to replace the pick-up coil/stator. There are two alignment tabs on the pick-up coil/stator that will match up with the distributor cap when the pick-up coil/stator is properly installed. Here are two images to help assist you.


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Jun 29, 2010 | Dodge Ram Pickup 1500 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I just changed fuel pump on this car . I drove it for twenty mile now it want start it will try but it want remain running . I changed fuel pump relay It didnt appear to help . Do you think it could be in...


That is a very good possibility and I would certainly suspect it to be the problem. Also, remove the distributor cap and look at the connector to the ignition module from the pick-up coil/stator and it should be white like it is shown in the image here of the pick-up coil/stator, and if it is dark in color or burnt looking then also replace the pick-up coil/stator or the distributor.

Pick-up Coil/Stator


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Jun 12, 2010 | 1991 Mercury Topaz 4 Door

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