Question about 2002 kawasaki KLX 650 R

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Drive chain rubbing on frame klx650 - 2002 kawasaki KLX 650 R

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Can you adjust the chain to not do this. move the tire backwards to adjust for this.

Posted on Feb 17, 2009

  • Jeff Workman
    Jeff Workman Mar 03, 2009

    i meant can you adjust chain by moving rear tire backwards.

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Drive shaft rubs against the sub frame


Year make and model? If you have a front wheel drive? you have a serious frame and mount problem. My guess would be the frame is rusted away. Probably should not be driving this car.

Apr 22, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

Tip

Drive Hub, Spring Pulley & Chain Replacement for Steppers


Video about the Drive Hub Replacement Procedure for Stairmaster Steppers

  • This videocovers replacing the spring pulley, the step chain and the drive hub assembly on the Stairmaster steppers
  • Tools needed:
    • Snap Ring Pliers
    • Tip Kit for Snap Ring Pliers
    • Socket Wrench
    • 7/16" Socket
    • 7/16" Wrench
    • Needle Nose or Standard Pliers
    • Safety Goggles
  • Begin by disconnecting the spring
  • Do this by pulling up on the spring and unhooking the spring from the frame post
  • Next, using the snap ring pliers and proper tips, remove the snap ring from the spring pulley shaft
    **Important: Be sure to wear safety goggles when working with snap rings**
  • Remove and inspect the spring pulley for any flat spots replacing the pulley if necessary
    • Flat spots develop over time and can result in roughness in the pedals
  • On the side that the pulley was just removed, slowly press the pedal down
  • Remove the step chain retainer brackets (if equipped) using the 7/16" wrench, 7/16" socket and socket wrench
  • Once the retainer bracket is removed, the spring can be lifted up over the drive sprocket and disconnected from the chain
    • The spring is opened at one end to allow for maneuvering over the link
  • Using the standard or needle nose pliers, remove the master link attaching the step chain to the pedal arm
    • Place one jaw of the pliers against the open end of the clip (if installed correctly, the open end of the clip is opposite the direction of chain travel) and the other jaw of the pliers against the far side of the nearest rivet coming through the keeper link; and squeeze pliers together
    • This should pop the clip free allowing you to remove it from the master link
    • Next remove the link bar
    • Finally remove the master link disconnecting the chain from the pedal arm
  • Inspect the new step chain making sure all the chain links flex
    • Manufacturer recommends lubricating the step chain with 30W motor oil using a clean rag to remove any excess
  • Attach the new step chain to the pedal arm reversing the steps taken to disconnect the chain
  • Relieve tension on the opposite spring by lifting up on the spring and unhooking it from the frame post
  • Slowly press the pedal down
  • Feed the spring around the pulley and lift the chain up over the sprocket to move it out of the way
  • Disconnect the remaining two bolts from the drive hub assembly
  • Lift the drive chain over the sprocket and pull the drive hub from the frame
    • As the drive hub assembly starts to develop problems, you may feel clicking, hear some grinding sounds, or a pedal may stick in one position (which usually happens on one side); All of which are indicators of a worn drive hub assembly
    • The drive hub can be replaced as a complete unit
      • The drive hub consists of (3) sprockets
        • Two one way clutch sprockets that drive in one direction and slip in the opposite direction which are for the step chains
        • A larger sprocket that spins either direction and is for the drive chain
    • An inspection of the drive hub can help determine need for replacement
          • If either of the one way clutch sprockets slip in both directions, they need replaced
          • If there is a catch in any of the sprockets in any position, then it likely needs replaced
  • Reinstall the drive hub the same way it was removed
  • Slip the drive chain over the drive sprocket before mounting the hub assembly to the frame
    • The drive hub assembly on the SC916 stepper only has 4 bolt positions. The drive hub assembly on the 4400 and 4600 steppers has bolt holes all around the hub allowing the hub to be rotated for chain tension adjustment. The SC916 stepper has a preset tension and the adjustment is no longer necessary
  • Once the drive hub is bolted to the frame, reinstall the step chains on each side
  • Place the free end of the step chain (opposite the pedal arm connection) up over the step chain sprocket
  • Lift up on the pedal and pull down on the step chain
  • Place a hand on the sprocket keeping the step chain from feeding back and allowing the pedal to drop
  • Grab the spring with your opposite hand and join the spring to the step chain
  • Once the spring is attached to the chain, press the pedal down again
  • Reinstall the spring pulley and the snap ring onto the pulley shaft
  • Lift up on the pedal and pull the spring to route through the pulley, hooking the spring onto its frame post
  • Repeat these steps to attach the step chain and spring on the opposite side
  • Reinstall the step chain brackets (if equipped) making sure all bolts face the same direction
  • This concludes the video demonstration of replacing the drive hub, spring pulley and chains on the Stairmaster steppers

Spring Pulley Chain Drive Hub Replacement Video for Stairmaster Stepper...

on Feb 25, 2015 | Stairmaster Exercise & Fitness

Tip

Drive Hub Assembly Replacement for Stairmaster 4000PT Stepper


Stairmaster Stepper Drive Hub Assembly Replacement
  1. Remove the side covers.
  2. Remove the step chain retainers.
  3. Supposrt the pedal arm. Unhook the pedal arm return spring from the spring hanger. Lift the step chain up and off the clutch sprocket and lower the pedal arm to the floor. Repeat on the other side.
  4. Remove the snap ring from the left end of the drive shaft. WARNING: To reduce the risk of eye injury, wear eye protection when removing snap rings.
  5. Remove the drive chain.
  6. Remove the sprocket and other small parts from the left side of the hub assembly.
  7. Slide the drive shaft to the right, out of the hub assembly. If you remove the right-hand clutch sprocket form the drive shaft, do not confuse it with the left-hand clutch sprocket.
  8. Loosen and remove the two remaining bolts and nuts that hold the hub assembly to the frame. Remove the hub assembly.
  9. Inspect the drive shaft, bushings, thrust washers, and clutch sprockets for excessive wear or pitting. Replace any worn components.
  10. To reinstall the hub assembly, carefull reverse the disassembly procedures. Be sure that the right- and left-hand clutch sprockets are positioned correctly; the wide shoulder of the sprocket should be facing away from the hub on both sides.
  11. Chain Tension. The drive shaft is mounted in an eccentric hub. Rotate the hub so the marked hole is in the 12 o'clock posistion, lining up four holes in th hub with the four holes in the frame. Use this hub position when reinstalling the drive chain since the distance between the drive and the transmission shafts is at a minimum. The hub is in the proper position when the drive chain has a total of 1" to 1-1/2" of play, up and down, at the slackest point in the chain. If it is necessary to increase the tension or tighten the chain, rotate the hub counter clockwise until the chain has proper tension.
  12. Reinstall the covers.

How to Repalce the Drive Hub Assembly on Stairmaster 4000PT

on Feb 25, 2015 | Stairmaster 4000PT Stepper

1 Answer

Why do i have a slight rubbing/ticking noise from very low speed coasting on my bike?


lots of reasons .......could be chain rubbing on chain guide if it has a chain,or may be worn out chain,.........could be tire rubbing ....check and make sure both tires are evenly spaced between forks and swing arm.....if it has a chain guard make sure chain is not rubbing on guard....Best way to check is to put it on it's double kick stand and start the bike put it in gear and let the tire spin at idle and listen and look for the problem.

Jul 16, 2014 | 2007 Suzuki Bandit 1250

1 Answer

Huffy boys bike makes clicking noise


does it make the "clicking" noise when coasting, pedaling or both? If it is only when pedaling, check to make sure the cranks are not rubbing on a chain guard or hitting the frame, if not then the chain is probably too tight and it is the gear cog teeth meshing with the tight chain. Loosen the rear axle nuts and slide the rear wheel forward slightly, this should take care of it. If the noise happens while coasting then one of the wheels could be rubbing on the frame intermittently, or the hub bearings could be too tight (also making it difficult for small legs to pedal) and the bearings are crushed and flattening making the "clicking" noise as they are being ground up.

Apr 21, 2014 | Huffy Pro Thunder Boys 16-Inch BMX Bike

1 Answer

Seems to petal to hard ??


Easy answer? Check you tire inflation.

More complex? It could be a number of things starting with your chain too tight. Have someone hold the back of the bike up and turn the crank to see if it turns easy. Take note of the chain; at some point when turning slowly you should see it/feel it loosen. If it seems really tight undo your rear axle bolts and adjust the chain so it has about a quarter inch of slack. Make sure that the wheel is centered before you tighten the bolts back down.

This also could be a problem: the back wheel wasn't secure and it is rubbing on the frame. Center the tire between the frame and tighten the bolts.

If all that is OK then it could be bad or over tight bearings.Then it is really bike shop time.

Mar 19, 2013 | Huffy 26 in. Cranbrook Cruiser Bike

1 Answer

ST724 drive chain repair


chech to see that the chain has not stretched too much

Jan 25, 2012 | Garden

1 Answer

Chain keeps falling off


flip bike upside down losen back tire and pull it away from the frame (the chain will visualy get tighter) hold wheel in disired place while tightening up the nuts (side note: make sure the wheel isn't sitting crooked so that it doesnt rub on the frame or the brakes) also brake pads are ajustable to go forward and back

Apr 01, 2011 | Del Sol Shoreliner 3i

1 Answer

Bought my son a Mongoose Rebel at walmart, but when pedalling, it feels like the crank is skipping forward. how do I correct this?


Until you resolve this please don't let your son ride the bike.

Do you mean skipping as in the chain is advancing over the cog or chainwheel teeth? It sounds like you don't have sufficient tension on the chain. After loosening the rear axle nuts, pull the wheel evenly back to make the chain snug but not tight, then tighten the nuts and make sure the wheel is straight, centered and not rubbing the frame.

Jan 17, 2011 | Cycling

1 Answer

The bike makes a loud, rubbing noise. Any ideas?


The most common problem that causes a loud rubbing sound is a tire, usually the back tire, rubbing on the frame, and you can usually see exactly where it is rubbing. Brakes can rub too, but they usually are not that loud, so let's assume it is the tire. This happens when the rear axle wasn't tight enough, and when you pedal hard or hit a pothole, it can make the axle pivot in the slots it fits in, and this lets the tire to rub on the frame, usually on the front part of the rear tire.
Solution: For this kind of work, I usually flip the bike upside down on an old piece of carpet, etc. so it is sitting on the seat and handlebars with the front wheel pointing straight ahead. There are two common methods to secure the axle:
1. Two pretty good sized nuts, one on each side. Find a wrench that fits just right. I prefer a socket, box end or open end wrench, one for each side. On metric nuts, it will often be 14mm or 15mm, sometimes bigger. American sizes are usually in the 9/16 - 5/8 - 11/16" range. I strongly discourage you from using any kind of pliers or even an adjustable (crescent) wrench. You have to tighten these babies pretty tight, and you can easily burr the corners off your nuts with adjustable tools, believe me I've done it. The tricky part is you have to do three things at once. First, you have to keep the front part of the tire evenly spaced between the two sides of the frame. Next, you have to slide both sides of the axle back in their slots until the chain has the proper tension. If you have a ten-speed style bike, the derailler mechanism will adjust the tension automatically for you, so slide the axle all the way back until the side with the gears is against the back of its slot, and let the other side move forward or back as needed for the tire to be centered between the frame. Finally, while you are keeping things lined up - a patient friend who is willing to help makes this much easier, just have them hold the tire so it is evenly spaced between the frame, and then you have to tighten the nuts. If you don't have a ten-speed style gear changer on the back tire, you have to take up most of the slack in the chain yourself and hold it tight until you get those nuts tight enough to keep the axle from slipping. Don't be surprised if you have to loosen up the nuts and do it again - on a single speed bike you should have about 1/4" to 1/2" of flex in the middle of the chain, halfway between the front and rear sprockets. Too tight, and it can wear out your bearings or chain well before their time. Too loose, and your chain will fall off at the worst possible moment, and you will have to do this process all over again, after you push your bike back home. Tighten a little on each side until things get snug, and if the tire is still centered between the frame, do both sides again, harder now (grunt a little this time, it helps) and you should be good to go. Remember, you are not trying to strip the axle threads, or break anything, but you do have to get it tight enough so it won't slip on you again.
2. Oh, yeah, there is another common method you find pretty often on ten-speed style bikes, the quick release.
91177b4.jpg This is an assembly that consists of a lever built onto the axle nut, and the lever is only on one side. You don't use a wrench on the quick release, but they are a little tricky until you understand how they work. As you pull the lever away from the frame, a cam inside loosens the axle, and as you push the lever toward the frame, it tightens. When the lever is in the loose position, you can also spin the nut on the axle tighter or looser (careful, it doesn't take much, and clockwise should be tighter on most bikes). Tightening or loosening the nut part does most of travel, and the lever does the last little bit. The lever is short, usually only 2-3 inches, so if you don't have to push pretty hard on the lever, the nut is probably too loose, and you need to loosen the lever and rotate the nut part clockwise a little bit, until it feels like the axle is getting really good and tight just about the time the lever gets close to the frame. This can also take 2-3 tries of loosening the lever, tightening or loosening the nut, and retightening the lever again, until it feels good and tight, and of course, you have to check your tire alignment one more time to make sure it is still nicely centered between the frame of the bike. Turn the wheel by hand a few turns to make sure it doesn't rub on the frame. If everything is tight, and your tire is still centered, you're ready for a test ride. Just up and down the driveway to start with, and make sure your brakes are okay. Then you can go a little farther, and pedal a little harder. Hopefully the axle will be nice and solid, and you can say, "Good Job! I fixed it myself, on Fixya!"

May 09, 2010 | Cycling

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