Question about 2003 Harley Davidson FLSTF Fat boy

1 Answer

Sounds like low battery when starter first engages

& noticed a broken wire coming from starter relay that is mounted to rear guard under battery in my 1993 flstf, also when I EARTH out that broken wire that comes from the relay the starter kicks without ignition being on.Can't tell where it's sposed to be connected to as there is limited space to poke around. where can I possibly get a wiring diagram ? Thanks Lorie Melboune Austrslia

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Top Expert:

    An expert who has finished #1 on the weekly Top 10 Fixya Experts Leaderboard.

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

  • Harley Davidson Master
  • 31,167 Answers

Hi Lzamparutti, for a free wiring diagram please visit the website below and good luck.
Harley Davidson Wiring Diagrams and Schematics

Posted on Jun 18, 2015

6 Suggested Answers

goalie39
  • 469 Answers

SOURCE: Bike won't start/clicking coming from starter relay

Have you tried charging the battery or jumpstarting it with another battery?

Posted on Apr 13, 2009

Mitchy123
  • 216 Answers

SOURCE: weak ignition spark and start ing problem

try replacing the battery with a big boar 350

Posted on Oct 22, 2009

wd4ity
  • 4565 Answers

SOURCE: bike wont start replace start solenoid.when

You didn't mention what year model your bike is so I'll just generalize my response. Since you said that you replaced the solenoid, I'll assume that your bike is a 1988 model or earlier.

Your bike has a starter relay if it still has the stock wiring on it. Harley has used a starter relay since 1965 on the first model of ElectraGlide. Usually, it's underneath the battery tray or the seat or around that area.

On the back of your solenoid, you have three wire connections. Two very large connectors and one small connector. Make sure your bike is out of gear (in neutral) and use an old screwdriver to short between the large connector that comes from the battery and the small wire connection. The starter should engage and try to start the engine. If the ignition switch is on, it will start the engine. The starter will turn using this method with or without the switch being in the "on" position. If the starter works using this method, the problem is in either the relay or the neutral switch. If the starter does not turn the engine over, the problem is in the solenoid.

Now, let's check a few things. The small connector on the back of the solenoid should have a green or pink (depending on year) wire on it. Using a voltmeter or a test light, make sure you have voltage at the connector when you press the starter button with the switch in the "ON' position. If not, follow the wire to it's source, the relay.

The starter relay can be one of several different designs used throughout the years. It could be a small plastic cube, a small metal can, or a round phonelic relay. The relay should have four connections on it. A "hot" wire, a wire from the handlebar switch, the wire going to the starter, and a ground. The ground may be through the case itself. On the older Shovelhead bikes (1984 and earlier) there was a small short black wire that ran from the starter relay to the transmission for the ground. This wire must be intact or the relay would not work due to lack of a ground.

When you turn the switch on, one of the wires to the starter relay should become "hot". When you press the start button, you should hear a slight click and another of the smaller wires should now be "hot" as well, the one going to the starter.

On some year (1972 and later) models, the neutral switch was wired in with the starter relay. This was to prevent the bike from starting while "in gear" by disabling the relay. You'll have to figure this one out for yourself since I don't know what year model your bike is.

Now, you said you had power to the solenoid when you pushed the starter switch. So, let's assume that the starter failed the first test to told you aboue. If so, the problem is still most likely in the solenoid. Inside the solenoid, there is a large plunger with a copper disc on it. When you depress the starter switch, the coil in the solenoid becomes magnetized and pulls the plunger towards the back of the solenoid. This does two things, it engages the starter drive with the ring gear on the outer clutch drum and makes a high current electrical connection. The copper disc makes contact between the two large connections on the back of the solenoid from the inside. This connects the battery to the starter motor through the solenoid. If the black phonelic plate on the back of the solenoid is cracked or the contacts inside of it are badly burned, it will not work.

Now, if the solenoid is working correctly and you are getting voltage to your starter, it could be the brushes or something inside the starter. This is indicated if the starter trys to turn the engine over but just can't. It won't have enough power if the starter field windings are bad.

I hope I've given you something here that will help you solve your problem. This is basically the electrical part of the starter system. There are mechanical parts as well. If you hear the starter turning but the engine doesn't turn over, you have a mechanical problem. You can either repost or you can contact me directly at wd4ity@bellsouth.net I'll help if I can. Good Luck!

Posted on Nov 05, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: need bacic wiring diagram ignition starter relays

i have a 2000 road king classic, last week i laid it down and the bike blew a couple of fuses, replaced them and the bike started, but i do not have any speedo lights and odometer, no power to the guage, also no blinkers, they light up but does not flash, also the right hand grip was rolled down, could this be the problem ?.

needing help

steven

Posted on Nov 10, 2009

wd4ity
  • 4565 Answers

SOURCE: I need a wiring diagram for a electronic ignition module.

If I understand correctly, Your bike has points in it now and you want to go to electronic ignition. If that's what you want to do, I would suggest that you go with one of the aftermarket ignition units. They're more versatile, costs less, and easier to install.

There are two types available. Your bike has a mechanical timing advance unit behind the points breaker plate. One type of electronic unit eliminates this mechanical part and makes the system truly maintenance free while the other type retains the mechanical advance unit and cost less. A prime example is Crane Cam's HI-1 unit that retains the mechanical advance and their HI-4 unit that eliminates it. Most bikes made after 1984 do not have the mechanical advance units. Since your bike does not have any of the original components left on it, I would suggest that you get one of the units that goes in the "nose cone" of the engine. It simply replaces the everything in there if you get the unit that does not use the mechanical advance. The Mechanical advance units are prone to wear and since no one ever services them, I'd suggest getting rid of it. You'll have to purchase a "timing cup" from Harley, costs about $20, a lot less than $100 bucks for needle bearing mechanical advance unit. Get the shorter screw that goes with it as well.

All you have to have with either unit is a "hot" wire going to the coil. The coil must have a primary resistance of somewhere around 3-4 ohms where a points type coil has a primary resistance of 4-6 ohms. To determine the resistance of your coil use a Digital Volt Ohm Meter and measure the resistance between the two small terminals on the coil. To wire the ignition units is usually just a two or three wire hookup that is very simple. They all come with wiring instructions.

Now, the next thing is whether you wish to stick with "dual fire" ignition or go to "single fire" ignition. Dual fire is the system that almost all Harley's come equipped with from the factory. In this type of system, both spark plugs fire when the pistons are top dead center. Since one piston is on the exhaust stroke, that spark is of no consequence and therefore is considered a 'wasted spark". In a "single fire" system, the spark plugs fire independently when each piston comes to TDC on the compression stroke. It requires either two coils or a "two in one" type coil. This added coil increases the cost of the system and to be honest with you, I cannot tell a difference between the two systems. With that in mind, I opt to go with the less expensive and simplier "dual fire" system.

http://www.cranecams.com/?show=browseParts&lvl=2&prt=4
http://www.compufire.com/harley-main.html
http://www.dynaonline.com/skins/harley_davidson_category.aspx

Custom Chrome online catalog. http://www.customchrome.net//icatalog/full.aspx?Page=571

Ok, this will get you started. Installing an electronic ignition system in an older Harley is easy to do. The difficult part is deciding which one to go with. Once you do that, no problem. If you have anymore questions, drop me a line at wd4ity@bellsouth.net .

To see how to hook up one of the units, go to their website and look for a "Technical" page. Go to that page and look for "installation Instructions". Print them out and it'll tell you everything you need to know. If not, I've got some different types of systems installation instructions that I can scan and send to you.

Good Luck
Steve

Posted on Jul 04, 2010

wd4ity
  • 4565 Answers

SOURCE: I have a 1979 harley

The original wires, one blue and one white, were with the points ignition. The white wire should be the "Hot" wire. Now, look at your wiring diagram. The two white wires should go together to one side of the coil and the blue to the other. There is no positive or negative side of the coil, just two small primary winding terminals. Make sure the white wire from the ignition system is the "hot" or power wire for 12 volts. If you connect the ignition unit up backwards, it will damage it. To make sure the white wire on the bike is the hot wire, simply turn the ignition switch on and check this wire with a test light or volt meter. It should show battery voltage on it. That should be your setup, two white wires on one end of the coil and a blue wire on the other.

Good Luck
Steve

Posted on Nov 16, 2010

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

HEAD LIGHT NOT COMING ON AFTER ENGINE IS STARTER. ORGINALLY HAD A STATOR GO OUT. REPLACED STATOR, REGULATOR, BATTERY, AND STARTER RELAY.


Hi, Anonymous in order to diagnose the starter circuit you must start with a fully charged battery, 12.5 volts or better and be able to pass a proper load test if necessary. The battery cables and terminals must be clean and tight. The "NEGATIVE" cable is famous for corroding and or breaking inside the harness, check the connectors at both ends. Check your starter relay with a test light for continuity, it could be faulty due to corrosion and sticking in a closed configuration, another claim to fame. Finally, there is the starter solenoid, low battery voltage or faulty battery connections will cause extremely high amperage at the plate and contact shoes and rob the hold in coils of much-needed voltage. In extreme cases, the solenoid plunger plate will literally weld itself to the contact shoes, keeping the circuit closed and thus permanent engagement. Another scenario is unacceptable voltage drop to the starter solenoid from the ignition switch to the starter relay to the starter button, and finally to the solenoid. Remove the green wire from the starter solenoid and hook up the positive lead of your volt meter to the green wire connector and ground the negative lead. Turn on the ignition switch and depress starter button, the voltage reading should be no more than .5 volt less than the battery voltage. If it is more than .5 volt you need to backtrack that part of the circuit with your volt meter until you find the voltage robbing offender. Next remove the 3 screws that secure the solenoid cover and remove the plunger, dress the plate and the contact shoes of arching residue and make sure the contact shoes are tight and secure. If you have done all of the above, replace the green starter button wire, hook up your voltmeter to the battery and check the voltage drop when you start the engine, anything below 9 volts could indicate a faulty battery and a proper load test should be performed. Good luck and have a nice day.

Aug 22, 2015 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

The starter kick in as soon as i turn on the ignition. Can it be the starter switsch or the relay? Its on a Harley Softail 2001 Fxst


To determine where the problem lies, look at the end of the starter and you'll see a single small wire going to solenoid part of the starter. It plugs on just above the 5-sided plate on the end of the starter. Unplug this wire. Turn the ignition switch on. If the starter engages as soon as you turn the switch on, the problem is in the starter. If not, the problem is in the control wiring from the starter switch to the solenoid of the starter.

If you determine that the problem is in the starter, take the 5-sided plate off the end of the starter using a 3mm hex key or Allen wrench. There is a plunger and a long spring in the solenoid. This plunger may be stuck in the pulled in position and making the two large contacts. You must free the plunger up and get it to move in and out freely.

If the problem is in the control circuit, first find and replace the starter relay. It's usually located on the mud guard down low on the front part of the rear fender. In this location, the relay is subjected to a lot of water and dirt. It could be sticking as well. Replace this relay and see if that stops the problem.

If you replace the relay and the starter continues to do the same thing, you must trace the wiring back to the switch in the right handlebar switch housing. You could have a bad start switch as well. You can take the handlbar switch housing apart and replace the switch.

Good Luck
Steve

Jul 04, 2011 | 2001 Harley Davidson FXST Softail Standard

1 Answer

My 97 fatboy battery started dying in 2010. Put bike away for season bought new battery put it in now when I hit start button starter relay clicks wont start an orange and white wire under the seat was...


Well, I don't really know how to tell you to troubleshoot your starter when you don't have a meter. When you press the starter button, there is a starter relay that is usually mounted on the rear fender extension on the Fat Boy that engages and provides voltage to the starter solenoid. This voltage goes to the solenoid via the single small wire that plugs onto the starter just above the d-sided plate on the end of the starter. This wire goes hot which energizes the coil in the solenoid. The magnetism pulls the plunger into the starter. The plunger has a large round copper "washer" that make contact to two copper terminals inside the solenoid that connects the battery to the starter motor.

To test the starter, make SURE your transmission is in neutral. Take the 5-sided plate off the end of the starter. There are three 3mm bolts that hold the plate on. Behind the plate, you'll find the plunger and long spring. Using a large screwdriver or something, push the plunger into the solenoid as far as you can. The starter should engage and turn the engine. If not, look at the copper contacts inside the solenoid. If they look burned and are not smooth across the face, you may need to replace them. Rebuild kits are available both through Harley and aftermarket suppliers.

Good Luck
Steve

Mar 30, 2011 | 1993 Harley Davidson FLSTF Fat boy

1 Answer

Starter will not engage, a rapid ticking sound that sounds like it coming from under the battery. Checked ignition fuse and it is good.


It sounds like your battery is discharged, or you have a poor connection between battery terminals and the starter solenoid relay. You may have a loose ground connection on the frame too.
If you have a voltmeter, test the battery voltage you should have about 13 Volts on a fully charged battery.
If you see a severe drop pushing starter (below 9 volts) battery needs recharging.
If you see virtually no change in voltage....you have a connection issue preventing good current flow.

Mar 06, 2011 | 2008 Yamaha Royal Star Venture

1 Answer

1988model starter does not engage more often than it does engage


Normal 0 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} What is the difference in the sound when it engages and when it does not?
What does engage mean to you.
To me it means a loud click sound followed by the engine cranking.
Actually engage is just the click sound.
Cranking is the small electric starting motor forcing the engine to move as if it were actually running. Once it moves just a bit a spark plugs fire and the resulting explosions makes the engine keep going until one of the following happens.
Loss of air/fuel mixture (i.e. run out of gas or air intake blocked)
Loss of spark (i.e. battery low or dead, bad coil, bad plugs)
The two above do not come together at correct time (timing)
Something physically stops the engine from continuing to operate (engine seizes, too much load)

If battery is low starter will not engage or crank.
If electrical connections are bad (usually loose or dirty) current will not flow properly and starter will not engage or crank.
Both can be checked with a multi meter.
Measure battery voltage when attempting to start.
It should be 12-13.2 volts and should not drop below around 10 volts
If it is not dropping but still not engaging/cranking, continue to take voltage readings move from battery toward the starter. When you find a sudden voltage drop, investigate wiring just before that point upstream toward the battery.

Nov 14, 2009 | Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage Softail...

1 Answer

Sound coming from relay but starter wont engage. can shift into gear so lead to believe shaft with starter gear sheard into gearing/bound up? opinion?


Check for a cracked or broken coil wire, also check that all the connections are tight at the battery as well.

Sep 24, 2009 | 2003 Suzuki DR-Z 400 S

2 Answers

My 1981 yamaha xj650 doen't crank. The oil light comes on when I push the ignition. I would like to know what that means so I can fix it.


you have a bad kick stand safety switch, look where the kick stand mount is, their is a switch with 3 wires, connect two of them together and try it, if not hook the other two together, that will fix your problem.

Jun 26, 2009 | 1981 Yamaha XJ 650

1 Answer

Relay clicks wnen i hit the starter


Sounds like a low battery but if has 12.6 volts then I would bench test the starter.

Apr 26, 2009 | 2003 Honda CB 750 Nighthawk

2 Answers

Electric start not working


i want a speedometer for kymco hipster 125, 03 and handlebars but i cant fine any, could you tell me please.

Mar 06, 2009 | 2003 Kymco Hipster 125

1 Answer

Honda Deauville will not start.


Hi and welcome to FixYa,

The click is significant. It indicates that the starting relay is engaging but for some reason, the starter motor is not cranking. This could either be a faulty starter relay (particularly the contacts) or a faulty starter motor (specifically, the carbon brushes). To determine which:
  • with the side covers off, expose the starter relay particularly the 2 large terminals;
  • have somebody start the bike normally using the key and button start switch;
  • determine if indeed the clicking is coming from the starter relay;
  • while the start button is still pressed, jump the 2 big terminals;
  • if the engine cranks, then the internal contacts of the starter relay are corroded or burned;
  • if the engine will not crank, then the starter motor is faulty or it can not turn the engine..
A few additional ideas:
  • externally charge the battery;
  • drain the tank and carbs of stale fuel;
  • refill with fresh fuel;
  • remove the plugs, center stand the bike, engage 1st gear, rotate rear wheel to exercise engine.
  • Good luck and thank you for using FixYa.

Feb 24, 2009 | 1998 Honda Deauville NTV 650

Not finding what you are looking for?
2003 Harley Davidson FLSTF Fat boy Logo

269 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Harley Davidson Experts

Arnie Burke
Arnie Burke

Level 3 Expert

4477 Answers

Gills Lango

Level 2 Expert

195 Answers

Mike

Level 3 Expert

4331 Answers

Are you a Harley Davidson Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...