Question about 2009 Suzuki Boulevard M109R

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Removing caps on handle bars m109r

I can seem to remove the little silver caps that cover the bolts so I can adjust my handle bar

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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polarcycle
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SOURCE: 2008 GSX-R 600 Ignition Switch Removal and Replace

You will need to remove the gas tank, air box, and possibly some hoses to get to the plug. Not a hard task, just time consuming on a newer bike.

Posted on Jun 02, 2009

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  • 278 Answers

SOURCE: i want to remove the sissy bar on my suzuki vl

More than 2 bolts hold a back rest. Continue

Posted on Oct 13, 2009

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SOURCE: fitting saddlebag bars to M50

Try spraying some lubricant or WD-40 in the frame area, and pull it out. A few mallet blows probably won't be too much.

Posted on Nov 11, 2009

  • 88 Answers

SOURCE: Installation of Sissy Bar

the bolts on the rear fender area hold the sissy bar as well as the rear fender. I had the same difficulties. you will have to buy long bolts that will fit through the sissy bar and through the chrome and then through the fender. I found this out the hard way when I removed the sissy bar and did not replace the bolts. the rear fender was close to falling off the bike.
the bolts are found in diy stores. the only restriction is to make sure the bolt does not go into the area of the rear wheel so that it might come in contact with the tyre.

Posted on Aug 10, 2010

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1 Answer

How do you take cover for handle bar cover come off


Use your fingernail or a fine blade of some sort to pop the little caps out of the four allen head bolts that secure the clamp to the bars. Loosen the allen screws while being careful of the bars dropping once the bolts are loose.

Jul 31, 2013 | 2003 Harley Davidson FLHR Road king

1 Answer

I am trying to adjust the handle bars on my v star 650


TAKE THE TWO SREW COVERS OFF THE ALLEN BOLTS ON THE CENTER OF THE BAR AND LOOSEN THE BOLTS AND ADJUST AS DESIRED THEN RETIGHTIN ALLEN BOLTS AND REINSTALL CAPS

Oct 08, 2011 | 2004 Yamaha V Star Classic

1 Answer

How to remove chain from blade no bolts unde cap


If you have removed the bolts that hold the cover, and the chain is still tight on the bar, locate the chain tension screw and turn it to release tension on the chain. The screw drives the pin that fits into the hole on the bar. When you replace the chain, line up the pin and the hole, and ensure the chain is seated in the bar. Tighten the screw until the bar does not move and the chain does not fall off. Adjust to the normal tension for your saw and replace the cover.

Jul 25, 2011 | Poulan 18" Wild Thing Chainsaw

1 Answer

How do I assemble the bar and chain on my 1.5hp chain saw MS1415?


Start by removing the bar nut/nuts, and remove the side cover, if the chainbrake is in the cover make sure this is off by pulling the hand guard fully back to the top handle, before removing the side cover, wind the chain adjuster screw fulley in toward the rear of the saw ( it may be in the crankcse, or in the side cover ) now assemble the guide bar onto the bar bolt/bolts, loop the cutter chain over the sprocket,and into around the tip of the guide bar, and into the bar rails, make sure the sharp end of the cutters on the top of the guide bar are facing away from the saw ( the chain rotates clockwise as you look at it ) now align the adjuster hole in the bar with the adjuster pawl on the machine, now re fit the side cover, if the adjuster pawl is in the cover make sure this lines up with the adjuster hole in the bar, assemble the bar nut/nuts finger tight, adjust the chain so as it touches all the way around the guide bar ( not sagging on the bottom of the bar ) with a gloved hand pull the chain around the bar to make sure it is free and sitting in the sprocket correctly, re adjust the chain if required, now lift the nose of the bar and fully tighten the bar nut/nuts

Feb 10, 2011 | McCulloch 14" Electric Chain Saw Mcc1514

1 Answer

Trying to put chain and saw together


If the saw has a chainbrake make sure it is de activated by pulling the hand guard fully to the top handle, you should hear an audible clip when it locks, remove the the bar nut/nuts and remove the side cover, if the chain adjuster is in the cover screw it right back, if the adjuster is in the crankcase screw it right back, place the guide bar onto the bar bolts, loop the chain over the sprocket and lay it around the guide bar with the cutters on the top of the bar facing away from the saw, if the adjuster pawl is in the crankcase locate it into the adjuster hole in the guide bar, now re fit the side cover, if the adjuster pawl is in the cover make sure it locates into the adjuster hole in the guide bar, re fit the bar nut/nuts finger tight, screw the adjuster up until the chain sits snuggley around the whole guide bar, pull the chain around the bar manually with a gloved hand, this will make sure it turns freely and is correctly located in the sprocket, hold the end of the guide bar up and tighten the nut/nuts

Jan 23, 2011 | McCulloch Garden

1 Answer

How do I reattach chain after it slipped off


Normal 0 This will be the basic instruction for most common saws. Check that the chain brake is in disengaged position by moving the front hand guard towards the front handle if the saw is equipped with a chain brake on the handle. Loosen the bar nuts on the clutch cover. Loosen tension screw or other adjuster (thumbscrew) to allow the bar to be moved toward the engine. Some saws have this tension adjustment built into the bar. This will provide enough slack in the chain to able to reinstall it. It may be necessary to remove the side cover to gain access to the clutch/gear assembly on the side of the engine if the chain also jumped the gear here. Remove the cover, inspect for any debris or other obstructions in this area. If none, replace the chain back over the drive gear and in the bar groove all the way around the bar. It may be necessary to turn the bar adjuster screw more to provide enough slack in the chain to do this. Once the chain is in place reinstall the cover and bar lock nuts. Snug up the nuts but do not tighten these. Turn the bar/chain adjuster screw to tighten the chain on the bar (take up slack). I usually tighten to a point where there is no slack between the chain and the bottom of the bar and I can still turn the chain easily around the bar by hand. With experience you will get the feel for this chain tension. Once the chain is properly tensioned, tighten the bar lock bolts/ nuts on the side cover. I hope this helps you out.

Jun 25, 2010 | Husqvarna "Chain Saw - 16" Bar, 3 Hp

1 Answer

How do you adjust the handle bars?


On the older FL models, there was chrome cover that covers the handlebar risers. It was held on by two bolts, one on each side of the cover right in the middle of the handlebars. Remove the cover and you can get to the riser. Loosen the top bolts of the riser and adjust the bars. Unless they've changed something, this should work.

Good Luck
Steve

May 29, 2010 | 2005 Harley Davidson FLHRS - FLHRSI Road...

1 Answer

Chain will not move on chainsaw


Normal 0 This will be the basic instruction for most common saws. Check that the chain brake is in disengaged position by moving the front hand guard towards the front handle if the saw is equipped with a chain brake on the handle. Loosen the bar nuts on the clutch cover. Loosen tension screw or other adjuster (thumbscrew) to allow the bar to be moved toward the engine. Some saws have this tension adjustment built into the bar. This will provide enough slack in the chain to able to reinstall it. It may be necessary to remove the side cover to gain access to the clutch/gear assembly on the side of the engine if the chain also jumped the gear here. Remove the cover, inspect for any debris or other obstructions in this area. If none, replace the chain back over the drive gear and in the bar groove all the way around the bar. It may be necessary to turn the bar adjuster screw more to provide enough slack in the chain to do this. Once the chain is in place reinstall the cover and bar lock nuts. Snug up the nuts but do not tighten these. Turn the bar/chain adjuster screw to tighten the chain on the bar (take up slack). I usually tighten to a point where there is no slack between the chain and the bottom of the bar and I can still turn the chain easily around the bar by hand. With experience you will get the feel for this chain tension. Once the chain is properly tensioned, tighten the bar lock bolts/ nuts on the side cover.


Some Poulan Pros have an adjuster screw on the front of the engine case right beside the bar, some have a tool less adjuster on the clutch cover, and some have a slot in the bar for adjusting the chain tension.


I hope this helps you out.

May 15, 2010 | Poulan Pro 42CC 2 Cycle Chainsaw, 18"

1 Answer

Crossmember mount nuts


This is what I found it seems pretty good but I am having a hard time removing the broken piece from the rear holder.
Tools and Materials Required

Floor jack, 2-1/2 ton minimum, 4-ton preferred
2 or 4 jack stands, 2-ton minimum
Breaker bar, 1/2" drive
Ratchet, 3/8" and 1/2" drive
4" or 6" extension, 3/8" and 1/2" drive
1/2", 9/16", 5/8", 11/16", 3/4" open end and box end wrenches/sockets
Scraper, pocket knife, etc. to clean torsion bar socket in A-arm
Bottle jack, wood blocks, etc.
2-lb. sledgehammer
3/8" or 1/2" diameter drift or hard steel punch or similar tool
Large flat blade screwdriver or small pry bar to remove torsion bar socket end seal
Torsion bar tensioning tool
Penetrating oil, as required
Chassis grease, as required
High pressure thread lubricant, as required
Mineral spirits, solvent, etc. as required or desired
Gloves and eye protection
Procedure: NOTE: Always wear eye protection, especially when working under the coach. Be aware that when you loosen/remove any of the hardware or components, a lot of drek will fall out. Protect your eyes. And never, never, NEVER get under the coach unless it is supported securely with appropriate jack stands. Do not get under it while it is only lifted on a jack.

Raise and support vehicle enough to allow loosening of wheel lug nuts, loosen nuts.
With floor jack, raise vehicle at front crossmember until wheels are off the ground.
Support vehicle with jack stands under the front crossmember, and additionally under the frame as the situation warrants.
Remove wheel on whichever side is being worked on.
Apply generous amount of penetrating oil to the torsion bar adjusting bolts and nuts. Let set to thoroughly penetrate rusted bolts. Take a measurement of or carefully observe how far the adjusting bolts are threaded into the nuts. You will need these measurements to approximately reset the bolts for ride height adjustment later.
Apply penetrating oil to mid-frame crossmember attaching bolts. Let set.
Follow the torsion bar to the front, and locate the mounting socket in the lower A-arm. At the front of the hex shaped socket is a soft metal seal cap. You have to remove this cap to be able to slide the torsion bar forward enough to remove it from the rear mount. With the large flat blade screwdriver or small pry bar, pry out this cap. Try not to damage it too much. One or more of the side flanges of the cap may break off and it could get bent up while removing it. It doesn't seem to be too critical, and can be pounded back into shape sufficiently to be reused.
Apply a small amount of high pressure thread lubricant to the threads and end point of the torsion bar tensioning tool. Attach torsion bar tensioning tool squarely on the frame member. Be sure the locating pin is in the guide hole on the top side of the crossmember right over the "pork chop". If your tool does not have this locating pin, be sure to attach the tool squarely on the top of the crossmember.
Tighten any bolts/nuts on the tool to secure it. Turn the center bolt of the tool up into the dimple in the bottom of the pork chop arm. Continue tightening until the end of the pork chop arm is off the adjusting bolt.
Carefully remove the adjusting bolt. This could take some time and a lot of effort. Keep the penetrating oil handy as several applications may be necessary. If it strips or breaks, you'll have to cut it out or burn it out with a torch, and replace it with a new one.
When the adjusting bolt is out, remove the flat nut (rounded with slots on one side).
Turn the torsion bar tensioning tool center bolt counterclockwise to relieve the tension on the pork chop and bar. When the tension is completely off the bar, the tool and bar/pork chop assembly will basically fall apart.
Remove the tool.
Repeat 7 through 13 for the other side, except you don't have to remove the seal cap if you are not removing/replacing the torsion bar. You only have to loosen the bar to be able to move the crossmember.
On the rear side of the crossmember you can see the end of the torsion bar through a small hole in the crossmember. Insert the drift/punch into this hole and with the hammer pound the bar loose until it starts to slide forward. At this point you should probably be able to slide the bar forward enough by hand to clear the crossmember.
Loosen and remove the crossmember mount assembly on the side you're working on. Two bolts and nuts hold it in place. Slide the rubber mount away from the crossmember and remove it.
Loosen the bolts on the other side enough so that the crossmember can be moved. If you are removing/replacing both torsion bars, go ahead and remove the bolts and crossmember mount.
Using the bottle jack and necessary wood blocks, raise the crossmember enough so that the torsion bar can be slid under it. You will have to make sure the bar goes back into the hex socket on the front mount so it will slide through. The old grease in the socket will act like glue, so you may want to loosen it up with penetrating oil or mineral spirits or some other solvent. Slide the bar through and out of the socket. It weighs 25 or 30 pounds so don't let it fall on your head. Remove the bar and yourself from under the coach.
With a pocket knife or other small scraping tool, clean out the old grease from the front hex socket. Use a solvent to remove all the grease, if desired. Clean the old grease from the hex end of the torsion bar.
Reshape the socket seal cap if necessary. Test fit it into the socket, but don't pound it into place yet.
Examine the threads of the adjusting bolt and nut. If they look okay, clean them up with a wire brush. Dress them with a die and tap if you have these tools. Otherwise, the wire brush should be fine. Reassemble them with high pressure thread lube and run the bolt all the way through and back again. Clean the threads again, and re-lube them with thread lube. Leave them disassembled.
Apply a glob of clean chassis grease to the inside of the front hex socket. Be liberal and coat it well. Apply grease over the hex end of the torsion bar.
From under the coach, insert the torsion bar (either replacement or same one) into the front hex socket. Be sure you have the correct bar for the side. Each bar is marked on the end with either "L" or "R". Each one will fit on either side, but you don't want to mix them up. Verify before you assemble.
Installation is just the reverse of removal. Reassemble the bar/pork chop. Tap the bar from the front enough to set it 1/8" or so from the inner surface of the crossmember. Check it at the hole in the crossmember.
Be sure to tap the seal cap back into place.
Reinstall the crossmember mount, and tighten bolts. Be sure to tighten bolts on the side loosened.
Apply the torsion bar tool and raise the end of the pork chop far enough to be beyond where it was originally. Insert the adjusting nut and bolt. Turn the adjusting bolt up to about the same position you observed or measured prior to disassembly. Remove tensioning tool allowing the pork chop to contact adjusting bolt.
Remove jack stands, and reinstall front wheel(s).
Completely lower coach.
Check and adjust ride height as outlined in the Owner's Manual or service manual. Be sure tire pressures are correct and rear suspension is at the correct height ("Travel" position). Use the tensioning tool with the front wheels off the ground to raise or lower the pork chop. Never use the adjusting bolt -- it will strip. No matter which way you have to adjust the ride height, always relieve the tension on the adjusting bolt before trying to turn it.

Jun 23, 2008 | 2004 Ford F250

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