Question about 2005 Suzuki Boulevard C90

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Charging system failed. replaced completely, failed again

Replaced rotor,stator,regulator,battery. ran at 13.79 volts for 11 months, has failed again. smelled something hot but could not identify what was smelling hot. 2005 C-90 boulevard, VL 1500 K5, 21500 MILES.

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  • Anonymous Mar 29, 2014

    bike ran well for about 100 miles stopped for about 30 minutes and battery was dead changed stator now neutral will not light and bike wont start

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Hi and welcome to FixYa,

Initially, pls re-check your voltage regulator. Common/usual signs would be discoloration of the connector, burned/corroded spade lugs of connector, partial melting of the epoxy/plastic packing, the 3 same colored wires (usually yellow) looks bloated/heated up.

Good luck and Thank you for using FixYa.

Posted on Jan 04, 2009

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Posted on Apr 09, 2011

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While riding at night my bike died and could not be started without battery jump. Where do ifind the magneto and regulator to test? and wht output should i be expecting?


its an alternator not magneto, there should be 3 wires white or yellow, going to the reg\rectifier, multi meter across any pair(unplugged) should show 50-80 volts at 2000rpm non of these should short to earth, multi meter across battery should show up to 14v at 2-3000rpm.with everything plugged back in
if alternator checks out, and no voltage more than 12 at battery , replace regulator,,

all assuming the battery wasn't fried when it ran out of acid

my guess is new stator\alternator required

May 26, 2014 | 1989 kawasaki ZXR 250

2 Answers

Battery not charging


Hi Anonymous, your bike is 10 years old how old is your battery? Before any proper electrical diagnosis can be made on your charging system your battery needs to be charged to at least 12.5 volts or higher. Make sure all battery cables and wires have a clean tight connection at the battery and the negative cable is securely grounded. The usual bad guy in this senario is the voltage regulator, remove and inspect for bad connections, cracks or swelling, burnt signs or smell, if it looks ok re-install it and with an ohm merter or test lite confim good ground with ground strap/wire and mounting is tight.Rremove voltage regulator plug at the front right hand side of the inner primary. With your test lite connected to ground touch the regulator pins, if the test lite glows replace the regulator.Then attach the ohm meter to ground with one lead and test stator pins they should both read infinity. Set the ohm meter to the RX1 scale and touch both stator pins with both leads, reading should be 0.1to0.2 ohms. Then set the meter to volts AC and fire up the bike and set the throttle for 2,000RPM meter should read 32 to 40 volts AC release throttle to an idle meter should read 16 to 20 volts AC at 1,000 RPM. Turn off engine and plug regulator back into stator set meter for at least the 20 volt scale DC and fire up the bike again voltage at battery should be 14.3 to 14.7 volts DC at 3,000 RPM if no luck then replace the component that did past it's test, either the voltage regulator or stator and or rotor if necessary. Good luck

Apr 12, 2014 | Harley Davidson FXSTS Springer Softail...

1 Answer

Wiring harness location


Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12 volts or better after charging.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor. Good luck

Jan 28, 2014 | Harley Davidson FXDWG Dyna Wide Glide...

1 Answer

Charging system failure low voltage


Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12 volts or better after charging.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor. Good luck

Jan 07, 2014 | 2011 Harley Davidson FLHTK Electra Glide...

1 Answer

Battery not charging on 2003 super glide


Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12 volts or better after charging.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor. Good luck

Dec 28, 2013 | 2003 Harley Davidson FXD Dyna Super Glide

2 Answers

Test dyna regulator


NEVER EVER pull the positive cable... thats an old trick for cars and old style charging systems... but then again it's your harley not mine. you need a DVOM set to AC volts to test the stator and set to DC volts to test the regulator... anwhere from 5-20 ac volts coming out of stator and 12 volts dc going TO regulator... yes then regulator, no AC volts out of stator... pull the side cover as mentioned above...

Dec 28, 2013 | Motorcycles

2 Answers

1982 Yamaha XJ 550, the battery will not take a charge. New battery, checked all connections, ran all the tests (stator, brushes, and alternator). Replaced the voltage regulator/recifier. Not sure what is...


It is corrected properly, right? + to the wiring harness and - to ground ... right? Are you certain about the rectifier? Is the battery charged at this time?

You know a alternator cannot make power unless you first put power into it ... right? Alternators (unlike most generators) are not self exciting. If your battery is weak or "dead", the alternator cannot make electricity to charge the battery. I don't know what the rating of your alternator is. Your battery should be fully charged before you do any more tests. If you have a 1 amp charger, allow at least 10 hours for a full charge. Don't cook your battery with a big, powerful, fast charging automotive battery charger.

Good luck with your repair ... I hope you find this response helpful.

Thanks for your question @ FixYa.com

May 02, 2011 | Yamaha XJ 650 Motorcycles

1 Answer

After leaving the last gas stop returning from a 1700 mile ride, the check eng light came on, the volt meter read 8-9 volts. Shut off the passing lights and the volt meter slowly rose to 11-12 volts. Next...


Ok, let's check the charging system. The battery is easy. Take the battery out of the bike and take it to an automotive parts store. Ask them to load test the battery for you. If the battery is over two years old, it could need replacing.

Once you're sure the battery is good and it is FULLY CHARGED, we can test the rest of the system. You'll need a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) to check the system. With the battery back in the bike, connect the DVOM across the battery. Red meter lead to the positive terminal of the battery, black meter lead to the negative. Put the meter's function selector switch in DC VOLTS, 20 VOLTS or greater. Start the bike and bring it to a high idle. The meter should read 14.5 - 15.0 volts.

Now, to test the stator, follow the wires from your regulator down to where it goes into the engine cases. Disconnect the connector and look into the engine side of it. You'll see two metal contacts down in there. Set you meter's function selector to AC VOLTS, 50 VOLTS or greater. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Touch each one of the metal contacts down in the engine side of the connector with a meter probe. It makes not difference since we're measuring AC voltage at this point. The meter should read at least 30 volts.

Now, if the alternator (stator test) does not put out at least thirty volts, the stator is bad and needs to be replaced. If the alternator does check good but not enough voltage at the battery, your regulator may be the culprit. Make sure all connections are clean and tight and that the body of the regulator is grounded good. Recheck the test at the battery. If it still fails, replace the regulator.

Now, I've seen may problems such as your's that are intermittant. In other words, the problem is here on minute and gone the next. I fought that on one bike for over a year until we finally replaced the entire charging system and fixed it. If your bike proves to be doing that, you may wish to consider that option. Fix the thing and be done with it. I wouldn't buy the rotor, just the stator and the regulator.

Good Luck
Steve

Aug 31, 2010 | 2003 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

Replace the Battery and Regulator but still not holding a charge. Stator was check and is ok.


The very first thing to do is to take the battery to an automotive parts house. Ask them to load test the battery for you. If the battery isn't up to par, it won't hold a charge.

Now, with a fully charged battery, connect a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) to the battery. Red lead of the meter to the positive post, black meter lead to the negative post. Put the meter's function switch in "DC VOLTS, 20 VOLT or greater range". Start the bike and bring the engine to a high idle. The meter should build up rapidly to read between 14.5 and 15.0 volts. If it does not. Move on to the stator.

Down on the left side of the engine cases, find and unplug the plug for the voltage regulator. Look down into the plug in the engine case. You'll see to metal contacts. You are going to put your meter leads on these contacts. First, change the setting on your meter to "AC VOLTS, 50 VOLTS or greater". Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Put one meter lead on each metal contact down in the plug. It make no difference which lead goes to which contact because we are measuring in AC voltage. Your meter should read at least 30 volts or more. If not, your stator is not up to snuff.

If your stator is putting out enough voltage and the battery is getting 14.5 volts or better, it would appear that your charging system is working as designed. Now, that doesn't mean that it is ALWAYS working as it should. I fought a charging system on a 1991 FXR once for months. It would do fine most of the time but every once in a while, the battery would be dead. Even after a good ride it would be dead. We never could "catch" the charging system messing up. The owner finally got disgusted and had me change the entire system, stator, rotor, and regulator. No more problems. I would guess that the stator or regulator had an intermittant short or open circuit in it somewhere. At any rate, the entire thing went into the recycle bin.

Good Luck
steve

Aug 25, 2010 | 2003 Harley Davidson FXDL Dyna Low Rider

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